TFA Seeking Event Volunteers

first_imgWith an exciting two year calendar of events approaching including the 2015 FIT Touch World Cup (2015 TWC), TFA is undertaking an initial internal expression of interest process seeking suitable Volunteer Event Staff personnel to contribute to the success of our events. If interesting in volunteering in any of the events, please complete the online Expression of Interest process via http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/Volunteer-Event-Staff-EOI by Wednesday, 22 January 2013.Further details are available in the attachment.Related Filesvolunteer_event_staff_-_expression_of_interest-pdfRelated LinksVolunteers Requiredlast_img read more

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A Michigan Fan Got A Tattoo Of Jim Harbaugh On Saved By The Bell

first_imgJim Harbaugh speaks as he is introduced as the new Head Coach of the University of Michigan football team.ANN ARBOR, MI – DECEMBER 30: Jim Harbaugh speaks as he is introduced as the new Head Coach of the University of Michigan football team at the Junge Family Champions Center on December 30, 2014 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)Michigan fans are still pretty pumped about the hiring of former Wolverines quarterback Jim Harbaugh as head coach. One has chosen a rather interesting way to convey that excitement. A Twitter user who goes by the name of Mark the Nomad has gotten a tattoo that pays homage to Harbaugh’s 1994 appearance on the television show Saved By The Bell. No, really.Mark claims that he’s received the most negative feedback from Columbus, Ohio. That doesn’t surprise anyone.I have a very important announcement to make.— Mark (@MarktheNomad) April 4, 2015I want all of you to stop what you’re doing and look.— Mark (@MarktheNomad) April 4, 2015So, this just happened: #GoBlue pic.twitter.com/jqlqyDoFsM— Mark (@MarktheNomad) April 4, 2015A huge thanks to those who donated to the tattoo fund on GoFundMe. I certainly didn’t think it’d pick up traction the way it did.— Mark (@MarktheNomad) April 4, 2015I had the best tattoo artist, IMHO, on the planet. If you’re in the Sarasota area, hell if you’re in Florida, go see Caitlin at Trap Ink.— Mark (@MarktheNomad) April 4, 2015You may be shocked to learn that most of the negative feedback I’ve received is via Columbus, Ohio.— Mark (@MarktheNomad) April 4, 2015If we’re being honest, it’s actually some high-quality ink. That being said, he’s probably going to get tired of explaining it to everyone he ever meets.last_img read more

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Womens Basketball No 14 Ohio State hopes to finish home season strong

Ohio State redshirt senior forward Stephanie Mavunga takes a shot during the Buckeyes game against the Boilermakers on Feb 18. Credit: Colin Hass-Hill | Sports EditorTied for first place with No. 13 Maryland atop the Big Ten standings, No. 14 Ohio State (22-6, 11-3 Big Ten) will play its final home game of the season against Northwestern (10-18, 3-11 Big Ten) at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Schottenstein Center. The Buckeyes have had recent success against the Wildcats. They hold a three-game winning streak against Northwestern, and have won seven of their eight previous matchups. Wednesday’s matchup will be the lone time the teams play this season, and the first meeting since Ohio State’s 31-point victory in the quarterfinals of last season’s conference tournament.Northwestern began its season winning five of its first six games, but since has gone 5-17 with only three conference victories. The team hit a rough stretch in January and February with it going on an eight-game losing streak, and at one point losing 10 of 11 games.Ohio State’s focus will shift to freshman guard Lindsey Pulliam, who leads Northwestern in scoring with 14.3 points per game. But as a team, Northwestern struggles to score and sits third to last in the Big Ten with 62.4 points per game. Ohio State, by comparison, averages 85 points per game.That doesn’t mean Ohio State head coach Kevin McGuff is overlooking the Wildcats.“If you look at them, they’ve played their best games against the best teams on the road,” McGuff said. “They have a lot of talent, they’re just young, they have a hard time closing games, but they are in every game and I suspect this time a year they’re gonna take their best shot they can on the road knowing what we have in front of us.”The Wildcats have three players who score more than 10 points, with the next closest — freshman Jordan Hamilton — coming in at just 7.8 points per game. Abi Scheid, a 6-foot-2 sophomore forward, is second on the team in scoring, with 12.4 per game while junior forward Pallas Kunaiyi-Akpanah averages a double-double, with 11 points and 11.5 rebounds per game. With two games remaining, Ohio State will need help from other teams in order to secure the top seed in the Big Ten Tournament. Maryland, with its 11-3 conference record, holds the first place tiebreaker as a result of the Terrapins’ 99-69 victory against Ohio State earlier this season. In the season’s final stretch, the Buckeyes also will have a shot at securing home games for the first two rounds of the NCAA tournament. They must beat Northwestern in order to remain one of the top-16 teams. Senior guard Asia Doss is not concerned with hosting tournament games, though.“Honestly, I think it’s just one game at a time, at this point we still have a chance to win the Big Ten Conference,” senior guard Asia Doss said. “We’re still trying to finish out the season, at least for me that hasn’t really crossed my mind. I don’t really look at that, I’m just worried about the Big Ten right now.”Ohio State senior guard Kelsey Mitchell has a chance to take advantage of Northwestern, which has the third-worst scoring margin in the conference. She is tied for second in the nation with 24.6 points per game and needs 42 points to pass former Baylor forward Brittney Griner for the third-most career points. Mitchell has scored career 3,242 points. read more

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Chain letters reveal surprising circulation patterns

first_img Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The chain e-mail originated sometime in 2002, and claimed to be a petition to organize opposition to the impending US-Iraq war. Tens of thousands of people signed their names to several hundred copies of the petition, with some copies appearing on Web archives. Like most Internet chain letters, the petition had its origins in a hoax, but its widespread dissemination is one of the few instances of a single piece of traceable information spreading on a global scale.“Given the many ways in which information, news, and new ideas are constantly spreading through our social networks, it’s surprising how difficult it is to collect data on the ways in which this spreading happens,” researchers David Liben-Nowell and Jon Kleinberg told PhysOrg.com. “Data from chain-letter petitions lets us look at processes that are otherwise essentially invisible, and begin to formulate theories for the patterns we observe.”Liben-Nowell and Kleinberg are computer scientists from Carleton College and Cornell University, respectively. The duo used online search engines to collect copies of the signed petitions that were posted on numerous Web sites. When they analyzed the 20,000 names on the 637 lists they found, and removed various “mutations,” they discovered some surprising patterns. Contrary to predictions that large-scale information spreads exponentially, like an explosive epidemic, the researchers found that the letter did not reach a large number of individuals in a few steps. Rather, it took hundreds of steps of people forwarding the e-mail on to reach the 20,000 who signed the found copies. As the researchers explain, this pattern suggests that the mechanics of a single piece of information spreading on a global scale is more complex than originally thought. Some of their results, which appear in a recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveal that people who forwarded the letter generally forwarded it to large numbers of other individuals. By contrast, most senders (94%) produced just one “daughter” that signed the letter. In other words, it seemed that most people ignored the e-mail. Citation: Chain letters reveal surprising circulation patterns (2008, April 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-04-chain-letters-reveal-circulation-patterns.html A chain letter hoax that fooled thousands of people may help computer scientists understand how information spreads on a global scale. The final result was a “tree” of nodes and connections that was long and thin, not one that funneled out as in the case of rapidly spreading information. Gossip in smaller communities may fan out quickly, but – as the new study shows – such a pattern changes with scale. This large-scale spreading of information is a rare case, since most circulated e-mail messages never reach such a large number of recipients.“A natural assumption going into this study was that information would spread explosively, reaching many people in only a few steps,” said Liben-Nowell and Kleinberg. “Instead, a much more complex picture emerges, with the chain letter following longer, narrower paths. After this initial surprise, we eventually found possible ways to reconcile the deep, narrow structures we observed with the facts we knew about human social networks.”A couple things that might explain the pattern include individuals “forwarding” the petition to the same group of e-mail addresses copied on the e-mail they received (“replying to all”). Individuals who received the petition more than once typically only signed one of them, leaving others as dead ends. Also, individuals in the same network might have tried to all sign the same petition, and keep forwarding it to each other rather then adding their names to different lists – which produces the observed “single daughter” characteristic.Understanding how a single piece of information spreads on a large scale may have applications in a variety of areas, such as word-of-mouth marketing and investigating the spreading of technological innovations, news, and opinions. Contrary to spreading explosively, information traveling on large scales seems to be quite fragile, with many opportunities for getting lost. The pattern might hold true for different kinds of information spreading, as well.“We expect this kind of pattern would show up in certain other settings, but it’s an open question how general it is,” the researchers said. “For example, the other large-scale chain-letter for which we have data – a petition to support funding of National Public Radio – exhibits a spreading pattern that looks very similar. It’s natural to believe that jokes and news clippings on the Internet may well spread in similar ways, though there certainly could be differences in spreading patterns between information that is politically charged and information that is free of controversy.“Once we look more generally – say, at the spread of new technologies or new products by word-of-mouth, or the rise in name recognition of new celebrities or new political figures – it’s a fascinating open question to consider how diverse the different spreading patterns might be. But we expect that in all these cases, the spreading will likely have a structure that is more complex than simple models have suggested.” More information: Liben-Nowell, David, and Kleinberg, Jon. “Tracing information flow on a global scale using Internet chain-letter data.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, March 25, 2008, vol. 105, no. 12. 4633-4638.Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Medical researchers seek eradication of peste des petits ruminants diseaselast_img read more

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Sky in Germany has signed a new deal with satellit

first_imgSky in Germany has signed a new deal with satellite operator SES, leasing more capacity on Astra at 19.2 degrees East for Ultra High Definition (UHD) broadcasts.Sky Deutschland’s chief officer of legal, regulatory affairs and distribution, Holger Ensslin, said that Sky has been investing in HD as part of its commitment to innovation.“The agreement with SES gives us planning security in terms of capacity so that we can continue to develop Ultra HD and get it ready for the market,” he claimed.Although Sky Deutschland has not formally announced plans for a dedicated UHD channel, its head of innovation and strategy, Stephan Heimbecher, said at a conference in London earlier this year that it could launch a 4K TV service in Germany at the end of this year or the beginning of next.Sky in Germany has run several Ultra HD tests since 2012. A spokesperson for the company told DTVE that it will continue to do so with a goal of “moving forward step-by-step to bring Ultra HD to the consumers.”So far, Sky’s UHD trials have focused around live productions around sports and concerts – including this year’s Champions League final. A Sky spokesperson said these types of broadcast offer the “biggest value for the viewers.”last_img read more

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Novel biosensor can isolate and target leukemic stem cells

first_img Source:https://www.aftau.org/page.aspx?pid=974&storyid4704=2442&ncs4704=3 Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 12 2019All stem cells can multiply, proliferate and differentiate. Because of these qualities, leukemic stem cells are the most malignant of all leukemic cells. Understanding how leukemic stem cells are regulated has become an important area of cancer research.A team of Tel Aviv University researchers have now devised a novel biosensor that can isolate and target leukemic stem cells. The research team, led by Dr. Michael Milyavsky of the Department of Pathology at TAU’s Sackler School of Medicine, discuss their unique genetically encoded sensor and its ability to identify, isolate and characterize leukemic stem cells in a study published on January 31 in Leukemia.”The major reason for the dismal survival rate in blood cancers is the inherent resistance of leukemic stem cells to therapy,” Dr. Milyavsky says. “But only a minor fraction of leukemic cells have high regenerative potential, and it is this regeneration that results in disease relapse. A lack of tools to specifically isolate leukemic stem cells has precluded the comprehensive study and specific targeting of these stem cells until now.”Related StoriesSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyNew shingles vaccine reduces outbreaks of painful rash among stem cell transplant patientsTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerUntil recently, cancer researchers used markers on the surface of the cell to distinguish leukemic stem cells from the bulk of cancer cells, with only limited success. “There are hidden cancer stem cells that express differentiated surface markers despite their stem cell function. This permits those cells to escape targeted therapies,” Dr. Milyavsky explains. “By labeling leukemia cells on the basis of their stem character alone, our sensor manages to overcome surface marker-based issues.”We believe that our biosensor can provide a prototype for precision oncology efforts to target patient-specific leukemic stem cells to fight this deadly disease.”The scientists searched genomic databases for “enhancers,” the specific regulatory regions of the genome that are particularly active in stem cells. Then they harnessed genome engineering to develop a sensor composed of a stem cell active enhancer fused with a fluorescence gene that labels the cells in which the enhancer is active.The scientists were also able to demonstrate that sensor-positive leukemia stem cells are sensitive to a known and inexpensive cancer drug called 4-HPR (fenretinide), providing a novel biomarker for patients who can potentially benefit from this drug.”Using this sensor, we can perform personalized medicine oriented to drug screens by barcoding a patient’s own leukemia cells to find the best combination of drugs that will be able to target both leukemia in bulk as well as leukemia stem cells inside it,” Dr. Milyavsky concludes. “We’re also interested in developing killer genes that will eradicate specific leukemia stem cells in which our sensor is active.”The researchers are now investigating those genes that are active in leukemic stem cells in the hope finding druggable targets.last_img read more

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Minimally invasive treatment fixes hole in the heart

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 7 2019Texas Tech Physicians of El Paso now performs a safe and minimally invasive treatment for a heart birth defect that affects up to 25% of people.The procedure that closes the defect known as an atrial septal defect, or ASD; and a smaller defect which causes stroke, called patent foramen ovale, or PFO takes a much different route than the past use of open-heart surgery. Doctors open a vein/vessel near the groin and insert a long, thin tube called a catheter. The catheter, loaded with an alloy device called an Amplatzer septal occluder, is guided into the interior of the heart. Once in place, the occluder is released, and it expands into a circular coil that closes the hole.About 15 years ago, almost 90% of these type of congenital heart defects were repaired through open-heart surgery, said TTP El Paso interventional cardiologist Harsha Nagarajarao, M.D., who serves as co-director of the Cardiovascular Catheterization Laboratory at University Medical Center of El Paso. Today, the transcatheter coil occlusion procedure is widely used across the world to treat heart holes.Related StoriesImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsResearch opens possibility of developing single-dose gene therapy for inherited arrhythmiasTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockDr. Nagarajarao and other TTP El Paso interventional cardiologists perform the procedure at UMC. TTP El Paso is the clinical practice of Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso.Dr. Nagarajarao said up to 25% of people are born with this kind of hole in the heart. Not all of them will require surgery, but those that present with stroke will need to have the hole closed, he said.Dr. Nagarajarao, who also serves as an assistant professor in the division of cardiology at TTUHSC El Paso, adds that there is a large, unmet need in the area for treating this type of heart defect. To help increase the numbers of physicians capable of treating the defect, Dr. Nagarajarao is helping train TTP El Paso physicians for certification in the procedure.Earlier this year, a 36-year-old man who suffered multiple strokes over two years with no indication of a cause was referred by TTP El Paso’s neurology department to Dr. Nagarajarao’s cardiology team. The doctors determined he had a PFO which was responsible for his stroke and scheduled him for the coil occlusion procedure.The surgery, performed by Dr. Nagarajarao, was a success and significantly reduced the risk of stroke for the patient. The surgery took about two hours and required only light anesthesia.Source: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Pasolast_img read more

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Autonomous trucks for logistics centers

first_img Tired and exhausted from the long route, the truck driver arrives at the depot. However, instead of driving the vehicle to the loading ramp, waiting there until it is fully loaded and then parking the truck in the parking lot, the driver can enjoy his well-deserved after-work hours earlier: he already leaves at the gate to the depot – the truck does everything else by itself. In other words: it drives independently to the loading ramp, waits until it is loaded and then parks in the parking lot.Autonomous vehicles in automation zonesScientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Transportation and Infrastructure Systems IVI are making this possible in cooperation with various industrial partners in the AutoTruck project. The researchers have deliberately set their sights on automation zones, such as mines, truck depots, ports and company premises. In contrast to autonomous driving on the road, self-driving vehicles in such demarcated areas can be more effectively controlled: the people who circulate there can be instructed in advance, and access is not permitted to unauthorized individuals. In addition, the autonomous vehicles do not need any road registration there, but rather only machine approval. At a maximum of 15 to 20 kilometers per hour, the speeds are significantly lower than in road traffic. “Compared to road traffic, specially equipped automation zones have a decisive advantage: autonomous vehicles ready for registration will be able to be used there in the near future,” says Dr. Sebastian Wagner, Group Manager at the Fraunhofer IVI. “It’s true that controlled conditions prevail in these spatially delimited areas. Nevertheless, key challenges have to be solved here, as well, that are relevant and transferable for public road traffic.” Spatially demarcated areas such as company premises are ideal test areas for autonomous driving: the vehicles do not require road registration, traffic is manageable, other people who use the road are informed and unauthorized individuals are not allowed access. In the collaborative project AutoTruck, Fraunhofer is cooperating with industry to develop technologies for autonomous trucks in logistics centers. The results also inform the research on self-driving vehicles for normal road traffic. Citation: Autonomous trucks for logistics centers (2018, July 2) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-autonomous-trucks-logistics-centers.html Explore further Provided by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft Of course, this is not the only motivation: the autonomously driving vehicles provide numerous advantages for the operators of depots and the like. On the one hand, they can counteract the demographic change, since it is becoming increasingly difficult to recruit truck drivers. In addition, the autonomous vehicles would be able to operate day and night, making fewer mistakes along with lowering the number of accidents as well as the costs. The technologies developed in the AutoTruck project will be demonstrated and further developed at the depot of the project partner Emons Spedition GmbH. Centerpiece: Online control centerAt the heart of the Fraunhofer development is an online control center, more precisely the HelyOS system, short for “highly efficient online yard operating system”. This can be operated via standard Internet browsers worldwide. Therefore, instead of having to employ one driver in each truck, a single operator can, for example, control 30 vehicles in Munich or even 50 in Dresden. The vehicles are displayed on a digital map on the Internet – if desired, the operator can also superimpose maps from a survey office. In the control room, he can not only see where the individual vehicles are located, but also monitor them and retrieve status information, such as battery level, loading condition, etc. And: He can send missions and work orders to the vehicles, such as by clicking on a target position on the map. With such a click, the control center starts the live maneuver planning TruckTrix, which was also developed by the Fraunhofer IVI. TruckTrix calculates the complete path along which the truck is to travel. The system not only takes into account the geometry of the vehicle, but also fixed obstacles as well as the routes of other autonomous vehicles. In order to be able to take the fixed obstacles into consideration, the researchers have extended the maps with the corresponding information as well as with information concerning where driveable areas are located. TruckTrix is available as an online service via an interface for users and customers.The calculated routes are sent to the trucks in which Fraunhofer IVI researchers have integrated standard electrical controls. Control algorithms, also from the Fraunhofer IVI, control the drive and the steering in such a way that the target and actual positions always coincide. The tracking system of the lead partner Götting KG continuously determines where the truck is located in the automation zone.In the spring of 2018, a truck that had been converted for electric drive by the partners was handed over to the Fraunhofer IVI. The electric motor is powered by 305 kilowatts of continuous power from lithium-iron-phosphate batteries. Within the next months, the Fraunhofer IVI researchers plan to install further components, such as sensors, actuators and control devices, for autonomous driving. In a little more than a year, the vehicle will make its first independent trip. “Many of the developed technologies can be transferred to public road traffic in the medium to long term,” says Wagner, “such as the control algorithms, obstacle detection, the locating solution or the communication between truck and infrastructure.” Handover of an autonomous truck. Credit: Fraunhofer IVI Autonomous driving – hands on the wheel or no wheel at all The truck drives independently to the loading ramp and waits until it is loaded. Credit: Fraunhofer IVI This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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From European dream to global giant Airbus marks half century

first_img Explore further “We employ 130,000 highly-skilled people globally and are a powerful engine of productivity, exports and innovation for Europe.”The firm delivered its last thousand planes in just 30 months. But in the early days, it took nearly twenty years to produce a thousand aircraft.It faced criticism for developments like fly-by-wire controls, which improve handling, and flight envelope protection, which stop the plane performing manoeuvres outside its performance limits. Apart from technological advances, cracking America was a key ingredient in creating the global giant. The A300 made a strong impression on Frank Borman, the former Apollo astronaut who headed Eastern Air Lines and championed the idea of buying more economical planes. Airbus’s backbone, the A320 In 1984, Airbus launched the A320, a single-aisle, medium-haul aircraft to challenge Boeing, which until then had dominated the largest segment in the civil aviation market. Airbus profits plunge, blames scrapping of A380 Originally the Bombardier C Series, the rebranded A220-300 helped Airbus fill demand for a slightly smaller medium-range aircraft with the latest in fuel efficient design The aircraft paved the way for the more fuel efficient A320neo which has become the backbone of the company, strengthening its hold on the key market segment after Boeing’s 737 MAX planes were grounded after two deadly crashes in March and October. The Airbus A320neo – the revamped and more fuel efficient version of Airbus’s most popular single aisle passenger jet – has driven sales in recent years The company in April reported a slump in first quarter net profits which fell 86 percent from the same period in 2018 at 40 million euros ($45 million).Airbus is also under investigation in France, Britain and the United States after disclosing transaction irregularities in 2016, while US President Donald Trump has threatened the European Union with new tariffs if it does not end subsidies to Airbus.But analysts see Airbus as having an opportunity to profit from the booming airline market, particularly in Asia, and from the global grounding of Boeing’s 737 MAX series plane after two recent deadly crashes involving the popular new airliner.Airbus’s boss Guillaume Faury said the firm aims to continue being a leader in aviation innovation. “The aerospace industry stands on the cusp of a technological revolution to match anything in its history”, he said.”European aerospace should aspire to lead this coming revolution in innovation and the transition to a more sustainable aviation sector.” Despite a failed deal with British defence firm BAE Systems in 2012, Airbus’ partnership with Canadian Bombadier’s C Series programme in 2018 enhanced its position as a global force.France and Germany still hold 11 percent stakes in Airbus through holding companies with a smaller 4 percent stake held by the Spanish government. The rest of the shares are traded on the stock exchange.But production hasn’t always run smoothly. The firm announced in January it would scrap production of its A380 passenger giant by 2021 due to lack of orders. The double decker jet earned plaudits from passengers but failed to win over enough airlines to justify its massive costs.Key clients have also hit trouble as some airlines hit financial difficulty with Europe’s third biggest low-cost airline Norwegian saying it was further delaying deliveries of Airbus and Boeing 737 MAX planes it had ordered. Airbus’ defence division is the biggest shareholder in the consortium that makes the Eurofighter Typhoon fighter jet The double-decker Airbus A380-800 has been lauded by passengers, but it can be costly to operate for airlines, which failed to order enough of them for Airbus to continue manufacturing the aircraft Fifty years ago at the Paris air show, France’s transport minister and Germany’s economy minister signed an agreement that would change aviation history. Citation: From European dream to global giant: Airbus marks half century (2019, May 29) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-european-global-giant-airbus-century.html © 2019 AFP The year was 1969 and Europe needed a smaller, lighter and more cost-effective passenger aircraft than American rivals. Five years later, the A300B2 was born, a short-to-medium range plane with two engines, despite safety concerns in an era when three engines was the standard minimum.Fast-forward to 2019, Airbus is celebrated as a success of European cooperation, one of two kings of global civil aviation along with Boeing. Around the world, an Airbus takes off or lands every two seconds.It now produces passenger planes ranging in size up to the A380 jumbo jet, helicopters, fighter jets and is even involved in space exploration.Its story has been marked by setbacks, political turbulence and production problems but Airbus management believes it can confidently look forward to the next half century. “Airbus produces half of the world’s large commercial aircraft and has thriving helicopter, defence and space businesses,” said CEO Guillaume Faury, who in April replaced Tom Enders who served five years at the helm. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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