Seven injured after bus overturns in Himachal Pradesh

first_imgSeven people were injured after a Himachal Road Transport Corporation (HRTC) bus overturned in Himachal Pradesh’s Mandi district on Sunday, a police spokesperson said. The accident took place near Gokhla village in Kotli tehsil, Mandi Deputy commissioner Rugdev Thakur told PTI. According to the spokesperson, a total of 10 people were in the bus. The seven injured people were rushed to a nearby hospital, he added.last_img

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Finding Fanny director unveils Arjun Kapoor’s new nape tattoo

first_imgPiquing the curiosity of movie-goers for his upcoming movie Finding Fanny , writerdirector Homi Adajania has taken to microblogging website Twitter to provide glimpses of what’s in store.Starting with first looks of the lead roles essayed by Deepika Padukone and Arjun Kapoor, the latest addition to the sneakpeek include a picture of Kapoor’s nape that boasts a cross-shaped tattoo with an outline of wings for his role of Savio, the mechanic.Labelled: ” being tattoolating in Finding Fanny!” (sic), the picture has been shot in the interiors of a battered car.The actor is seen sporting a loose and faded T- shirt with a necklace rope running across his neck, giving insight into the character he is set to be seen as.Meanwhile, Deepika’s famous RK tattoo on the nape of her neck may not make a star appearance in the movie.The film is based on five Goans who set off on a road trip in search of an old postman’s childhood love, but get lost on the way. The Konkani- English satirical story also stars Naseeruddin Shah, Dimple Kapadia and Pankaj Kapur in leading roles.The movie is scheduled for a September release, and its official trailer will be released on July 9.Keeping the countdown ticking, Homi posted a video on why one should watch the trailer with the caption ” Oi twiterratis the reasons to watch # FindingFanny trailer on JULY 9″ ( sic).The 41-second long playful video shows Deepika planting a kiss on Arjun’s cheek as he states, ” And that’s why you should watch the film.”advertisementlast_img read more

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Dominic West Supports Child Cruelty Prevention Campaign

first_imgActor Dominic West, best known for his role as Detective Jimmy McNulty in the HBO drama series ‘The Wire’ and playing Fred West in ‘Appropriate Adult’, is supporting the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children’s Don’t wait until you’re certain campaign.Video: Actor Dominic West supports NSPCC Don’t Wait campaignDominic features in a video message that encourages people to get in touch with the NSPCC if they have concerns about a child.He says in the video: “The longer you deliberate over child abuse, the greater the risk to the child in question. It could be nothing. But it could be something. If you’re worried about a child, don’t wait until you’re certain. Contact the NSPCC on 0808 800 5000.”last_img read more

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NYSE Resumes Trading after 4hour Halt due to Outage

first_imgThe New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) resumed floor trading after more than a three-hour halt on Wednesday due to an undisclosed technical problem, officials said.NYSE halted trading in all securities starting from 11.32 a.m. on Wednesday.NYSE and US officials reported it as a technical issue and not the result of a cyber-attack, Xinhua reported.The Federal Bureau of Investigation said no law enforcement action is needed at NYSE.The White House confirmed that there was no indication of cyber-attacks in the trade suspension of the NYSE.”At this point, there is no indication that malicious actors were involved in these technology issues,” said Josh Earnest, the White House spokesman.The trading halt came in the middle of a selloff in US stocks that was fuelled by concerns over Greece’s uncertainty.However, trading of NYSE securities on other platforms, including NASDAQ, was unaffected. Investors could still buy and sell NYSE-listed stocks at other venues.The NYSE problem came soon after the United Airlines grounded planes at US airports for two hours due to a computer glitch.The website of Wall Street Journal was also temporarily out of use for a while around mid-day for technical difficulties, and was resumed shortly.last_img read more

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SGX brokers struggle to survive as trading volumes fall sharply

first_imgBrokers on Singapore Exchange (SGX) are finding it tough to survive amid falling trading volumes, reflected in the SGX’s drop in revenues and profit for the first quarter, the results of which were declared last week. The inability for traders to recover costs amid low trading activity has even prompted some of them to quit the business altogether.”It is just not worth it. My clients are not interested to trade. Business hasn’t been worse in the past 20 years and I have been through several market crises. Better to call it a day,” an SGX stockbroker told a columnist working for Singapore’s The Straits Times.Another stockbroker rued the S$1-billion threshold that is crucial to recovering costs and making money at the SGX. “Any time when the daily volume falls below $1 billion, I lose money because I can’t cover my fixed costs like rental and salaries for backroom staff. And hitting $1 billion in stock market turnover is now becoming the exception rather than the rule,” he told the columnist.The situation in Singapore is in sharp contrast to Indian stock markets that are witnessing a boom in initial public offerings (IPOs) and listings, in addition to a thriving debt market. Fundraising via IPOs crossed $2.9 billion early this month with more in the pipeline, taking the money raised via public issue to a six-year high.The Singapore Exchange (SGX) posted a 16 percent fall in net profit to S$83 million for the first quarter in FY2017, year-on-year, reflecting lower levels of market activity. The 16-year-old stock exchange had reported a net profit of S$93 million in the corresponding quarter last fiscal.Revenues dropped 13 percent to S$190.8 million from S$219.6 million in the year-ago period, while operating profit came 17 percent lower at S$97.2 million.”Our first quarter performance this year reflects lower levels of market activities, compared with a more volatile market a year earlier,” SGX CEO Loh Boon Chye said in a statement and warned of low trading volumes ahead.”Participants reacting and adjusting to slowing global economic growth, political uncertainties and implications of Brexit on the European economy could result in a period of relatively subdued trading volumes,” he added.last_img read more

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Govt procures paddy but farmers dont benefit

first_imgA dispirited farmer at a rice market in Tentulia, Naogaon. Photo: Prothom AloThe district’s bumper boro crop has dubbed Naogaon as the ‘rice capital’ of the country. As these correspondents proceeded towards Naogaon from the Bogura railway station, the air was filled with the smell of the freshly harvested crops.Rice mills lines both sides of the road. But the young driver of the local vehicle in which we were travelled was least impressed.“There’s no use it staring at all this,” he said. “Normally the entire Naogaon is jubilant during the harvest, but this time it’s in a slumber. When will the price of paddy increase?”With paddy prices at a low, how are the farmers faring? How are the rice mill owners and the traders? Speaking on Wednesday to the relevant government agency, the farmers, and the traders in Naogaon, it was evident that 90 per cent of the farmers were not benefiting from the government drive to procure paddy and rice.Within around 15 minutes of reach Naogaon town, it was evident that it was the import of rice that had hit the farmers’ bumper crop hard.Around 5km down the road from the circuit house, a closed down rice mill caught the eye. In front it, a family was threshing the harvested paddy. The farmer Abdul Jabbar was toiling away with his wife Jamila, son-in-law Delwar, and the grandchildren.They would have to pay a worker a daily wage of 700 taka for job, something Jabbar could hardly afford as he only receives 500 taka for a maund of rice which it took him 700 taka to grow.Jabbar’s wife pulled her husband’s shirt off his back, “Look at the blisters. At this age he is having to cut and carry the crops himself.”Jabbar lamented, “Normally with the new harvest, we invite our son-in-law over and make all sorts of delicious dishes. But this time we have brought them over to thresh the paddy. Eid is almost here but we can’t even imagine buying them new clothes. Managing meagre meals is a struggle.”Further down the road, the hundreds of rice mills were mostly all closed. The boro crop has been harvested and the farmers are going from market to market in a desperate bid to sell their crop, but in vain.The prices are not going above 600 taka a maund. Last year a maund so for 800 to 1000 taka, but this time the rice mill owners and the traders are not buying the paddy.A lone mill among hundreds was open at Hapania in Naogaon sadar. The owner has leased it out to a local rice trader Motahar Hossain. About benefitting from the low prices, Motahar Hossain said, “The prices may be low, but what is the use if it is not sold? I took a 5 million taka loan from the bank and brought paddy during the aman crop, but I still have 70 per cent of that grain unsold. How will I buy the boro crop? In the mean time I have to pay interest on the loan.”Why is the paddy not being sold? At the Tetulia marketplace, around 15 km further, rice trader Hasan Ali was buying paddy from the farmers at 600 to 620 taka per maund for the medium grade jirashail rice and 500 taka per maund of coarse grained rice. He said last year this paddy sold at 800 to 900 taka.He was confronted with the question of profit. He will sell the rice to the government godowns at a high price, so he must be have a good profit margin.This statement agitated him and the other trader standing by his side. “The government won’t buy more than one tonne from one person,” he said, “and do you know how much we have to pay just to get on the government procurement list?”It was clear that corruption and irregularities was involved in the food department’s food grain procurement drive.In the meantime, it had been week since GM Faruk Hossain Patwary had been transferred from Tangail to Naogaon as food controller. He was sitting in his office with the upazila food controllers. Also there was an officer of a state intelligence agency. Food department persons were briefing the district food controller about the rice procurement drive.The district food controller said that this year there was an allocation to procure 72,096 tonnes of rice from the district. So far 5,632 tonnes has been procured and they had signed agreements with 1029 rice mills. They would also procure 5,586 tonnes of paddy. As per government rules, they were to procure 3 tonnes from each farmer, but in order to procure from more farmers, they would be buying one tonne per farmer this time.In order to verify the food controller’s statement, a visit to the government food grain warehouses was made. Paddy was being brought in small vans and other local vehicles by the farmers to be stocked in one of the warehouses.One of the farmers was drying out his paddy under the sun in front of the warehouse. The warehouse people explained that the paddy was still damp and would rot if stored in that condition yet the farmer couldn’t afford to transport the grain back. That was why he was drying it out, in order to sell as much as he could salvage.Another farmer there, Ainul Huq, said he had grown 230 tonnes of rice in his fields yet the government was only buying one tonne from him at the rate of 1,040 taka. He was having to sell the remaining grain for just 400 to 500 taka per maund. He said the government procurement made no difference to them at all.Food minister Sadhan Chandra Das told Prothom Alo, “We want to buy more paddy directly from the farmers, but in accordance to the decision of the national committee for food procurement, 150,000 tonnes will be purchased. I cannot overturn the decision on my own. But we will cancel our agreements with the rice mills which cannot provide the specific volume of rice. We will ask them buy that amount of paddy directly from the farmers. We are constructing warehouses around the country to store 1 million tonnes of rice.”General secretary of the rice mill owners group in Naogaon, Farhad Hossain Chakdar, blamed rice import on the falling paddy prices.He was annoyed that they couldn’t avail bank loans to procure paddy, yet the importers were being given loans easily.He said, “We will have to leave the rice trade and turn to selling fruit instead. How will the government feed the people three square meals a day if they put the famers and the rice mill owners into this predicament?”*The report, appeared in Prothom Alo print edition, has been rewritten in English by Ayesha Kabirlast_img read more

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As Deep Freeze Sets In People Urged To Help Most Vulnerable

first_imgPhoto via Twitter @MultCoBridgesFreezing temperatures and below-zero wind chills socked much of the northern United States on Wednesday, and the snow-hardened city of Erie, dug out from a record snowfall.The post-Christmas prolonged, dangerously cold weather across half the country has advocates for the homeless scrambling to get people off the streets and local officials urging residents to assist their elderly neighbors.Residents from the Midwest to the Northeast were dealing with sub-freezing temperatures and wind chills, while those in the Pacific Northwest and northern Rockies were bracing for storms that forecasters warn can cause heavy mountain snow and freezing rain.The cold is expected to continue through the holiday weekend and likely longer, according to the National Weather Service, prolonging a stretch of brutal weather blamed for vehicle crashes, emergency room visits and at least one death.Wind chill advisories remained in place for many areas. Animal owners were urged to bring their pets indoors if possible or at least make sure they have sufficient warmth.Forecasters warned people to be wary of hypothermia and frostbite from the arctic blast that has gripped a large swath from the Midwest to the Northeast, where the temperature, without the wind chill factored in, dipped to minus 32 (minus 35 Celsius) Thursday morning in Watertown, New York. Temperatures rose to minus 7 (minus 22 Celsius) early Friday morning.Heavy snow is expected Friday in the Pacific Northwest, across the Cascade mountains and into the northern Rockies before gradually tapering off Saturday. As much as 2 to 3 feet of snow is possible in the highest terrain, while coastal regions were expected to see heavy rainfall.About 30 crashes were reported on icy roadways Friday morning in Michigan, where below-freezing temperatures continue to envelop parts of the state.A woman trying to maneuver her wheelchair on a cold, snowy night in Nebraska got a firetruck escort. Snow and construction items on the sidewalk forced her into a busy Omaha thoroughfare Tuesday. Firefighters returning to their station noticed her. They flipped on their lights and followed the woman until she reached her destination. She gave them a thumbs-up as they departed.In South Dakota, an 83-year-old woman died from exposure to the cold. Police believe she crashed her car on a gravel road near the tiny rural town of Revillo then left the vehicle to look for help. They found her body in a ditch on Sunday.Warming centers have been set up in some locations, including recreation centers across Cincinnati. Boston’s Pine Street Inn sent a van with outreach workers around to persuade people to spend the night inside, but some said they prefer the streets.Segundo Rivera and Sean Stuart told the Boston Herald they were not comfortable spending the night in a shelter.“We’ve lived out here so long it’s like honestly, this is comfortable for us,” Rivera said.A shelter spokeswoman said that if people don’t want to go to a shelter, they’re given blankets, warm clothing and a hot beverage, and informed of the dangers of extreme cold.The Ohio Department of Aging said older people are at increased risk from such severe cold, from medication side effects to falling risks. The department encouraged people to check on family members, friends and neighbors to make sure they’re warm enough and have their needed medications and sufficient food and water.On Thursday, cold weather records were set from Arkansas to Maine, and the freezing air will linger through the weekend, reaching as far south as Texas and the Florida Panhandle.In New Hampshire, the cold set a record for the day of minus 34 (minus 37 Celsius) atop the Northeast’s highest peak, Mount Washington.In the Midwest, temperatures in Minneapolis aren’t expected to top zero (minus 18 Celsius) this weekend, and it likely will be in the teens (minus 11 Celsius to minus 7 Celsius) when the ball drops on New Year’s Eve in New York City.A winter storm warning was in effect for much of Montana, calling for significant snowfall followed by dangerously cold temperatures as 2017 comes to an end.“People like to think of themselves as being prepared for the weather and things like that,” Billings forecaster Dan Borsum said, “but this one will get your attention.” Sharelast_img read more

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Jupiter has lost one of its cloud stripes

first_img Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — New photographs of the gas giant Jupiter, the first taken on May 9, show the massive reddish band of clouds known as the Southern Equatorial Belt in the planet’s southern hemisphere has disappeared from view. The South Equatorial Belt (SEB) has faded away leaving just the north belt (NEB) viewable in small telescopes. Image credit: Anthony Wesley This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Jupiter has lost one of its cloud stripes (2010, May 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-05-jupiter-lost-cloud-stripes.html © 2010 PhysOrg.com Aus amateur tells of ‘one in a million’ Jupiter spot The first photographs were taken by a noted Australian amateur astronomer, Anthony Wesley from Murrumbateman in New South Wales, using a 14.5 inch telescope. Wesley said he had been eagerly waiting to take photographs after Jupiter disappeared behind the sun and out of view for three months. In mid 2009 it was clear to Jupiter watchers the cloud band, which encircles the planet, was beginning to enter a new fading cycle. Wesley, an enthusiastic Jupiter observer, said the exact time the cloud belt will revive is unknown, but it fades every three to 15 years. Previous fading cycles have been characterized by violent and dramatic storms in the southern equatorial latitudes. The Northern and Southern Equatorial belts are composed of ammonia ice with phosphorus and some sulfur.It is not known why the belt periodically disappears, but it may be that it sinks lower if it cools, and then the view of it is obscured by clouds pouring in over the top of it. The clouds on Jupiter are tens of thousands of kilometers deep. Wesley said the phenomenon could be linked to storm activity that preceded the change.Wesley said Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system, is fascinating to observe and photograph because the internal heat deep within the atmosphere makes it so dynamic and dramatic, and it can look different even from one day to the next. Watch Jupiter rotate and its cloud belts move with the winds. The time-lapse video was made using images shot during Voyager 1’s flyby of the planet in 1979. The most dramatic feature on Jupiter is the Great Red Spot, which now stands out more than usual since it is on the edge of the Southern Equatorial Belt, which has now faded from view. The Great Red Spot is a huge storm twice the size of Earth that has raged for at least three centuries, although astronomers said last year it appears to be shrinking. The photographs taken by Wesley have been released by The Planetary Society in California, and are also available on Wesley’s own website. In July last year Wesley was first to notice a dark blemish on Jupiter, probably caused by a comet. It is possible to see the features of Jupiter even with quite a modest telescope.last_img read more

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Sediment study of African lake may help explain huge number of related

first_img © 2015 Phys.org Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Drilling site in nearly 2000’ of water on Lake Malawi. Drill cores at this location penetrated more than 1250’ below the bottom of the lake. Credit: Jason Agnich, University of Minnesota Duluth. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several universities in the U.S. has conducted a drilling study of Lake Malawi in South-East Africa and suggest their findings may help explain the large number of cichlid species that call the lake their home. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes their drilling expedition, what the sediment samples showed and why they believe their findings may help explain the unusual number of related fish species.center_img Study shows evolution does not always mean more diversification Citation: Sediment study of African lake may help explain huge number of related fish species (2015, December 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-12-sediment-african-lake-huge-fish.html More information: Continuous 1.3-million-year record of East African hydroclimate, and implications for patterns of evolution and biodiversity, Robert P. Lyons, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1512864112AbstractThe transport of moisture in the tropics is a critical process for the global energy budget and on geologic timescales, has markedly influenced continental landscapes, migratory pathways, and biological evolution. Here we present a continuous, first-of-its-kind 1.3-My record of continental hydroclimate and lake-level variability derived from drill core data from Lake Malawi, East Africa (9–15° S). Over the Quaternary, we observe dramatic shifts in effective moisture, resulting in large-scale changes in one of the world’s largest lakes and most diverse freshwater ecosystems. Results show evidence for 24 lake level drops of more than 200 m during the Late Quaternary, including 15 lowstands when water levels were more than 400 m lower than modern. A dramatic shift is observed at the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT), consistent with far-field climate forcing, which separates vastly different hydroclimate regimes before and after ∼800,000 years ago. Before 800 ka, lake levels were lower, indicating a climate drier than today, and water levels changed frequently. Following the MPT high-amplitude lake level variations dominate the record. From 800 to 100 ka, a deep, often overfilled lake occupied the basin, indicating a wetter climate, but these highstands were interrupted by prolonged intervals of extreme drought. Periods of high lake level are observed during times of high eccentricity. The extreme hydroclimate variability exerted a profound influence on the Lake Malawi endemic cichlid fish species flock; the geographically extensive habitat reconfiguration provided novel ecological opportunities, enabling new populations to differentiate rapidly to distinct species. Scientists have debated amongst themselves the possible reasons for such a large number of cichlid species in one lake—over a 1000, which is more than any other lake. Possible ideas have included unknown environmental factors or biological tendencies of the cichlid in general. In this new effort, the researchers suggest it might have been because lake levels changed so dramatically over the years.To learn more, the researchers traveled to the lake and conducted drilling operations, collecting sediment samples that revealed lake level changes over the past 1.3 million years. In looking at the data, the team found that that there were approximately 24 dry periods where the lake level dropped at least 650 feet and multiple periods where excessive moisture caused the lake to overflow into the surrounding area. There was also a big change that occurred approximately 800,000 years ago where the climate shifted from one that was mostly dry, to one that was much wetter. They noted that during some of the low level periods the lake likely broke into several pieces.The researchers suggest that such dramatic fluctuations in lake levels could account for the huge number of cichlid species, a dominant fish that would have had to be able to change quickly to adapt to new conditions—lower lake levels, for example, would have meant the water would have been a lot saltier with dramatically different pH levels, and if the lake broke up for long periods of time it would have led to isolation of some species.If the theory by the team is correct, it still does not explain, as they acknowledge, how it was that so many of the species that developed managed to survive till today. That answer will likely take a genetic study.last_img read more

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