Job Vacancy: Popular local supermarket seeks staff

first_imgJob Vacancy: Simpsons Supermarket, Carndonagh, Co. Donegal are seeking enthusiastic, hardworking individuals to come join their team.Management are currently recruiting for a full-time checkout/sales assistant and full-time deli assistant.Checkout/Sales AssistantREQUIREMENTS: Exceptional customer service skillsGreat attention to detailYou will also be required to stock shelves and maintain a clean and tidy environment in the storePrevious retail customer service experience is essentialDeli AssistantREQUIREMENTS:Previous experience in food service is essentialApplicants for both positions must be reliable with a mature attitude and demonstrate:A passion for the delivery of excellent customer serviceEnjoyment in working as part of a high performance teamAn ability to learn quicklyAn ability to work under pressure in a fast moving environmentA flexible attitude towards working hoursEXPERIENCE AND FLEXIBILITY ARE ESSENTIAL. MUST BE OVER 18 YEARS OF AGE. To apply, send your CV to simpsonscarn@gmail.com or drop a CV into the shop.Job Vacancy: Popular local supermarket seeks staff was last modified: August 11th, 2017 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Biometric cards to beat social grant fraud

first_img14 June 2012South Africa has begun rolling out a new biometric card to social grant beneficiaries that will cut down on fraud and corruption in the country’s grants system, improve on the delivery of grants, and reduce the costs involved in making payouts.Between June and December, the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) will hand out the new, branded, biometric magstripe cards to grant holders, replacing the current Sekulula cards.The biometric cards will also replace temporary smart cards that social grant beneficiaries in Gauteng, Western Cape, the southern part of the Eastern Cape, Mpumalanga and Free State – provinces which don’t use the current service provider – have been using since March.The first phase of the project, which began in March and ended in May, saw new beneficiaries being enrolled onto the new system.Second phase under wayThe second phase, which began this month and will end in December, will see existing eligible beneficiaries, including bank beneficiaries and children, being enrolled on to the new system at SASSA pay points, local offices and designated sites.SASSA will conduct home visits to those older than 75 years old as well as for bedridden beneficiaries at their homes and institutions such as hospitals.Beneficiaries of the child support grant will be required to bring their babies, along with their birth certificates, for re-registration. The child’s fingerprints will be taken to verify his or her identity. Beneficiaries will then be issued with a SASSA-branded smart card.The new cards, and the verification process attached to the issuing of the cards, will help SASSA to reduce the incidence of fraud and corruption, over which Auditor-General Terence Nombembe has repeatedly raised concern.A 2008 report by the Institute of Security Studies estimated that before the commencement of investigations by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) in 2006, the government had been losing about R1.5-billion a year through corruption and the maladministration of social grants.The risk of fraud and corruption is ever more important, with the 15.7-million social grant beneficiaries registered as of 30 April this year expected to grow to 16.8-million in three years.Progress in reducing fraudulent beneficiariesHowever, in recent years, SASSA has made several advances in reducing the incidence of fraudulent grant beneficiaries.Between 2006 and March 2012, the SIU was able to prosecute 20 554 people for fraud and corruption relating to grants, which resulted in 17 880 convictions.In all, 46 237 individuals who have been incorrectly receiving social grants have signed acknowledgement of debts totaling R304.9-million.Individuals that sign acknowledgement of debts, which has the effect of a civil court order, commit to repaying the money received in installments that are financially viable for them.To this end, a total of 132 603 beneficiaries have been verified for eligibility and existence and 7 133 were found to be fraudulent.Kgomoco Diseko, SASSA’s senior manager: media relations, said grants paid to the 7 133 beneficiaries who defrauded the system had been cancelled and criminal charges had also been brought against them.Monitoring irregular practices by employees, publicSASSA has also successfully implemented its integrity model, which serves to address and monitor irregular practices by both its employees and the public.Diseko says the integrity model represents a more proactive fraud management approach which encapsulates all aspects of fraud management, namely prevention, detection, investigation and resolution.“Its emphasis is on regulating the behavior of staff, while improving systems and processes,” Diseko says. “The greatest feature of the model is the integrity policy, which allows the agency to conduct random checks on its high risk employees to determine their level of integrity.”The agency is also participating in anti-corruption forums driven by the Department of Home Affairs.The Department of Social Development will also be setting up an inspectorate to help the department weed out fraud.R30-million anti-fraud inspectorate to be set upSocial Development Minister Bathabile Dlamini said in her budget vote in May that R30-million had been allocated to set up an inspectorate, which is expected to be up and running by 2015.Also in May, Dlamini told Parliament that an Inspectorate Establishment Framework had been developed, as well as the Inspectorate Programme Management Unit structure comprising various functional work streams.“The process to recruit specialists and work stream project managers is at an advanced stage,” Dlamini said.She said the inspectorate unit was currently in the process to commission various research projects, and had prioritised the Comprehensive Legislation Review Project as well as the Systems Integrity Evaluation baseline study.“This will enable office to determine the actual levels of fraud and misconduct and help to project savings for the South African Social Security Agency, once the Inspectorate is fully legislated and adequately resourced to commence with the execution of its investigative mandate,” Dlamini said.Over R104-million in fraudulent grants recoveredMarika Muller, the SIU’s acting head of communications, says that since the SIU’s investigation into the SASSA began in April 2005, the unit has helped the government recover over R104.6-million.She says the SIU is still collecting an average of over R2.3-million a month in cash repayments from those who claimed grants irregularly.The SIU has recommended to SASSA that it remove all improperly received grants, involving savings to the government (and the taxpayer) of over R1-billion, and the prevention of future losses of over R11.8-billion.Three types of wrongful beneficiaryMuller says individuals receiving grants to which they are not entitled generally fall into three categories. These include individuals who have been found to have purposely lied about their income, employment status and or state of health in order to receive grants.They also include individuals who initially qualified to receive a grant, but then saw an improvement in their financial status which generally disqualified them from receiving grants.In many cases these individuals do not notify the SASSA of this change in status in order for their grant to be stopped; in some cases, they are not aware they needed to do so, says Muller.Finally, there are individuals who are receiving social grants as a result of errors in the process.Muller says that in the first category of individuals – those who purposely lied about details to gain access to grants – the SIU concludes initial investigations before handing the cases over to the SAPS for a decision on further action.Criminal charges, she explains, are also laid in instances where individuals had gone more than 12 months without notifying SASSA of their change in circumstances.“A decision was made with SASSA and other role players that criminal charges would not be laid against individuals who did not understand the reporting obligation, or who erroneously received grants as a result of process errors.“These individuals are, however, required to pay back the money they were not entitled to, either in a lump sum or installments through an AoD (acknowledgement of debt),” says Muller.Biometric cards to save R800-million a yearThere are also other benefits to the new biometric cards. For instance, the new smart cards will allow beneficiaries to access grants through multiple channels across the country, such as points of sale, banks, merchants and cash pay points.Dlamini said in her budget vote speech that the new payment system would help the government save R800-million a year.The new system provides for a service fee of R16.44, totaling R2-billion collectively in fees a year – R800-million less than the total fees generated by the former service provider.However, the former service provider, All Pay, has launched a court bid to have the current contract, run by Cash Paymaster Services, set aside, alleging irregularities in the tender process.The Legal Resources Centre has joined the case as an amicus curiae over concern that the court action may disrupt the disbursement of grants and SASSA’s verification process.Sarah Sephton a lawyer from the Legal Resources Centre, says Judge Elias Matojane had assured the court that interim processes would be considered should a ruling be made to halt the tender.In 2000, Sephton assisted thousands of grant beneficiaries in the Eastern Cape in a class action case against then minister of social development, Zola Skweyiya, after a botched verification process, intended to consolidate grant beneficiaries from the former homelands of the Transkei and the Ciskei and old Cape Province, resulted in thousands not being able to obtain disability grants.However, SASSA had assured Sephton that there would be no disruption in the disbursement of grants with the current verification process.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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Police ask telecom companies to suspend 3G and 4G services in Kashmir Valley

first_imgThe Jammu and Kashmir police has directed telecom companies to shut their 3G and 4G services in the Kashmir Valley as the state authorities feel there has been an attempt to spread fear and show security personnel in a bad light through online videos.The decision was taken after several videos surfaced in recent days, some showing local politicians being threatened by terrorists in various parts of the Valley and others which showed alleged atrocities by Army, police, CRPF or other para-military forces deputed for Parliamentary bye-elections.Officials said that it appears that such videos were being circulated with an aim to create fear among people or show the security personnel in poor light.Controversy peaked when a video showing a man tied to an army jeep in Budgam district of central Kashmir on April 9 surfaced when polling was underway for the Srinagar Parliamentary bypoll.A case has been registered against unknown army personnel for the alleged act which received wide criticism.There were videos showing traders and political leaders in Pulwama of South Kashmir being threatened by terrorists at gun point.“Such videos are only aimed at creating scare in general public,” a senior police official said.Internet services had been barred in the Valley keeping in view the sensitive Srinagar bypoll and were restored on April 13.last_img read more

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Asian Games: Ritu Rani believes in her golden destiny

first_imgRitu Rani has a dream – that she’ll put the poverty of her family behind her; that the team she captains, the Indian women’s hockey team, will succeed in reaching and winning a medal at the 2016 Rio di Janeiro Olympics.A gold medal in Incheon will guarantee the women an appearance in Brazil, though it’s easier said than done as strong countries like South Korea and China are also in fray.At the flag-hoisting ceremony at the Games Village on Thursday, Ritu was initially pensive as the athletes waited to enter the huge ground. After the formalities were over, the star player from Shahbad couldn’t stop talking about how the hard work put in by the team was on the verge of paying off.”Hamaara din aane waala hai [our day is about to come],” she said.Life has not been easy for Ritu. Unlike the pampered Indian cricketers, she has had to slog on and off the field. Ritu isn’t afraid to state that she comes from a poor family and that her father is a cart-puller. “I can never forget my background. I am the bread winner and I support the family as well with a salary of `11,000,” said Ritu, who works in the Indian Railways as a clerk in Shahbad.In order to earn a better living, the India captain says she is not averse to moving out of Shahbad. “But it has to be a government job,” is her only condition.last_img
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Lead up to the TRC closing events InFocus

first_imgAPTN InFocus with Cheryl McKenzie:In this edition we hear how churches and religious organizations have united under KAIROS.Together they’re working for reconciliation to reverse the attitudes of the past that encouraged the assimilation of Indigenous children through Canada’s residential schools.We also hear how Saskatoon’s Tribal Council is commemorating the closing of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.last_img

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A novel way to put flame retardant in a lithium ion battery

first_img Schematic illustration for the fabrication of the microfibers by electrospinning. Credit: Liu et al. Sci. Adv. 2017;3:e1601978 More information: Kai Liu et al. Electrospun core-shell microfiber separator with thermal-triggered flame-retardant properties for lithium-ion batteries, Science Advances (2017). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1601978AbstractAlthough the energy densities of batteries continue to increase, safety problems (for example, fires and explosions) associated with the use of highly flammable liquid organic electrolytes remain a big issue, significantly hindering further practical applications of the next generation of high-energy batteries. We have fabricated a novel “smart” nonwoven electrospun separator with thermal-triggered flame-retardant properties for lithium-ion batteries. The encapsulation of a flame retardant inside a protective polymer shell has prevented direct dissolution of the retardant agent into the electrolyte, which would otherwise have negative effects on battery performance. During thermal runaway of the lithium-ion battery, the protective polymer shell would melt, triggered by the increased temperature, and the flame retardant would be released, thus effectively suppressing the combustion of the highly flammable electrolytes. Safer, more environmentally friendly flame retardant with first-of-its-kind dual effects SEM image of the TPP@PVDF-HFP microfibers. Scale bar, 5 μm. Credit: Liu et al. Sci. Adv. 2017;3:e1601978 Schematic of the “smart” electrospun separator with thermal-triggered flame-retardant properties for lithium-ion batteries. Credit: Liu et al. Sci. Adv. 2017;3:e1601978 Reports of phones and hoverboards catching fire due to short circuits in batteries have caused alarm in the personal electronics industry—both by users and those that make the devices. Unfortunately, up until now, engineers have not been able to solve the problem completely. Most such efforts involve re-engineering devices to prevent short-circuiting and thus overheating, or attempting to put flame retardant directly in the batteries. Neither approach has proven to be entirely satisfactory. Re-engineering does not always solve the problem and the addition of flame retardant greatly reduces battery efficiency. In this new effort, the researchers describe an approach that thus far appears to offer some help—it does not stop overheating from occurring, but it is able to prevent fire.The new approach involves encapsulating a common flame retardant called triphenyl phosphate in an extremely tiny sheath made of plastic fibers and then inserting several of them into the electrolyte that sits between the anode and cathode. The sheath keeps the retardant from actually coming into contact with the electrolyte material, which is flammable and the source of most battery fires. But the plastic fibers in the sheath have a melting point of 160° Celsius—if that temperature is reached, the plastic melts and the retardant is released into the electrolyte quashing a potential fire. Journal information: Science Advances In test devices using their encapsulated flame retardant, the researchers report that the sheaths melted and the retardant was released and merged with the electrolyte in just 0.4 seconds and because of that fires were averted.In practice, it is presumed that such an occurrence in a device would initiate a hardware error before the battery stopped working to alert a user to what had occurred. Thereafter, a user would also presumably have to purchase a new battery in order to continue using their device which would survive the overheating event. GIF animation showing the EC/DEC electrolyte is highly flammable. Credit: Liu et al. Sci. Adv. 2017;3:e1601978 Schematic illustration for the fabrication of the microfibers by electrospinning. Credit: Liu et al. Sci. Adv. 2017;3:e1601978center_img GIF animation showing the EC/DEC electrolyte is highly flammable. Credit: Liu et al. Sci. Adv. 2017;3:e1601978 Explore further © 2017 Phys.org GIF animation showing the flammability of the EC/DEC electrolytes in the presence of the TPP@PVDF-HFP separator. The flames of the electrolyte diminish rapidly and are completely extinguished within 0.4 seconds. Credit: Liu et al. Sci. Adv. 2017;3:e1601978 (Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Stanford University has found a novel way to introduce flame retardant into a lithium ion battery to prevent fires from occurring. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes their technique and their results when testing it. GIF animation showing the combustion of EC/DEC electrolyte with the flame-retardant TPP. Credit: Liu et al. Sci. Adv. 2017;3:e1601978 Citation: A novel way to put flame retardant in a lithium ion battery (2017, January 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-01-flame-retardant-lithium-ion-battery.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Ensuring insurance for every Indian

first_imgThe insurance industry in India is looking at ways of reinventing itself in a positive light in the economy following fruitful discussions held at the 16th annual insurance conference —In Pursuit of Productivity, Sustainability and Progress—in Mumbai recently. Bouncing cheques, income tax frauds, lack of  penetration into rural and social sectors, are some of the problems bugging this industry in India which is struggling to maintain its equilibrium after opening up to the private sector from the monopoly of the Life Insurance Corporation (LIC) of India in 1999. Also Read – Revolutionising Indian agricultureThe Indian insurance industry is now reeling further with the central government Insurance Bill, which seeks to increase FDI in this sector from the existing 26 pr cent to 49 per cent. Adding to its misery are frauds and overseas figures being an eye-opener, where statistics showed that every hour, 15 fraudulent insurance claims were reported in the UK.HDFC Standard Life Insurance Co. Ltd  MD and CEO Amitabh Chaudhry noted that bouncing cheques and other problems led to insurance companies suffering 40 per cent losses in business every year, besides the insurance business drawing a lot of negative coverage in the past.  Noting that LIC had the monopoly in the past, Insurance Regulatory and Development authority (IRDA),  Insurance Regulatory and Development authority (IRDA) Chairman T S Vijayan said the insurance industry opened up to private players from 1999 but did very little to benefit the rural and social sectors of India, besides the economy of the country. Stating that 3.9 per cent penetration of India was not enough, he said this industry had much potential after viewing the demography chart where 2.5 crore people would be joining the job market within the next 20 years which offered a prospective climate for the insurance sector. Also Read – BLACK FIBREIn the non-life insurance sector, about one million scooters coming out yearly meant an equal number of insurance opportunities, he said while urging for viewing the number of assets being added yearly including hospital treatment. “When India opened up to private insurance players, the industry lost focus of customers and did not address the real needs. While the speed of clearing insurance claims is not bad, the focus should be on which products are bringing the premium for them. They have to be clear on which innovations they are bringing to the market so that the tag of mis-selling and the gap of misunderstanding is removed. The product should be transparent and easily understood. Insurance products should be positioned as a separate brand itself individually.” “We should tell the Prime Minister to bring out a Jan Bima Yojna. Distribution costs of insurance products being very high is a misconception but statistics don’t substantiate this. If a company is mature and strong, then this wont be so. The insurance company can be put on even keel if the top line can go up to match fixed costs. While the policy holders’ money have to be protected, the agent too has to be protected with some remuneration being given on a monthly basis instead of commission, thus ensuring that the company too has done its social responsibility.’Vijayan also criticized the use of paper in the present digital age of the insurance industry. “I joined the Insurance industry in 1977 and even today, people are still using paper. We need to come out of this mindset of paper use where, instead, the ease of selling insurance should happen in a jiffy. In India, things are already in place such as Aadhar card, Internet, mobile etc and the future belongs to this type of solution that is not complex but simple. An integrated solution should be given to customers that includes even after-sale services including settling claims in time. Health re-insurance is also in the picture. All metros should have re-Insurance. Innovation happens when the distribution system gets improved.” Vijayan also noted that mis-selling made money for the insurance persons and remained a fact whether the government understood it or not. Noting that frauds are still happening, he said how far some people could go could be seen from the fact that some crooks even tried selling RBI (Reserve Bank of India) cards – when there are no such cards actually. But “gullible” people still bought them, he said, adding that this had to be tackled by the awareness authority. Highlighting “digitization” in an insurance processing perspective, he said “In Hyderabad, we started a bureau for collecting data on all vehicles insurance and found that 1.5 lakh vehicles were not insured. This data crunch alone can create a reduction in the third party premiums.” ICICI Lombard General Insurance Co Ltd MD and CEO Bhargav Dasgupta said the Insurance industry growth is between Rs 12,000 crore to Rs 17,000 crore at a CAGR of 17 per cent and is expected to grow to Rs 4.80 lakh crore by 2027. Alongside the vast opportunity including new penetration of 0.2 per cent in rural markets, there are 30 crore homes in the country which represent a Rs 30,000 crore opportunity, he said. The industry honchos agreed on the fact that penetration levels needed to be increased  across segments, asset classes and geographies to accelerate growth — alongside the 60 per cent awareness in the health insurance sector — besides SMEs, rural sector and homes offering significant opportunities and yet to be penetrated. In the rural sector, tractors segment penetration was at 30 per cent while being benchmarked at 85 per cent, while in SMEs, employees’ group health is at 10 per cent and benchmarked at 75 per cent. The industry’s performance is driven by interplay of various factors. It would need to take continued action to accelerate growth and further improve profitability.  The union of all the industry captains at one place found that human capital development, technology and utilities are several areas for the insurance industry to collaborate in this regard. Highlighting “human capital” in the Indian insurance industry, New India Assurance Co Ltd CMD G Srinivasan said there is a huge challenge of skills in this industry which needs not just more people alongside its growth, but also the right type of people as “today the Industry is run by people without insurance qualifications.” But if insurance sector is seen as an attractive proposition and career to freshers and youngsters coming out of colleges, was his question. “Earlier, we had to walk a long way to get business.  Even today, we are picking up general graduates and then training them. Also, we do not do enough research & development and hence have to keep trying out talent wherever we can get it. Although insurance is very complex, I can pick up someone from the market and train him in three months time,” he added.“Hospitals don’t realize they are committing a fraud in the system. This can’t go on indefinitely and the situation has reached the extent that the fraud costs are being borne by the customer. The problem of frauds in India is huge as customers do not know they are committing a fraud. When we detect a fraud, we can only reject the claim. So there is need for a legal framework and mechanism to deal with these frauds as there is no way you can discourage them. There is a need for setting up a separate fraud bureau (by looking also abroad into frauds and solutions) to detect and prevent them from happening. The biggest issue online insurance industry is facing is frauds, not underwriting claims,” he said.General Insurance Council Secretary General R Chandrasekaran outlined the need to build the insurance industry’s image as insurance is part of mismanagement. “There is a need to lay down qualifications for candidates entering this industry. Draw up a pyramid of skills needed for the expertise, and draw up an action plan. Where frauds were concerned, one case involving a Schengen Visa had come to us through a travel agent. What we did was to make a portal that worked successfully and led to almost nil travel fraud. Years ago, we never spoke about frauds, but today we are talking openly about it.” ICICI Lombard General Insurance’s Bhargava Dasgupta said that the depth of understanding required to be successful in the insurance industry is higher than in other sectors. “We need to attract talent and find ways of positioning our industry better, besides going to campuses to recruit them. Increasing the attractiveness quotient is the need of the hour,” he said while noting that where technology is concerned, the opportunity is huge. “Mobiles are being used to generate business and ease of operations. Technology is great, but also a huge threat for us if we don’t collaborate well.”Dasgupta also narrated a case where his company discovered a racket operating in the health insurance sector. This was being done in a very randomized manner but still ended up getting exposed, he said while emphasizing “We still need to have an element of collaboration as criminals are getting smarter and the insurance industry cannot catch all frauds. There are even hospitals defrauding the insurance industry.”G Srinivasan intervened to add that “There is a need for collaboration as technology is critical, especially for building up data for the entire country which is needed. Technology is also important to get into the rural markets, besides playing an important role in the industry taking important decisions on such as natural calamities like those that occurred in Kashmir, Andhra Pradesh – especially since India is exposed to natural calamities. There is no scientific model to deal with this and you can see companies failing in this regard.”“Frauds are taking place. I was at a conference in Zimbabwe where the chief of the Insurance Fraud Bureau narrated a case of identity theft where 30 people had their identity stolen. The fraud syndicate responsible for this made just one mistake that was identified by the IFB who tracked them down and brought them to justice. So this is one area needing collaboration in tracking frauds,” he noted.Experian Credit Information Company of India Pvt. Ltd MD Mohan Jayaraman said:  “While India is having the largest bureau in the world and 150 million consumers, the definition and way we view technology is changing today.  There is now availability of technology and infrastructure while redefining and jumping to the next level. We should make use of the small capsules of data that we have, such as the ones we are now doing in the vehicles sector. When we draw the data, we can put it in an easy-to-access portal — that can be also viewed by customers – in a transparent and beneficial way while avoiding frauds also. In the UK, there are fraud repositories today where people can go and identify cases to prevent frauds. But there is a need to bring in a well-paid person to detect such frauds.”Jayaraman said 30 per cent of NPAs in banks had been identified as being frauds and that, in India, large scale private players came together and started sharing information about such frauds, thus saving Rs 468 crore in the process. KGFS head (Unit of IFMR Rural Channels and services Private Limited) Ravi K A said rural households owned movable assets such as tractors and bikes. “Cash flow mismatch is one of the key challenges faced by the rural sector and insurance helps them in this regard,” he said.  Oriental Insurance Co Ltd Director & GM Kuldip Singh said that while there is insurance awareness in the rural areas, their psychology in general insurance was that they felt they were not deriving any benefits of the insurance policy over the insurance period. “Insurance in the health sector is going up as people are getting benefits there. People in rural areas are more  shy and require an insurance distribution channel among them where they can approach even at midnight. Also, there is a rural class which can afford insurance and these need to be approached in cases like Uttaranchal, Jammu and Kashmir, Andhra Pradesh incidents etc.”KEC International and RPG Group (Insurance) General Manager P Chandrasekar highlighted the need to simplify and rejig the insurance process so that indemnification could be done easily. FINO PayTech Ltd Founder Member and Executive Director Rishi Gupta called for greater awareness, higher commissions, training and technology as digitization would address a lot of these challenges. HDFC ERGO General Insurance Co Ltd MD and CEO Ritesh Kumar said rural penetration could be done through schemes involving NGOs and third party distribution channels could service this sector in a better way than any brick-and-mortar office could. However, more insurance products were needed in the rural areas for the small kiosks there, he said.last_img read more

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