Anwars The Storm threads together stories of colonialism migration and communal hatred

first_imgArif Anwar, author of The Storm. Each story within The Storm becomes interconnected as their crisis points draw near. Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: In 1970, a catastrophic cyclone hit the shores of East Pakistan (now Bangladesh), resulting in the deaths of over a half million people. This unimaginable tragedy moors Toronto-based Arif Anwar’s first novel, The Storm.The Storm covers an almost fifty-year-period, starting in an unnamed village just before the cyclone, and then going back and forth in time from pre-partition Kolkata to the Japanese invasion of Burma during the Second World War to post-9/11 Washington, D.C.center_img Advertisement Advertisement Facebooklast_img read more

Continue reading

JOHN CANDYS CHILDREN HELP HONOUR HIS TIMELESS LEGACY AT A TORONTO THEATRE

first_img Twitter Advertisement John Candy’s children say their father’s legacy is “almost timeless,” as the late Canadian comedian became the first inductee at the East York Hall of Fame in Toronto on Friday.The beloved comedy legend called the Ontario city home and his children say their dad never let his fame get to his head.“That’s how he was. This down-to-earth relatable guy that anyone could speak to and want to hear about your day,” Jennifer Candy told CTV National News anchor and W5 correspondent Sandie Rinaldo, saying he was always “happy to talk to anyone and everyone.” Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementcenter_img Candy starred in films such as “Spaceballs,” “Cool Runnings” and “Summer Rental” and even showed up in the Christmas classic “Home Alone.” Login/Register With: Advertisement John Candylast_img read more

Continue reading

Wabauskang First Nation looking for mercury compensation

first_imgAPTN National NewsOttawa and the Ontario government closed the books on mercury compensation two decades ago for those affected along the English and Wabigoon Rivers.But members of the Wabauskang First Nation in Ontario are now fighting to be recognized as victims of mercury poising from the time they were relocated downstream of the contamination in the 1970s.APTN National News reporter Melissa Ridgen has this story.last_img

Continue reading

Canary in a coal mine Melting Arctic open for business

first_imgAPTN National NewsPart of one of the three-part series ‘Canary in a coal mine’ Monday introduced Michele Thrush.The Cree actress was on board the Greenpeace ship Espirenza.The vessel toured northern Norway and showed celebrities and media about the realities of climate change.Tuesday’s story looks at how these changes affect the rest of the planet and how global warming has the Arctic open for business.APTN’s Tom Fennario now with part two.last_img

Continue reading

Bloody Thunder Bay murder capital of Canada

first_imgAPTN National NewsThunder Bay is the largest city in northwestern Ontario.At first glance it looks like any other Canadian city.Except it isn’t.APTN’s Wayne Rivers reports that after a summer of bloody violence, Thunder Bay is anything but a typical northern community.last_img

Continue reading

Lead up to the TRC closing events InFocus

first_imgAPTN InFocus with Cheryl McKenzie:In this edition we hear how churches and religious organizations have united under KAIROS.Together they’re working for reconciliation to reverse the attitudes of the past that encouraged the assimilation of Indigenous children through Canada’s residential schools.We also hear how Saskatoon’s Tribal Council is commemorating the closing of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.last_img

Continue reading

Mohawk family pushing Ontario government to recognize traditional names

first_imgAPTN National NewsA Mohawk family living in Akwesasne is pushing to get the Ontario government to recognize traditional names.So far, the government has denied them.But they’re hoping that will change.APTN’s Annette Francis has the story.last_img

Continue reading

Key Algonquin chief wants tighter rules on who can be part of

first_img(Algonquins of Ontario claim map)Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsThe chief of the Algonquin band at the centre of a massive Ontario land claim says he’d like to see the eligibility criteria for membership tightened as another report surfaced this week questioning the Indigenous heritage of over a third of individuals on the list for an upcoming vote on the modern day treaty covering a large swath of the province, including the city of Ottawa.Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation Chief Kirby Whiteduck said many in his community have expressed concerns about the current eligibility criteria to become part of the Algonquins of Ontario (AOO) modern day treaty process. Kirby said he has expressed these misgivings internally and with the negotiators for Ontario and the federal government.“If we do continue this discussion, I think Pikwakanagan is going to be drawing attention to the criteria because Pikwakanagan members are expressing concerns and questions about it,” said Whiteduck, in an interview Friday.A tighter AOO eligibility criteria could mean some on the list to vote next week to approve an interim step along the modern day treaty process, also known as a comprehensive claim, may not qualify to become beneficiaries by the time a final agreement is signed.A report released Thursday by an Algonquin organization based in Quebec claimed to show that over one-third of the individuals on the AOO voters list haven’t had an Indigenous ancestor in their family tree for up to 300 years.The report, released Thursday, was produced by the Algonquin Nation Secretariat (ANS) which represents three Algonquin First Nation in Quebec. Two of the member Algonquin bands have overlapping claims with the AOO claim.The ANS report surfaced as opposition to the AOO has grown within Pikwakanagan ahead of a vote to approve or reject the proposed treaty’s agreement-in-principle (AIP). Voting is scheduled to begin Feb. 29 and run to March 7.Click here for more coverage of Algonquins of Ontario modern day treaty.Opponents from Pikwakanagan First Nation—the only Algonquin First Nation band involved in the vote—plan to hold a protest Sunday.The AOO claim covers about 3.6 million hectares stretching from Algonquin Park east to Hawkesbury, Ont., including Ottawa, and down into territory near Kingston, Ont.  If finalized, the deal would see $300 million in capital funding and 47,550 hectares of Ontario Crown land transferred to the AOO.There are a total of 10 communities that make up part of the AOO claim, but only Pikwakanagan is a recognized band under the Indian Act. The other nine are recognized as Algonquin communities only within the framework of the AOO treaty talks.The ANS report analyzed the ancestry of the 7,714 individuals on the AOO voters list. Of the total, only 663 on the list are from Pikwakanagan itself, the report said. The rest, 7,051, qualified to be on the list as a result of having a “root ancestor” connected to the signatories of petition letters sent by area Algonquins in the 1770s to the Crown seeking reserve lands in what is now known as Ontario.“It…appears that the ‘Algonquins’ who are relying on these root ancestors have had no intermarriage with anyone of Algonquin or Nipissing ancestry for at least 200 and, in some cases, more than 300 years,” said the report, written by Peter Di Gangi and Alison McBride for the ANS.The report concluded that  3,016 individuals on the AOO list, about 39 per cent, fall within this category.“This is our assessment based on the information we had available,” said Di Gangi, director of policy and research for the ANS. “If anyone has information that sheds further light on this that clarifies this, I would love to see it.”The analysis looked at 10 of the root ancestors used by those on the AOO voters list to qualify as potential beneficiaries of the eventual treaty. These root ancestors had origins dating to the 1600s or 1700s, the report said. In the majority of the cases the descendants of these ancestors were French-Canadian over the subsequent 10 to 15 generations which represents as time span of about 300 years, according to the report.The AOO is disputing the ANS report, calling it flawed.“It is unfortunate that this report was released without any effort having been made to seek input from the AOO who compiled the data that was accessed just to see whether the conclusions and the facts upon which those conclusions are based are accurate,” said Robert Potts, the chief negotiator for the AOO. “Clearly the intent of this rush to judgment is to disrupt, if not undermine, the transparent and democratic process that is underway to vote on an (AIP) that will have no legal nor binding impact and is intended to provide a framework for negotiating a treaty.”Potts said the AOO’s own genealogist analyzed the ANS report and found that it had under-counted the number of Pikwakanagan members on the list. Potts said the actual number is 840. He said 179 Pikwakanagan members decided to be represented through one of the nine other Algonquin groupings that are part of the claim.Potts said five of the 10 root ancestors analyzed by the ANS report already faced and passed eligibility challenges through the AOO’s independent adjudication process handled by an elders committee and a retired judge. The five root ancestors met the AOO’s criteria for root ancestors, said Potts. The other five root ancestors have not faced any challenges, he said.“Presumably because there was a lack of credible evidence on which to base such a challenge,” said Potts.The ANS analysis follows a report by Kebaowek First Nation—an Algonquin community based in Quebec—released to APTN earlier this month which studied at a small sample of 200 individuals from the AOO voters list. The Kebaowek report found that 72 of the 200 had only one Algonquin ancestor stretching back six generations.Greg Sarazin, a former Pikwakanagan chief and treaty negotiator, acts as the spokesperson for growing opposition to the modern treaty within the community. He said the current proposed agreement would lead to the extinguishment of Pikwakanagan and its tax-free status under the Indian Act.“The rights of the future of Pikwakanagan, who are the status people, is being decided largely by people who are not status from Pikwakanagan,” said Sarazin, who was chief from 1987 to 1989. “We don’t want this AIP because it will be the end of Pikwakanagan.”The Whiteduck band council recently circulated a question and answer document in an attempt to alleviate concerns. The document says ratification of the modern treaty would not extinguish Pikwakanagan’s reserve status or its tax exemption. The document said those issues would be part of an eventual self-government aspect of the treaty to be dealt with further down the line.Sarazin said the band council is splitting hairs because the current proposed treaty deal puts Pikwakanagan on the path to extinguishment.“We are saying right now, we don’t want to do this,” he said.Sarazin said many Pikwakanagan members were surprised to learn they were not automatically put on the AOO voters list for next week’s vote. He said the band council will be holding a side vote to include all registered band members, but it remains unclear how those results will mesh with the AOO results.“People are fighting for their very existence,” he said.Whiteduck said Pikwakanagan members need to get the full story. He said the AIP is not binding and the final agreement will be improved through more negotiations.“If they say no for legitimate, good reasons then that’s fine, I accept it. But we think we can still change things in the AIP,” said Whiteduck. “If not, we lose the opportunity to improve things and change the things they (the opposition) are looking to have changed…Everything is not going to be exactly what we want in the agreement, but some things will be better…Overall, it is an improvement compared to staying with the status quo and where that takes us.”And the status quo could lead to Pikwakanagan disappearing, said Whiteduck.An internal analysis produced by the band council projected there may be no one left in Pikwakanagan with Indian status within 60 to 70 years as a result of the restrictive status criteria under the Indian Act, said Whiteduck.“Under the current Indian Act regime the membership is going to dwindle and at some point there might be no members, no one with status, everyone will be subject to taxes and the reserve won’t belong to anybody,” said Whiteduck.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

Continue reading

RCMP say three boys dead in Manitoba after being struck by vehicle

first_imgThe Canadian PressNELSON HOUSE, Man. — A northern Manitoba community is grieving after three young boys were struck and killed by an alleged drunk driver who fled the scene Saturday night.A 13-year-old and two 11-year-olds were on Provincial Road 620, two kilometres north of Nelson House when they were hit by a vehicle with five people in it around 10:30 p.m., RCMP said.Investigators said two of the children were walking and one was riding a bike on the road at the time.The children died at the scene and when officers arrived, they found the vehicle empty.“There was no driver or occupants at the time, as they had fled the scene. Within a short period of time, the four occupants returned back to the scene and provided information back to police about who the driver was, as he had fled on foot,” said RCMP spokesman Sgt. Paul Menaigre. “I guess they went after him, but he took off.”Information spread quickly through the community and by midnight, the driver walked into the Nelson House RCMP detachment and turned himself over to two officers, who were on their way to continue looking for him.The alleged driver, who is a 27-year-old member of the Nelson House community, was arrested without incident and remains in police custody.“He’ll be facing numerous charges, including fleeing the scene of an accident and numerous impaired driving-related charges,” Menaigre said.“We’ve conducted tests and determined he was impaired by alcohol.”Menaigre expected charges would be laid by Monday.He said in situations like this, the community is likely to feel shock, anger and grief.“Alcohol is involved, it could have easily been prevented. So there could be anger in the community, because we’re at the stage of not understanding ‘why’ _ that’s the anger part _ and then eventually there’s the grieving process. We want to get as much information as we can figured out quickly, so they can begin that process,” he said.Grand Chief Sheila North of the Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak, a political advocacy organization, said several staff members from Nelson House are grieving.“Everyone knows each other and it’s a growing, prospering community,” North said of the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation, which is based in Nelson House.“They’re very heartbroken and shocked. I talked to the [Nisichawayasihk] Chief Marcel Moody as well. He says the whole community is deeply saddened and in complete shock that the boys have succumbed to this kind of tragedy. His own grandsons are friends with those kids so it’s very close to home for the chief,” she said.North said the leadership is very progressive and in tune with the community’s needs, but it can only do the best it can without more funding for infrastructure projects like street lighting.Perry Bellegarde, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, sent condolences to members of the community on Sunday.“My heart goes out to the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation and the families of three young boys tragically killed last night while out for a bike ride. Extending love and support to all who knew them,” Bellegarde wrote on Twitter.Others also tweeted their support for the community.Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister posted his thoughts: “Our hearts go out to the families of three young boys who left us far too soon. To the entire community of Nelson House and NCN, we mourn this heartbreaking loss with you.”The Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs tweeted condolences on behalf of Grand Chief Arlen Dumas and assembly members.Nelson House is about 800 kilometres north of Winnipeg and 80 kilometres west of Thompson, Man. It is made up of four reserves, according to the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation’s website.The Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation has around 4,600 members.last_img read more

Continue reading

Irving Oil raises cautions about NB Liberals throne speech talk of carbon

first_imgFREDERICTON – Irving Oil says any New Brunswick carbon plan needs to allow the province’s businesses to remain competitive.Premier Brian Gallant’s government announced in Tuesday’s throne speech that his Liberal government would bring in carbon pricing that helps combat climate change.The premier says the pricing model will minimize the impact on consumers while calling on industry to reduce emissions or pay its fair share.In a statement sent to The Canadian Press, Irving Oil said 80 per cent of its production goes to the U.S., where its competitors face no carbon tax.Jeff Matthews, an executive from the firm, said in the release that the firm is “committed to working with all levels of government on a plan that protects the environment while also maintaining competitiveness for New Brunswick businesses.”He’s calling on the province to create a Made in New Brunswick carbon pricing model.last_img read more

Continue reading

Sherritt to transfer part ownership of Madagascar mine to settled debt woes

first_imgTORONTO – Sherritt International Corp. (TSX:S) says it has reached a deal with the joint owners of a Madagascar mine that will see it transfer more ownership to cut its outstanding debt.The Toronto-based miner says it will shift a 28 per cent interest in the Ambatovy nickel mine joint venture to partners Sumitomo Corp. and Korea Resources Corp. in a deal that will eliminate $1.3 billion in partner loans from its balance sheet.Sherritt will be left with a 12 per cent stake in the mine, but remain operator until at least 2024.The company has struggled to make payments on its debt to the partners, and has been operating under a temporary deferral agreement while unable to make cash payments.Sherritt says the Ambatovy mine is the world’s largest finished nickel operation of its kind, with expected production this year of 36,000- to 39,000-tonnes of finished nickel and 3,300 to 3,600 tonnes of finished cobalt.The company also says it has had a fatality at its Energas S.A. power generation in Cuba due to an apparent electrocution.last_img read more

Continue reading

Phoenix legal defeat prompts FAA to address noise concerns

first_imgPHOENIX – Nearly 100 people strolled through the high school cafeteria throughout the evening, studying colored graphs of flight takeoffs and jotting down comments for officials.More than three years after they awoke to find window-rattling flights rerouted in an airborne highway above their homes, residents of Phoenix’s downtown historic districts said they finally felt the Federal Aviation Administration was listening.A court victory by Phoenix and neighbourhood groups over the FAA last year has prompted the agency to be more responsive to residents as it continues to beat back noise complaints around the United States over the air traffic modernization plan known as “NextGen.”While challenges by residents of Washington’s Georgetown neighbourhood and other jurisdictions are still being heard in court, people in other affected areas such as Santa Cruz, California, have not sued the agency because they believe their complaints are being considered. Phoenix residents said they appreciated the FAA’s current approach.“They are being transparent now,” Opal Wagner, a resident of the vintage Willo district and vice-president of the Phoenix Historic Neighbourhoods Coalition, said at the first of three FAA public workshops held last week. She and others expressed disappointment that a fourth one wasn’t scheduled downtown where most noise complaints originated.“I think that it’s good that they are now dialoguing with the public,” Wagner said. “Maybe if they had done this in the beginning, there wouldn’t have been a lawsuit.”The historic districts and the city sued the agency after the FAA changed Phoenix Sky Harbor’s flight routes in September 2014, bringing airplane noise to public parks and the quiet neighbourhoods of charming bungalows, ranch houses and Spanish revival homes, some dating to the 1920s and earlier. About 2,500 households were affected. The noise got so bad for some, they sold their homes and moved.The FAA started revising flight paths and procedures around the United States in 2014 under the NextGen plan, which uses more precise, satellite-based navigation to save time, increase how many planes airports can handle, and reduce fuel burn and emissions. Noise complaints poured in from Orange County, California, to Washington, D.C., as flights took off at lower altitudes, in narrower paths and on more frequent schedules.The rollout of the procedures in Phoenix initially represented NextGen’s “most problematic implementation,” said Chris Oswald, vice-president of safety and regulatory affairs with Airports Council International-North America, a trade association that represents commercial airports in the U.S. and Canada. He said he was cautiously optimistic about the FAA’s more open approach.In the Phoenix case, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit on Aug. 29 agreed with the city and historic districts that the FAA was “arbitrary and capricious” in its flight procedure revisions in that area. The court said by leaving people in the dark, the agency made it impossible for the public to express views on the project’s potential effects — something the FAA is especially required to do for historic places and parks.Phoenix residents said they received no forewarning about the flight changes after FAA officials determined they would have no adverse impact and claimed a “categorical exclusion.”Following the court ruling, Phoenix and the FAA on Nov. 30 announced a joint plan aimed at resolving the dispute. Under the plan filed with the appellate court, the FAA agreed to reach out to residents while temporarily resuming the previous departure routes starting April 1.In a second step, it will develop satellite-based procedures for the original routes, seeking community feedback throughout the process.“I think we will get a considerable amount of relief with the return of the flights to their previous paths,” said Brent Kleinman, president of the Encanto-Palmcroft Historic Preservation Association in central Phoenix.“But the majority of the work is going to be in the second part of the process,” he said, which will decide the final flight paths.During last week’s workshops, Phoenix residents received printed material and mingled with FAA environmental experts and the airspace designers who fashion flight paths.“This is a format that we’ve used at other workshops, and it works really well,” said Ian Gregor, public affairs manager for the FAA’s Pacific Division, who attended all three sessions. “The people who have actually designed these procedures are on hand to answer questions.”Phoenix isn’t the only place where people say the FAA didn’t explain new routes or give them an opportunity to comment.In the Washington metro area, Georgetown University and neighbourhood groups have said the agency left them out of the loop about changes at Ronald Reagan National Airport. In nearby Maryland, residents objected to aircraft noise from both Reagan National and Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.But in Santa Cruz County, residents who initially complained about noise from planes headed to San Francisco said the FAA has been responsive to their worries. A dozen residents chosen by members of Congress in the three affected districts met with FAA representatives weekly throughout much of 2016 to come up with less obtrusive flight approach procedures.A new approach to the airport that is at least as quiet as it was before NextGen should take effect in August, said Denise Stansfield, founder of the Save our Skies citizen group. Technical problems temporarily increased noise for some residents recently, but once that pathway is permanently adopted, “you’re going to see the biggest celebration ever,” Stansfield said.___Anita Snow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/asnowreportslast_img read more

Continue reading

Keeping staffers motivated productive during the holidays

first_imgNEW YORK — The holiday season can be a motivation and productivity killer at some small businesses. Staffers may spend time chatting or shopping online, ask to leave early for children’s holiday events or just not be in the mood to work.The companies with the most holiday problems are likely to be ones where November and December aren’t a particularly busy period — they’re not retailers, restaurants, caterers and other companies where staffers understand when they’re hired that this is prime time and everyone has to be physically and mentally present. At any company, if employees are distracted, owners may find that being firm but flexible will help keep everyone focused.Human resources professionals say holiday issues, like any matters that involve employees, are easier to resolve when staffers know in advance what the expectations and limits are. So, owners who sense that their workers are likely to be sitting and talking about parties and gifts may want to remind everyone now that chatting needs to be kept to a minimum. And if the owner or managers are seeing people giving in too much to temptation, a friendly, “hey, we have work to do,” is in order.It’s probably going to be impossible to completely stop staffers from shopping online. The solution may be to remind staffers that they should wait until break or lunch times to do their ordering. And if the owner sees someone shopping at other times, don’t make a big scene, but remind the staffer of the rules.Staffers who want to leave early for children’s plays or concerts should be given the chance to do so, but they also need to give the boss advance notice that there’s an event coming up and they must be held responsible for getting their work done. It may require some flexibility from an owner — allowing staffers to work remotely, come in early or leave late on another day. If the staffer needs a co-worker to cover for them, it’s the employee’s responsibility to set that up.HR pros warn that there’s a caveat about letting staffers leave for family events but not allowing others without children to take time to go to an event they’re interested in. Some employees can feel discriminated against if they see others getting what they feel is special treatment, and that could mean legal repercussions down the road. It’s best not to judge what kind of event is OK — as long as staffers are getting their work done, they should have permission to take part in an extracurricular activity.Some companies that have flexibility at holiday time give staffers an afternoon of their choosing off. Employees will consider that time to be a real gift — and knowing they’ll have a little free time may help them stay focused the rest of the holiday season._____For more small business news, insights and inspiration, sign up for our free weekly newsletter here: http://discover.ap.org/ssb_____Follow Joyce Rosenberg at www.twitter.com/JoyceMRosenberg . Her work can be found here: https://apnews.com/search/joyce%20rosenbergJoyce M. Rosenberg, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Continue reading

Pilots struggled to control plane that crashed in Indonesia

first_imgLion Air pilots struggled to maintain control of their Boeing jet as an automatic safety system in the Boeing jet repeatedly pushed the plane’s nose down, according to a draft of a preliminary report by Indonesian officials who are looking into last month’s deadly crash.The investigators are focusing on whether faulty information from sensors led the plane’s system to force the nose down.Indonesian authorities are expected to issue a report Wednesday, although it is unclear whether they will offer a probable cause for the Oct. 29 crash. The new Boeing 737 MAX 8 plunged into the Java Sea, killing all 189 people on board.Boeing did not immediately respond to an emailed request for comment.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Continue reading

South Korea fines BMW 10 million over several engine fires

first_imgSEOUL, Korea, Republic Of — South Korea says it will fine BMW 11.2 billion won ($9.9 million) and file a criminal complaint against the company with state prosecutors over an allegedly botched response to dozens of engine fires reported in the country.South Korea’s Transport Ministry said Monday its investigation panel after a five-month review concluded that the German automaker deliberately tried to cover up technical problems and moved too slowly to recall vehicles after around 40 of its cars caught fire earlier this year.BMW recalled some 172,000 vehicles in July and October over the fires it has blamed on a faulty exhaust gas component. The company said there had been no reports of injuries linked to the fires.BMW’s South Korean unit didn’t immediately comment on the ministry’s announcement.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Continue reading

Chamber of Commerce Luncheon on Immigration for BCs Future

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The upcoming Chamber Luncheon will host Katie Rosenberger, Executive Director of the Affiliation of Multicultural Societies and Service Agencies (AMSSA) on the need to strengthen newcomer integration.The BC Provincial Association will share how they help to strengthen member agencies and stakeholders who serve newcomers and build culturally inclusive communities with the knowledge, resources and support.After an extensive consultation period in November 2017, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada released its multi-year Immigration Levels Plan. This plan is to help be proactive in determining service and market integration needs by impact settlement and integration programming. Yet it was clear that BC lacked planning in regards to the integration of newcomers. Employment in BC increased at a faster pace than at the national level which enabled BC’s labour force to expand by 74,700 persons in 2016 and 68,400 persons in 2017, to reach a labour force of 2.6 million people.Shared in the promotion information from the Chamber, according to the Economic Insight no. 81, Recent Economic Developments in British Columbia, Immigration, particularly to Vancouver, accounted for 50% of the overall labour force increase in 2016.The promotion information goes on to share that the 2018 BC Labour Market Outlook forecasts 903,000 job openings between 2018 and 2028 with 68% of these openings occurring due to retirement and 32% due to the creation of new jobs.It is estimated that 27% of these vacancies will need to be filled by 24,300 immigrants each year. The 2018 BC Labour Market Outlook estimates that 77% of the 903,000 jobs that need to be filled by 2028 will require at least some form of post-secondary education or training.The need for a highly qualified workforce requires a commitment from BC to provide job-readiness training and industry-specific language training for newcomers. Their innovative ideas and diverse perspectives can contribute significantly to existing structures, according to the Conference Board of CanadaThe AMSSA released a report September 2018 calling for action from the Government of BC to increase support for the integration of newcomers. The report provides a series of significant recommendations for investments into BC’s immigration integration system.Immigration for BC’s FutureTuesday, January 22, 201911:45 am – 1:00 pmPomeroy Hotel & Conference Centre11308 Alaska RoadTo Register for the event CLICK HERElast_img read more

Continue reading

Doig River First Nations presents Kih tsaaʔdze Tribal Park to Council

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – At a recent City Council meeting, Doig River First Nations made a presentation to Council and requested a letter to be sent to the Pathway to Canada, Target 1 Challenge, to receive funding to for a four year work plan and establish their Tribal Park, K’ih tsaaʔdze (“kih-tsah-tsay”).Council carried the motion to write the requested letter in order for the Doig River First Nation to move forward and prepare their proposal for funding from the Pathway to Canada, Target 1 Challenge, part of Canada’s Nature fund.  By establishing the K’ih Tsaa?dze Tribal Park as an Indigenous Protected and Conserved area, the park will maintain the following; “Doig has been really good at inclusivity. We are all land users, this is our backyard. There has to be a balance between industry and enviroment,”Chief Trevor Makadhay said at the end of the presentation, “It is up to all of us to bring initiatives like this to a happy ending. If we do it all together, its something we can all be proud of together.”Mayor Lori Ackerman shared, through openness, transparency and accountability to your community you have been able to achieve that and I see that same approach with this project. 1. Maintain Doig River traditional and contemporary cultural uses2. Restore ecological integrity and biological diversity3. Maintain natural ecological integrity and biological diversityThe land in which the K’ih Tsaa? dse is located is rich with cultural significance to the Doig River First Nations. The land holds deep spiritual meaning as it has been a place of stories that tell about many births and deaths that have taken place there.Application to the Nature Fund and the potential of receiving funds would bring provinces, territories, Indigenous people, the private and non-profit sectors together to collaborate towards meeting the terrestrial elements of Target 1 of Canada’s 2020 Biodiversity Goals and Targets shares the Doig River First Nations.Target 1 states: “By 2020, at least 17 percent of terrestrial areas and inland water, and 10 percent of coastal and marine areas, are conserved through networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures.”K’ih Tsaa?dze will be managed under an ecosystem-based conservation plan (EBCP), prepared by Doig River First Nation, and endorsed by the Provinces of BC and Alberta. The focus of the plan will be to protect, and/or where necessary, restore natural ecological and cultural integrity within K’ih Tsaa?dze.K’ih Tsaa?dze Tribal Park is made up of boreal forest, including wetlands, deciduous forests, mixed wood forests and coniferous forest which is home to a highly productive, biologically diverse boreal ecosystems, rare species and a natural habitat for boreal Caribou.The area which is located 40 kilometres northeast of Fort St. John, is 90,000-hectares of land straddling the B.C.-Alberta border.last_img read more

Continue reading

Treatment meted out to Advani shameful

first_imgPatna: Actor-turned-politician Shatrughan Sinha, the sitting BJP MP from Patna Sahib who has been denied a ticket by the party this time, has accused Prime Minister Narendra Modi of treating party patriarch L K Advani in a “painful” and “shameful” manner.In a series of tweets on Saturday, Sinha claimed that the BJP’s decision to not give ticket to Advani, the sitting MP from Gandhinagar, and to field party president Amit Shah from the seat “has not gone down well” with many people. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM'”Sirji… it is worrisome, painful and according to some even shameful… that which your people have done was the most expected and awaited… orchestrating the departure of a most respected friend, philosopher, guide, father figure and ultimate leader of the party, Shri L K Advani from the political arena/election,” Sinha tweeted. Advani, 91, has served as Union home minister and deputy prime minister. He was also the national president of the BJP more than once. He is often credited with helping the party create a national footprint within a decade of its formation through active participation in the Ayodhya movement. In another tweet, Sinha deplored “the replacement of Mr Advani by none other than the man who is also the president of the party and whose image or personality is no match nor even a patch on him”. “This has been done intentionally and deliberately and not gone down well with the people of the country,” the rebel BJP leader claimed.last_img read more

Continue reading

AAP kickstarts Jansampark Abhiyaan in South Delhi

first_imgNEW DELHI: Aam Aamdi Party’s South Delhi Lok Sabha Candidate Raghav Chadha along with Kalkaji MLA Avtar Singh kickstarted the Mega Jansampark Abhiyaan in Kalkaji legislative assembly. With this campaign, the AAP seeks to carry out a door to door campaign educating people about how Delhi can attain full statehood and how the people of Delhi would benefit from its full statehood. An individual and personalized appeal for votes and support is also made during the visits. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderRaghav Chadha said, “It gets very hot in the month of May and with summer vacations, many families plan outstation trips but I urge you to exercise your democratic right and duty and cast your vote in the upcoming elections on May 12, 2019. You can leave for your grandmother’s place right after elections.” He said, “With this, we are reaching out to each and every voter in our constituency and engaging with their families and talking about the work done by Delhi government under the leadership of CM Arvind Kejriwal in the past 4 years. We are urging people to to cast their vote for AAP in the upcoming elections.”last_img read more

Continue reading

Alibaba heads remarks spark debate over China working hours

first_imgBeijing: Remarks by the head of Chinese online business giant Alibaba that young people should work 12-hour days, six days a week if they want financial success have prompted a public debate over work-life balance in the country. Jack Ma is one of China’s richest men and his comments last week brought both condemnation and support as China’s more mature economy enters a period of slower growth. Newspaper People’s Daily, the ruling Communist Party’s mouthpiece, issued an editorial, saying mandatory overtime reflects managerial arrogance and was also impractical and unfair to workers. Online complaints included blaming long work hours for a lower birth rate in the country. Ma has responded to the criticism by saying work should be a joy and also include time for study, reflection and self-improvement. (AP)last_img read more

Continue reading