San Diego Police leaders defend use of controversial neck restraint

first_img Updated: 11:46 AM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Some community members asked the San Diego Police Department to take a closer look at the use of a tactic called a “carotid restraint.” While critics say the practice isn’t safe, the department says the neck hold can be an effective policing tool, as an intermediate force tactic and a non-lethal use of force.A recent review by the police department found that the carotid restraint was used more than 400 times over a five year period between 2013 and 2017.Lieutenant Jim Jordon from the San Diego Police Department says a choke hold that pushes against the windpipe isn’t legal, but the vascular neck hold which obstructs blood flow, not air flow can be effectively used in cases involving assaultive or combative subjects. The technique applies pressure to the blood vessels on the side of the neck, until the person loses consciousness.The police department’s review last September revealed that the carotid restraint was used 58 percent of the time on subjects who were actively resisting and 28 percent in situations that also involved alcohol or narcotics. The carotid restraint was applied on African America subjects in 25 percent of the incidents. African Americans are 6 and a half percent of the city’s population.Community members have expressed reservations about the safety of the hold and whether the restraint could lead to death.  The department said it did not know of any incidents that resulted in death or significant injury.The police department said based on its review, it will continue to use the carotid restraint, although it will make some policy changes to sure the practice is safe. Those revisions include an annual review of the use of force, more frequent police training on the neck hold, taking subjects to whom the restraint was applied to a hospital for a medical evaluation and banning the use of the tactic on high risk individuals such as the elderly, those who are st obviously juveniles and pregnant women.The carotid restraint puts pressure on each side of the suspect’s neck, as shown in the photo below. FacebookTwitter May 20, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News Sasha Foo Posted: May 20, 2019 San Diego Police leaders defend use of controversial neck restraint Sasha Foo, last_img read more

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NYSE Resumes Trading after 4hour Halt due to Outage

first_imgThe New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) resumed floor trading after more than a three-hour halt on Wednesday due to an undisclosed technical problem, officials said.NYSE halted trading in all securities starting from 11.32 a.m. on Wednesday.NYSE and US officials reported it as a technical issue and not the result of a cyber-attack, Xinhua reported.The Federal Bureau of Investigation said no law enforcement action is needed at NYSE.The White House confirmed that there was no indication of cyber-attacks in the trade suspension of the NYSE.”At this point, there is no indication that malicious actors were involved in these technology issues,” said Josh Earnest, the White House spokesman.The trading halt came in the middle of a selloff in US stocks that was fuelled by concerns over Greece’s uncertainty.However, trading of NYSE securities on other platforms, including NASDAQ, was unaffected. Investors could still buy and sell NYSE-listed stocks at other venues.The NYSE problem came soon after the United Airlines grounded planes at US airports for two hours due to a computer glitch.The website of Wall Street Journal was also temporarily out of use for a while around mid-day for technical difficulties, and was resumed shortly.last_img read more

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Physicist creates ice cream that changes colors as its licked

first_imgCredit: Cocinatis Spanish physicist, engineer, professor and ice cream lover Manuel Linares has together with a couple of colleagues created an ice cream that changes colors when it’s licked—in a cone. Not content with the life of a physics professor, Linares signed up for training with Asociación Empresarial Nacional de Elaboradores Artesanos y Comerciantes de Helados y Horchatas—a craftsmen and businessmen association in Spain that offers mentored coursework. Uber brings back on-demand ice cream trucks Explore further © 2014 Phys.orgcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Physicist creates ice cream that changes colors as it’s licked (2014, July 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-07-physicist-ice-cream.html Linares pursued what he has described as a “Masters Diploma in Creating Artisan Ice Cream.” Intrigued by the ice that changes color under fluorescent lights, created by Charlie Francis, Linares set his sights on figuring out a way to create a type of ice cream that would change color in response to temperature changes and acids found in the human mouth. He enlisted the assistance of a couple of unnamed buddies and they all got to work in a lab that Linares put together with his own funds. Linares has told the press that it took the three of them just one week to come up with the color changing ice cream. The final product, which reportedly has a similar taste to tutti-frutti, has been named Xamaleón. The color changing comes about, some suspect due to the types of fruit that are used—plus a secondary ingredient, a spritz called the “love elixir” that gets sprayed onto the ice cream after its been scooped into a cone, which Linares has hinted, accelerates the color changing process. It starts out as periwinkle blue, then changes to pink and eventually becomes purple, as it’s licked.The ice cream is made of all natural materials, Linares has revealed, but other than listing some of the normal ingredients found in regular ice cream, he’s kept mum. That’s because he has big plans for the ice cream. He’s already opened a shop in Blanes, his hometown, with the goal of creating many more types of exotic ice cream, such as a variety that mimics the ice created by Francis, and another he’s already named Xamán—it will be made with Peruvian and African medicinal plants which will supposedly provide an aphrodisiac effect.last_img read more

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