McCoy still needs two for landmark

first_img McCoy was narrowly denied in the opening novice hurdle on Flemenson by the Hadden Frost-ridden Rydon Pynes, while his mount in the following race, Keen Eye, never looked like taking a hand in the finish at any stage. His third ride of the afternoon, Well Hello There, travelled extremely well for much of the three-mile handicap chase but a bad blunder just before the home straight cost him any chance of victory and he was ultimately well beaten. Press Association Tony McCoy will have to wait until Chepstow on Wednesday at the earliest for his 4,000th winner after drawing a blank with three rides at Exeter to remain on the 3,998 mark.center_img The 18-times champion jockey has two booked rides at the Welsh venue on Wednesday – the Rebecca Curtis-trained El Macca in the R.A.B.I. Gateway Project Maiden Hurdle and Jonjo O’Neill’s Mission Complete, who could be appropriately named should he land the NFU Mutual Supports R.A.B.I. Handicap Hurdle. last_img read more

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Gerrard ready for final farewell

first_img “It’ll be a tough game for us away at Stoke but we go there and we want to finish the season strongly. “I always believe it’s a good sign of the team if they can keep going to the very end and that’ll be our ambition against Stoke.” While the contract dispute with Sterling is likely to rumble on throughout the summer the club were at least able to tie down another promising youngster to a long-term deal this week. Jordon Ibe, a year younger than Sterling, enjoyed his first-team breakthrough in the second half of the season after returning from a loan spell at Derby. He is hoping to make greater strides next season. “To be honest, the number-one target for me is to get goals and try to stay in the team. They’re the two main goals for me,” he told LFCTV. “I need to keep playing well, getting goals and making the gaffer happy. I’ve got to help the team win games and then hopefully I can secure it (my place) in the new season. “To win medals – that’s the number one thing for me. I want to help us get back into the Champions League and try to win that one day. “We were close last year to the league title, so that is another aim – as well as the FA Cup.” Headlines about Raheem Sterling’s contract issues and the prospect of Liverpool losing a star player this summer have deflected attention from the departure of one of the club’s true greats. There was, quite correctly, great fanfare surrounding Steven Gerrard’s final match at Anfield last week but Sunday’s trip to Stoke will be the midfielder’s 710th and final appearance for the Reds. Having got through the emotionally-charged send-off in front of his home fans, manager Brendan Rodgers has no doubts about the 34-year-old’s ability to handle his final curtain call at the Britannia Stadium. Press Association “He’ll be very able,” said the Reds boss. “I’m sure for Steven it’s been a huge relief. Leading into your last game at Anfield, which has been his home for 17 years, there was probably a whole load of emotion. “Unfortunately our performance level wasn’t what we expected (they suffered a 3-1 defeat to Crystal Palace) but I think the crowd and the supporters recognised the moment and gave him a great send-off. “So I’m sure for him it’s a huge sigh of relief and he has worked well this week concentrating on Sunday’s game.” A disappointing campaign will come to an end with Liverpool playing for nothing more than the security of fifth place and a Europa League spot. It will be of little consolation after the minimum target set in pre-season was a top-four slot. “I’ve said at the beginning of the season (the aim) is to finish as high as we possibly can,” said Rodgers. “That is the aim for the game. Our season doesn’t finish until the whistle blows on Sunday. last_img read more

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Home loss to Proteas galvanises Australia, says Warner

first_imgBENGALURU, India (Reuters) – Australia’s defeat in the home series against South Africa helped them galvanise, opening batsman David Warner said yesterday ahead of the second Test against India.Australian cricket plunged into a crisis after a 3-0 whitewash in Sri Lanka was followed by successive home defeats to South Africa.After a national outcry forced wholesale changes, Steve Smith’s men recovered by winning the final Test against South Africa in Adelaide before beating Pakistan 3-0.In Pune, they took just two-and-a-half days to secure a first Test triumph in India since 2004, handing out a 333-run thumping to a side that had gone 20 Tests without tasting defeat on home soil.“It was obviously quite painful, that loss at home. South Africa outplayed us, but we’ve moved on from that and Smudge (Smith) got us all together and we galvanised well,” Warner told reporters ahead of Saturday’s second Test.“I think it takes a loss like that at home sometimes to really get guys going. It’s not that we needed that, it’s just the fact it’s a bit of a reality check that you can have one bad session, and it can be taken away from you even on home soil.”Warner made 38 and 10 in Pune but opening partner Matt Renshaw made an eventful India debut as Australia went 1-0 up in the four-match series.The 20-year-old battled a stomach bug and raced off the ground while batting to take a toilet break. He returned to hit 68 and then another 31 in the second on a difficult pitch for batting.“He played fantastic,” Warner said. “It could have been a different story if he stayed out there or he didn’t come off but the way he played and the way he adapted from coming off, being sick and going back out there was credit to him.“We’ve never seen him play in these conditions as well, so we know how he can play and that’s the good thing about this game.”last_img read more

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Speakers propose innovations for public schooling

first_imgThe USC Alumni Education Network hosted “The Business of Education,” featuring two speakers who discussed the challenges and innovations possible in public schooling.The event, which took place last week at the Ronald Tutor Campus Center, featured Don Brann and Matthew Wunder. Brann holds degrees from both the Marshall School of Business and the Rossier School of Education.  He has a 40-year career in education, which includes creating Da Vinci Schools, a chain of charter schools in the U.S. that promotes real world experience and project-based learning, and leading various school districts.  Wunder is the CEO and one of the founders of Da Vinci Schools, with 25 years of experience in the education industry.Wunder and Brann started the event with an exercise that was meant to teach the audience how difficult it is to deal with a school budget.  Brann spoke of how people often think of budget cuts as an obligation to cut costs, but he sees it as an opportunity to recruit more students.“When I see there is some kind of discrepancy between what resources I have … and what I want to do. What I do is, I do not think of cutting things, I think of raising the revenue,” he said. “And, the main way to raise revenue is to raise the number of students that you serve.”Having been successful in raising student enrollment at the Wiseburn Unified School District in California, Brann suggested ideas for increasing enrollment rates.  He told the audience that customer service was one of the most important things to focus on.“I view America as a place that does not have sufficient customer service, and Americans are very hungry for people to work with and to serve them that care,” he said. “To me, the way to connect people and to hook them was to give them great customer service, so that is what we based the transformation of Wiseburn School District.”He noticed that many of the students in the district came from homes where their parents were working full time, and they often found themselves coming back from school to an empty house.  Brann addressed this problem by implementing a before- and after-school program, in which he helped build a bridge between the parents’ schedules and the kids’ schedules in school.  By making parents’ lives work logistically, he helped increase the amount of students enrolled.Additionally, Brann made changes in the school to account for what parents’ valued in a school.  Brann implemented lower class sizes and easier access to the principal, among other details that parents’ were interested in.  He also achieved higher test scores. Then, the program was marketed through offices of big employers throughout the district, ones that would attract busy parents who wanted their children in good schools.In the 15 years that Brann worked in the Wiseburn School District, he never made budget cuts. Instead of layoffs and slashing the budget, he implemented things that would attract more students to enroll and, therefore, increase revenue.Brann’s new project is working with the Inglewood School District, where he said he has found many problems with corruption and bad management.  When he arrived, Brann found that people were stealing food and textbooks and then reselling them for a profit. In the last seven years, Brann said Inglewood has lost 28 percent of its students. Brann’s new project is to save Inglewood from debt and plummeting enrollment rates.Wunder closed the event with information on the difficulties students are facing on the path from education to employment. He discussed how he and Brann are trying to improve this process for students through the Da Vinci Schools.Instead of being focused on test scores, Da Vinci Schools focus on habits of mind — such as character and perseverance — 21st century skills, presentational learning and public speaking skills.The speakers said that though there are 30 million Americans looking for work, there are also 5 million unfilled jobs across the country because applicants don’t have the skills employers are looking for.  There is a big discrepancy between what employees offer and what employers are looking for, and this has caused a huge employment crisis in America.This is one of the main reasons why Wunder and Brann helped found the Da Vinci Schools.  They aim to graduate students with the skills that employers are looking for in potential candidates.“Our education to employment pipeline doesn’t line up well with jobs,” Wunder said, “And so the transformation that we think needs to happen is that we connect the pipeline and we start with the end user, those employers.”last_img read more

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Women in tech: rising above

first_imgGaima found mentors, resources and support in the USC chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers.  “It’s this culture that’s taught toward people with … experience in this male-focused dominated industry,” Kanes said. “I passed with a 52% [in “Data Structure and Object Oriented Design”], and I got sick from that semester. It has been my goal for no woman to feel the way that I did [my freshman year].” “[AthenaHacks] was my seventh hackathon of that year … but [it] was the best one,” Lampotang said. “At the other hackathons, I always felt like it was a competition, and I was a kid that was walking in the race. But …  AthenaHacks felt like a group relay. Nobody was like, ‘You can’t look at what I’m doing.’” Yortsos said he is working to make the school more inclusive for women and minorities by offering resources and training faculty to recognize and eliminate their implicit biases.  AthenaHacks organizer Aliya Petranik, a senior majoring in computer science, said the gender ratio at a hackathon is an important factor in a hacker’s experience, especially for minorities in tech.  Women make up 26.5% of computing roles today, a step down from 36% in 1991, according to the National Center for Women and Information Technology. Across Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft, known as the “Big Five” within the tech industry, the number of female employees ranges between 29.2% and 41.23% according to the company’s most recent 2020 reports. While the Viterbi School of Engineering reached gender parity for the first time with the Class of 2023, under 40% of computer science students are women and even fewer transfer students are women, according to Viterbi Dean Yannis Yortsos. “It’s great that we’ve reached gender parity [in Viterbi] and all,” Lampotang said. “But if you have a bunch of women in a place where 50% of the women don’t feel comfortable or things aren’t accessible or open to them, and they feel like they don’t belong, then [you] haven’t done anything.” Luz Camacho, vice president of the membership committee of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, joined the organization because of the mentorship and friendship it offered her while navigating her freshman year.  “The gender balance in hackathons is still quite low,” Petranik said. “Women have this idea that they can only go if they’re going to be very competitive, if they know everything already. We’re trying to change that idea and promote the idea that you can learn how to build something at a hackathon.”  “You need to have many different views, particularly [as] technology and society are becoming intersected more and more,” said Yortsos, who described the technology industry as traditionally white- and male-dominated. “Ethics and technology ethics are very important.” Former Built By Girls ambassador Glory Kanes, a junior majoring in computer science and business administration, emailed Yortsos in her freshman year asking the dean if they could meet to discuss diversity and inclusion in computer science at USC. This sparked a series of meetings that continues today and now includes Cheyenne Gaima, a junior majoring in computer science and business administration.  Breaking from tradition, AthenaHacks consists of women of all backgrounds who build, break and try out tech at USC. Stephanie Lampotang, an AthenaHacks organizer, experienced the gender gap firsthand during her freshman year when she attended other hackathons. Yortsos also emphasized that Viterbi is not artificially increasing the number of women in its incoming classes but that the decreasing gender gap is the result of early structural change.  “I was extremely excited and so ready to start … but being some of the time — or most of the time — the only Black person in a lot of my classes, I just felt so alone,” Gaima said. “When I first immediately observed it, I realized I need to find a community.”  “There’s quite a fair amount of women in computer science [at USC],” said Camacho, a junior majoring in computer engineering and computer science. “In industry, the demographics are a little different, but at least here at USC … I think I was more aware of the fact that I was the only Latina in the room than I was aware of the fact that I was one of few women.” Being a minority in tech involves more than gender, as the racial gap in tech is even more prominent. Gaima said she faced related challenges in her first engineering courses.  “Glory and I pretty much brought it up to our dean that while we have a pretty high number of girls entering computer science at Viterbi, we are not retaining those girls,” Gaima said.  AthenaHacks is a USC hackathon launched in 2017 to address the gender gap in the tech industry. Last year, it had 450 attendees, making it the largest all-women collegiate hackathon in Southern California. With sleeping bags, energy drinks and laptops in tow, the attendees of AthenaHacks stream onto USC’s campus from all across the country every year to hunker down on a weekend technology project. They form small teams and attend workshops led by industry sponsors on tools to build virtual reality experiences, mobile apps and more. They listen to speakers, pitch their projects and win prizes, components of a typical hackathon. What’s not typical is that all of them — the organizers, guest speakers and participants — are women.  AthenaHacks participants attended workshops led by industry experts and discuss issues facing women in the technology sector Saturday and Sunday. The annual event draws over 450 attendees per year. (Design: Kitty Huang, Photo: Vincent Leo | Daily Trojan) AthenaHacks is a hackathon event that aims to address the gender gap in the technology industry. (Vincent Leo | Daily Trojan) Kanes, Gaima and Camacho all said they had experienced imposter syndrome in certain computer science classes notorious for their difficulty, where they felt other male students already had more coding experience and could relate to the professors more easily through similar interests like video games.  In 2015, Asian women held 5% of computing positions, Black women held 3% and Latinx women held 1%, according to NCWIT. On campus, there are a host of tech clubs and initiatives highlighting women in tech, including Girls in Tech, AthenaHacks, Women in Computing and Society of Women Engineers, in addition to national organizations that support girls starting in high school such as Built By Girls and Girls Who Code.  Until there’s a cultural change in tech, Kanes said, there will likely be no change in the future of the tech industry’s diversity. But clubs and programs can only put a Band-Aid on problems stemming from inequity in education. last_img read more

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What we learned from Syracuse football’s loss to N.C. State

first_imgSyracuse (4-6, 2-4 Atlantic Coast) struggled in its 35-20 loss to North Carolina State (5-5, 2-4), and made the last two games of its regular season must-wins to guarantee itself a bowl appearance. SU has its home finale against Florida State and its season finale at Pittsburgh still left.Check out what we learned from the loss to N.C. State.Alvin Cornelius can step up in Steve Ishmael’s placeAlvin Cornelius’ teammates refer to him as “Ace” and on Saturday, he filled the spot Steve Ishamel had vacated admirably. Although Ishmael wasn’t included on this week’s injury report, the wide receiver sat out Saturday’s game.“He was still a little banged up from the Clemson game. He practiced during the week and through it early in the week and as the week went, he just didn’t recover,” Syracuse head coach Dino Babers said. “He practiced on Tuesday, but then Wednesday didn’t recover well, Thursday didn’t recover well, and he just didn’t feel good about it so we went with Ace.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textCornelius tied Ervin Philips and Amba Etta-Tawo for the most passes caught by an SU receiver in the game with four and the senior tallied 61 yards. His best play was a 46-yard reception. Cornelius beat the cornerback deep and starting quarterback Zack Mahoney arced the ball into the wide receiver’s hands.“I think him on one of their DBs,” Mahoney said. “We liked that matchup.”Jessica Sheldon | Photo EditorChop block costs Syracuse at chance to tie gameSyracuse was driving with under 10 minutes to play and Mahoney nearly had another deep throw to Cornelius. Mahoney placed the ball in the back of the end zone and Cornelius came down with the 34-yard toss. But the referees had thrown flags in the backfield. After a short discussion, they called a chop block on backup center Donnie Foster, who had replaced Colin Byrne after the starting center left the game with an injury, and Dontae Strickland. An N.C. State pass rusher had beaten Foster and Strickland dove low as Foster pushed the defensive lineman.Pending a two-point conversion, the nullified touchdown could have tied Syracuse and North Carolina State. Instead, Mahoney was sacked on the next play, setting up a second-and-38. Somehow, the down marker was changed to a down later than it should have been. After an incompletion on second down, SU punted because the down marker read fourth and 38.MORE COVERAGE:Syracuse down to its last strike after loss against N.C. StateEric Dungey ‘probably doubtful’ against Florida StateGallery: The best photos from SU-NCSU “They did not (give an explanation). I’m not clear on all the stuff that went through right there. I was politely asked to leave the field so I obliged,” Babers clarified later.Strickland said he was just doing his job and what he was “taught to do” in picking up the extra defensive lineman when he came through.“There were a lot of critical calls that didn’t go our way, that’s part of the game. We won’t cry over spilled milk,” Babers said.“Those big fines, I can’t afford them. Those other guys can afford them. They called a chop block. The center got beat very quickly, the third-team center got beat very quickly and anytime that happens, the back’s got to compensate,” Babers added. “The back did a fantastic job of compensating and the official said that the center that got beat very badly put his hands back on the guy who was being blocked by our running back.” Published on November 13, 2016 at 2:00 pm Contact Chris: cjlibona@syr.edu | @ChrisLibonati Special teams’ effort wasted by offenseAfter struggling in the middle of the season, Syracuse punter Sterling Hofrichter has been stellar for SU down the stretch of the season. The Orange needed Hofricter six times on Saturday. The punter racked up 284 total yards and an average of 47.3 yards per punt. His longest flew 65 yards and he put two inside the 20-yard line.In addition to Hofricther’s punts, kick returner and wide receiver Sean Riley blocked a North Carolina State punt inside its own 20-yard line. Before SU had recovered, Riley started celebrating, jumped up and looked back toward the sideline. He and Shyheim Cullen brought extra pressure. SU began the ensuing possession on NCSU’s 17-yard line but came away with only a field goal.Although SU’s special teams proved to be solid on Saturday, Syracuse wasted the field position wins it did accrue. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Syracuse skids across season’s finish line with 42-14 loss to Boston College

first_imgZaire Franklin strolled out of the tunnel in the northwest corner of the Carrier Dome, an entrance unlike the rush he and his Syracuse teammates usually make when taking the field every home game. This time, Franklin went slow, because being the final participant in the Senior Day festivities meant he could. He glanced at every angle of the stadium that’s housed his collegiate football career.Franklin hugged Syracuse head coach Dino Babers. He dapped up injured quarterback Eric Dungey. He greeted his family. For the three-time captain, it appeared memorable. Most everything after that moment wasn’t.The defense Franklin anchors as middle linebacker was again lit up in Syracuse’s (4-8, 2-6 Atlantic Coast) 42-14 loss to Boston College (7-5, 4-4). The Eagles put up 581 yards of total offense with a backup quarterback and a freshman running back. On a day where SU had little to prove, it showed the announced 30,202 fans in attendance the conclusion of a devastating slide to end the season.“We came in, played hard, left it all out on the field,” Franklin said. “At the end of the day, that’s the way the cookie crumbles. It’s unfortunate, but at this point, that’s what happens.”Syracuse came into the game with its collective setbacks. Injuries limited its starting backfield, Dungey and junior running back Dontae Strickland, to playing catch in sweatpants during pregame. A redshirt freshman in Rex Culpepper started at quarterback, a decision Babers said he made because he wanted to evaluate players who will be on the team next year. There was no hope of reaching a bowl game, but SU had to play.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe loss sent SU’s downward spiral deeper than anyone would have liked to imagine back on Oct. 13, the night the Carrier Dome was at its wildest. Since beating Clemson that night, the Orange lost its final five games and for the second straight year went winless in November. The last three, when the margin for error shrunk to nothing, were especially ugly, with SU allowing point totals of 64, 56 and 42. Promise turned to despair, and for SU’s seniors like Franklin, the brightest moment in their career doubled as their last taste of victory. Comments Published on November 25, 2017 at 3:38 pm Contact: jtbloss@syr.edu | @jtbloss Babers, though, made it so the senior’s final strides on the turf weren’t walking away from defeat. After addressing his team in the locker room, he told them to go back out and take one more final lap around the field to recall years of better memories. It would be the beginning of a tradition, Babers said, because the recreational opportunities that exist in other sports — like softball leagues and pick-up hoops — won’t be there for his guys.“When a football player retires from college, there’s nowhere to go,” Babers said. “Twenty-two guys aren’t playing in the park with pads.”The moments rushed back. For Franklin, his first practice, first step in the Dome and first snap — when he and fellow linebacker Parris Bennett were thrown in on a goal-line stand against Villanova and allowed a touchdown — all came to mind. He called it a “trip down memory lane.”Bennett had all four years hit him at once. He thought about how fast it all went. He saw his mother, who drove from Detroit to every single home game, still in the Dome.“I saw that,” Bennett said, “and I kind of broke down.”The nostalgia removed the seniors from the immediate sting of losing their final game, one in which BC set the tone early. The Eagles capped their opening drive of 12 plays with the first carry of the afternoon for freshman running back A.J. Dillon, a 22-yard dash into the end zone. On the next BC possession, Dillon darted right and rode the sideline for 50 yards, only to finish the job with an eight-yard touchdown scamper three plays later.Dillon finished with 193 yards and three touchdowns on 23 carries. On the opening drive of the second half, he ran from the Orange’s one-yard line and nonchalantly placed the ball over the goal line. No one tackled him. It was as if he grew bored of the smashmouth running the Eagles used to plow through SU in the first half.Such an output from the 6-foot, 240-pound running back wasn’t shocking. Including a 39-carry, four-touchdown performance five weeks ago in BC’s win at Louisville, Dillon had posted rushing totals of 272, 89, 149, 196 and 200 yards in his last five games prior to Saturday, respectively.“He’s going to be around for hopefully two more years, not three,” Babers said, referring to Dillon’s NFL potential.Syracuse, meanwhile, hinted its best seniors could contribute to one last win. Steve Ishmael caught a ball on a short crossing route in the first quarter and went basically untouched for a 37-yard touchdown. In the second quarter, he tiptoed the sideline and hauled in a 44-yarder over his shoulders, setting up a 17-yard touchdown to fellow senior receiver Ervin Philips. Together, the two have smashed a few receiving records in Syracuse history, and they showed why on Saturday.But that was it for the offense, which totaled 417 yards of production but just the two scores to show for it. Culpepper frequently misfired on his attempts, by quite a bit. A second-quarter heave landed in the hands of BC cornerback Lukas Denis, nowhere near an SU receiver. Earlier, a broken-up screen pass tumbled to the turf with no whistle to signal the end of the play. So an Eagle picked it up and ran for a touchdown and a 28-7 lead.“It was a beautiful opportunity, and a chance to step up and play,” Culpepper said. “We definitely didn’t get the result that we wanted.”After a second half comprising much of the same, the final seconds ticked off Syracuse’s season. Devin C. Butler dropped a pass, and the jeers from the few fans who remained rung louder in the hollow Dome.Then Culpepper fumbled, and Franklin and his defense had to go back on the field for meaningless plays until the clock struck zero. Yet with five seconds left, Babers called timeout. One by one, he called off the seniors to shake their hands, Bennett and Franklin among them.For that final play, instead of participating, they watched. It’s something they’ll have to get used to. 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WWE Hell In a Cell: Kabuki Warriors are Women’s Tag Team Champions

first_img Written By WWE Hell In a Cell PPV housed some exciting matches and one of them was the match for the WWE Women’s Tag-team Championship. Champions Alexa Bliss and Nikki Cross faced the Kabuki Warriors – Asuka and Kairi Sane. The Kabuki Warriors ended up winning the match after Asuka ended up pulling out a trick from her sleeve. Let us what unfolded in the Hell in a Cell match. ALSO READ | WWE Hell in a Cell results: Reigns and Bryan defeat Harper and RowanWWE Hell in a Cell: The Kabuki Warriors make their intentions clear FOLLOW US SUBSCRIBE TO US The booking for the match happened on the day of Hell in a Cell Pay-per-view. The Kabuki Warriors were chosen as the competitors because they were the last team to be eliminated when Bliss and Cross won the titles in August.ALSO READ | Brock Lesnar to Bobby Lashley, wrestlers who have excelled outside WWE Last Updated: 7th October, 2019 12:46 IST WWE Hell In A Cell: Kabuki Warriors Are Women’s Tag Team Champions In the WWE Hell in a Cell 2019 PPV, The Kabuki Warriors defeated Alexa Bliss and Nikki Cross to win the WWE Women’s Tag Team Championship. Read more First Published: 7th October, 2019 12:46 IST WATCH US LIVE LIVE TV COMMENT The match started with Kairi offering a handshake to Nikki Cross who was starting the match for her. The handshake was only a trick to attack Nikki and Alexa. The Kabuki Warriors then proceeded to dominate the match for most of its length. Bliss and Cross had some comebacks but not too many.  ALSO READ | WWE Hell in a Cell 2019 results: Becky Lynch takes down Sasha BanksIn another attempt to cheat, Kairi walked over to Nikki Cross who was by the turnbuckle and attacked her while Bliss was being hit by Asuka. Kairi then came back and got a pin on Alexa Bliss but the referee was too busy trying to control an agitated Nikki Cross on the side. Cross and Bliss then tried to get some momentum back but Asuka then used the Green Mist on Nikki Cross and pinned her to win the championship.  ALSO READ | WWE RAW: Charlotte Flair’s toughest in-ring competitors in the WWEWWE Hell in a Cell: Why were they fighting? Mrigank Pandey last_img read more

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Stars score 4 in third, rally past Coyotes 4-2

first_img First Published: 30th December, 2019 10:32 IST Written By COMMENT Last Updated: 30th December, 2019 10:32 IST Stars Score 4 In Third, Rally Past Coyotes 4-2 Roope Hintz scored the go-ahead goal late in Dallas’ four-goal third period, and the Stars rallied past the Arizona Coyotes 4-2 on Sunday night. FOLLOW US Roope Hintz scored the go-ahead goal late in Dallas’ four-goal third period, and the Stars rallied past the Arizona Coyotes 4-2 on Sunday night.Hintz’s team-leading 13th goal of the season made it 3-2 with 4:09 left to play, and Mattias Janmark sealed the Stars’ second straight win with an empty-netter with 1:36 remaining.Jamie Benn had a goal and an assist, Alexander Radulov also scored, and Anton Khudobin stopped 33 shots for the Stars.Conor Garland had a goal and assist for Arizona, and Taylor Hall scored his first goal at home this season for his new team less after being acquired from New Jersey on Dec 16.The Coyotes have lost three straight in regulation for the first time this season.Hall stuffed in a bouncing puck that was knocked down by Garland after Hall delivered a hit on Dallas defenseman Jamie Oleksiak in the right corner to get the Coyotes on the scoreboard at 8:42 of the first.Janmark left briefly after he took a hit from Hall and his left knee appeared to collide with Hall as Hall turned his hip. Janmark was helped off the ice and taken to the dressing room, where he sat out the final 3:52 of the period before returning in the second.Garland made it 2-0 with a wrist shot high into the net from the side after Nick Schmaltz fed a loose puck to him with 1:58 to go in the openng period. Garland raised his team-leading goal total to 13 and Schmaltz got his 25th assist of the season, also a team high.The Coyotes outshot the Stars 22-5 in the first period.A scoreless second period saw more physical play, with Oleksiak originally given a five-minute penalty for a jarring shoulder-first hit on Arizona’s Derek Stepan. The play was reviewed and changed to a two-minute interference penalty, which drew boos from the crowd.Stepan left the game and didn’t return with what was announced as an upper body injury.Raanta came up with a save of Oleksiak’s breakaway shot as Oleksiak came out of the penalty box at 15:06 of the second. But Raanta — a night after giving up four goals on 16 shots and being pulled from the game at Vegas — couldn’t keep the lead in the third nd finished with 21 saves.NOTES: Coyotes F Vinnie Hinostroza missed his first game of the season, designated a healthy scratch. … Arizona D Jordan Oesterle was also scratched, missing his first game since Nov. 7. … The two teams met for the first time this season and will play twice more. … The Stars have won 10 of the last 11 meetings and 15 of 19 with Arizona. center_img SUBSCRIBE TO US WATCH US LIVE Associated Press Television News LIVE TVlast_img read more

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Mexican GP: Verstappen Loses Pole after Grid Penalty

first_imgIn front of him, Vettel had slowed down for the flags, a decision that he believed cost him a shot at fastest time.Verstappen’s quickest lap beat Leclerc by 0.266 seconds – and his first run was 0.114secs faster than the Monegasque.Hamilton, who will win the championship one Sunday if he finishes 14 points ahead of Bottas, starts third, with Red Bull’s Alexander Albon still fifth but now right behind his team-mate.Hamilton improved his overall lap time on his final run, on which he was running behind Bottas and passed his crashed car, but crucially he did not go faster in the final sector – in fact, he slowed down.And Vettel expressed his dismay at the turn of events as he saw the flags, saying over the radio: “You’re kidding me. That was going to be a good lap.”Later, Vettel said of the incident: “For me it was clear it was double yellow. I saw Valtteri was in the barrier, people were jumping on the track to help. It was clear you had to lift.”Initially, stewards did not investigate the incident with Verstappen, even though television pictures showed him passing a yellow flag and Bottas’s car without slowing down.But after he admitted in the news conference that he was “aware Valtteri crashed” but did not slow down, he was summoned to see the stewards.Bottas crashed as he ran wide out of the final corner trying to make up time, sliding into the barriers and causing considerable damage to his car. The Finn was released from the medical centre after a precautionary check-up.It was a blow for the Finn as he tries to prevent Hamilton putting the championship out of reach. But starting third, it is still a big task for Hamilton to make as much of a gain on Bottas as he needs to clinch his sixth title.Hamilton needs to finish on the podium at least and hope Bottas’ results go his way.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Red Bull’s Max Verstappen has been demoted from pole position at the Mexican Grand Prix by a penalty for ignoring warning flags.The Dutchman was given a three-place grid drop and will start fourth, behind Ferrari’s Charles Leclerc and Sebastian Vettel and Mercedes’ Lewis Hamilton.Verstappen failed to slow down for yellow caution flags after a crash by Hamilton’s team-mate Valtteri Bottas. The error cost Verstappen pole, as his first lap was also fastest of anyone.last_img read more

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