Sex worker further remanded on armed robbery charge

first_imgNineteen-year-old Godfrey Cox of Princes Street, Georgetown was on Friday further remanded to prison by Georgetown Magistrate Leron Daly when he reappeared in her court charged with the offence of armed robbery.The sex worker had pleaded not guilty to the charge when he was first arraigned before the magistrate earlier this month. The charge states that on June 20, 2018, at King and Charlotte Streets, Georgetown, while being armed with a knife, he robbed David Harvey of $65,000 in cash. Harvey was reportedly heading to the Shell Gas Station on Regent Street, Georgetown to pay workers when the defendant attacked him, held him at knifepoint, and relieved him of the cash that was in his pants pocket.The prosecutor objected to Cox being placed on bail based on the seriousness of the offence and the fact that the defendant has other matters of a similar nature pending in court.Magistrate Daly has further remanded Cox to August 27, 2018.last_img read more

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How we can fight child labour in the tobacco industry

first_imgAbout this content Was this helpful? Hide There is evidence of child labor in the tobacco industry at least 16 countries, according to the US labor department’s bureau of international labor affairs (ILAB): Americas: Argentina, Brazil, Nicaragua, MexicoAfrica: Uganda, Kenya, Malawi, Zambia, Mozambique, TanzaniaMiddle East: LebanonAsia: Cambodia, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam, Kyrgyz RepublicAdditionally, human rights groups have identified child labor in Zimbabwe and the USA.Around the world, there are estimates of 1.3 million children being involved in some form of tobacco industry labour. Last year, the UN’s International Labour Organi​zation (ILO) said the numbers were rising with a shift in tobacco growing from some of the wealthier countries to some of the poorer. The figures declined between 2000 and 2013 in Turkey, Brazil and the United States, said the report to the organisation’s governing body in February 2017, but they increased in others, such as Argentina, India and Zimbabwe. Shares4646 The incremental changes we’ve seen are encouraging, but it’s hard to keep hearing the same stories of sickness and suffering by child workers on tobacco farms year after year. By next month, the tobacco growing season will be under way in Indonesia and the United States, and in a few months, farmers in Zimbabwe will begin planting next year’s crop. Brazil points to a way forward. Governments should enact strict regulations and provide extensive health information and training to protect tobacco workers from harm. Tobacco companies should explicitly prohibit children from contact with tobacco in any form, carry out regular and rigorous human rights monitoring in the supply chain, and report transparently on their efforts. The health and wellbeing of child workers all over the world hangs in the balance. Margaret Wurth and Jane Buchanan are children’s rights experts at Human Rights Watch Q&A How hazardous are tobacco farming conditions? Wed 27 Jun 2018 03.00 EDT Child labour Share via Email Tobacco: activist investors pressure £20bn companies over child labour Show Last modified on Thu 5 Jul 2018 18.00 EDT comment Was this helpful? Many of the world’s most popular brands of cigarettes may contain tobacco produced by vulnerable child workers. Over the last five years, we have investigated labor conditions and human rights problems on tobacco farms in four of the world’s top 10 tobacco-producing countries. We found that children work in hazardous conditions on farms supplying some of the world’s largest multinational tobacco companies. But Brazil, the world’s second-largest tobacco producer, provides a positive example for tackling hazardous child labor. Brazil barred children under 18 from any work with tobacco in 2008 and established penalties for child labor violations – not just for farmers, but for the companies purchasing their leaf. Though the labor ministry was understaffed and lacked the resources to carry out sufficient inspections, the farmers we interviewed understood that children were not permitted to work and feared the penalties. The government also provided extensive information to tobacco farmers about the hazards of nicotine and pesticide exposure, particularly for children. Unlike in Zimbabwe, the small-scale farmers in Brazil were informed about the health risks and knew their children shouldn’t be working in the fields. Tiyamike Phiri, 14, at work on a tobacco plot in Kasungu district, Malawi.Photograph: David Levene/The Guardian Twitter Share on WhatsApp Tobacco: a deadly business Tobacco: a deadly business Thank you for your feedback. Thank you for your feedback. Share on Pinterest Q&A Tobacco industry: in what countries is there evidence of child labor? Topics Pinterest Share on LinkedIncenter_img Supported by Share on Twitter Share on Twitter In the United States, the world’s fourth-largest tobacco producer, weak labor laws and regulations allow the hiring of children as young as 12 to work unlimited hours on farms of any size – including in tobacco fields – as long as they don’t miss school. Child workers told us about working 12-hour days in extreme heat, topping or harvesting tobacco plants. Many of them complained of suffering nausea, vomiting, headaches, and dizziness while they worked – all symptoms consistent with acute nicotine poisoning, or green tobacco sickness, from nicotine being absorbed through the skin while handling tobacco. “It felt like there was something in my head trying to eat it,” one 12-year-old worker said, describing the headaches he got while he worked.Indonesia, the fifth-largest tobacco producer globally, has more than half a million tobacco farms. Most are small, family-run plots, and we found that children often work alongside their parents and neighbors, harvesting and carrying tobacco leaves and preparing them for curing. Many complained that they had the same symptoms. “I threw up so many times,” said one 13-year-old worker. Most recently, in Zimbabwe, the sixth-largest tobacco producer, we found that both child and adult workers faced serious health risks and labor abuses on tobacco farms. Tobacco is the country’s most valuable export commodity and a pillar of a troubled economy. But we found that some child workers sacrificed their health and education to work on tobacco farms. Though nearly everyone we interviewed had experienced symptoms of nicotine poisoning, almost no one had ever heard of it or knew how to protect themselves. The firms insist they do give training. Tobacco industry Facebook Child labor has not been completely eliminated in Brazil, but there has been progress in keeping children out of hazardous work and protecting adult workers. The contrast between what we found in Brazil, as compared with the US, Indonesia, and Zimbabwe, is striking and suggests that when governments regulate the industry and hold companies accountable, progress can be made. Many of the same companies purchase from all of these markets. The Brazil example shows that strong laws and regulations can help companies take action to reduce child labor and human rights problems. Show … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. How we can fight child labour in the tobacco industry Our research, new reporting in the Guardian, and reports by researchers and nongovernmental organizations including Swedwatch and the Farm Labor Organizing Committee (Floc) suggest that hazardous child labor, labor rights abuses, and other serious human rights problems persist in these companies’ global supply chains. Hide Farming tobacco to produce the leaf that fills cigarettes can involve: Gruelling physical labour using heavy hoes, and sharp tools, on rows of plants Nicotine poisoning or green tobacco sickness through handling the leaves, causing nausea, vomiting, headaches and dizziness Exposure to toxic pesticides and fertilisers, sometimes without proper protection Exposure to the sun and high heat for long hoursFor some workers and families, a lack of access to good sanitation or places to live and sleep away from the tobacco fieldsTobacco firms say they ban under 18s from hazardous work. Brazil, the world’s second-largest tobacco producer, provides a positive example for tackling hazardous child labor Since you’re here… Tobacco industry Share on Facebook Margaret Wurth and Jane Buchanan of Human Rights Watch The world’s largest multinational tobacco product manufacturers, including the UK giants British American Tobacco (maker of Lucky Strike, Camel, and Dunhill) and Imperial Brands (maker of Davidoff and Gauloises Blondes), source from these and other tobacco-growing countries. The firms say that they are doing everything they can to end exploitative child labor, stop abuses in their supply chains and have policies to safeguard workers. Human Rights Watch has been in regular contact with many tobacco companies since we started this work. Several companies have adopted new policies or strengthened existing polices to prohibit suppliers from allowing children to do dangerous tasks on farms. But no company prohibits those under 18 from all work involving direct contact with tobacco in any form – the policy that would offer the greatest protection, in line with international standards. Most companies maintain that their policies are carried out throughout global supply chains, but we believe many do not report transparently about their monitoring and what they find. Without this information, we have to take their word for it that they’re doing enough to address rights abuses in their supply chains. Companies should provide credible, transparent information on human rights problems and steps they take to fix them. Our investigations at Human Rights Watch show how widely child labour is used worldwide – but Brazil sets a better example Share on Facebook Share via Email Tobacco fields in Mchinji, Malawi. Photograph: David Levene/The Guardian Read more Support The Guardian Share on Messenger Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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