EPL: Wounded Reds feast on Bournemouth

first_imgRelatedPosts Suarez agrees Atletico terms Mane double eases Liverpool to win over 10-man Chelsea EPL: Chelsea, Liverpool in cagey duel Liverpool vs. Bournemouth Venue: Anfield Stadium Kick off: 1:30PMLiverpool will be looking to return to winning ways after an uncharacteristically poor spell of form when they welcome relegation-threatened Bournemouth to Anfield at lunchtime. Jurgen Klopp’s side have lost three of their last four games across all competitions but are firm favourites to get their campaign back on track against a Bournemouth side who sit inside the bottom three with 10 games of the season remaining. After a season of winning week after week and breaking records left, right and centre, Liverpool have finally suffered a slump in form since returning from the winter break. Debate as to whether Klopp’s side deserve to be regarded as among the best teams in English football history has been put on hold following a week in which they have seen their hopes of matching Arsenal’s Invincibles and Manchester United’s treble-winners ended. Tuesday night’s 2-0 FA Cup defeat at Stamford Bridge means that there are just two trophies left for Liverpool to fight for this season, and it may be difficult for the players to avoid having one eye on the must-win Champions League return leg against Atletico Madrid on Wednesday night. While their defence of the European crown remains up in the air, it still seems like only a matter of time before they regain their place as the champions of England, 30 years after lifting their 18th and most recent title. Last weekend’s shock 3-0 defeat to Watford – a result which statistically ranks among the biggest upsets in Premier League history – was undoubtedly a setback, but one which is unlikely to have a telling impact on the end result of the campaign with Liverpool still needing just 12 more points to guarantee the title. The loss does mean that they may not be able to wrap things up as early as they might have hoped, but if the top two continue to win from now on, then it means Liverpool would have the chance to clinch the title at the home of the current champions Manchester City on April 5. Regardless of the seemingly inevitable destination of the Premier League trophy, the recent defeats have thrown up issues which need correcting for Liverpool, most notably a sudden vulnerability in defence, which has seen Klopp’s side concede seven goals in their last three outings. Discounting the EFL Cup tie against Aston Villa when the Under-23 side played, that is as many goals as Liverpool had shipped in their previous 20 matches before then. It is the first time since August 2016 that Liverpool have conceded two or more goals in three consecutive games, and almost all of them have been down to individual defensive errors. There is also a concern at the other end considering the three recent defeats have all seen Liverpool fail to score; the Chelsea match was different as they created plenty of chances, but against both Atletico Madrid and Watford they looked short of ideas in the attacking third and managed only one shot on target in those two games combined. Indeed, the Watford loss was the first time Klopp’s side had drawn a blank in the league since March 2019 – 36 games ago – while they have not failed to score in successive top-flight outings since May 2018. Of course, the recent slump must be kept in the context of what has still been a season the likes of which we may never see again, but failure to pick up all three points against Bournemouth on Saturday would crank the pressure up a few more notches, particularly ahead of Atletico’s visit. Returning to Anfield should help them, though; while Liverpool have now lost three successive away games for the first time since November 2014, they have won their last 21 league outings in front of their own fans and are unbeaten in 54 stretching all the way back to April 2017. Another victory today would see Klopp’s class of 2019-20 surpass Bill Shankly’s 1972 team in terms of most consecutive home wins in English top-flight history, and given Bournemouth’s recent troubles on the road it would be another major surprise if that did not happen. The Cherries make the trip to Anfield having lost each of their last five away outings and eight of their last nine in the top flight, while no team have lost more games on their travels this season. Matters are more encouraging at home, where Bournemouth have only lost one of their last five league games, but their away form does not appear to put them in the best position to take advantage of a Liverpool side showing more signs of mortality than at any other stage of the campaign. Eddie Howe’s side have now slipped into the relegation zone despite faring better than Liverpool did against Chelsea in their last outing, earning a 2-2 draw against Frank Lampard’s side having scored twice in the space of three second-half minutes. Watford’s victory over Liverpool ensured that Bournemouth would end the weekend in the bottom three, incidentally, and Howe will no doubt be looking at the Hornets’ blueprint for inspiration of how to pull off a similar shock. Nigel Pearson’s side were similarly written off before ending the joint-longest winning run and second-longest unbeaten streak in English top-flight history, going on to record the biggest victory by a team inside the bottom three over top of the league since 1985. Emulating that achievement at Anfield is a much tougher test, of course, but the result will have at least given Bournemouth some belief, while Liverpool’s veil of invincibility has undoubtedly slipped in recent weeks. The Cherries may also draw encouragement from the fact that they have beaten both Chelsea and Manchester United already this season, although a visit to Anfield is an entirely different proposition right now. Bournemouth are likely to need one or two surprise results during the run-in, though, with Howe’s side still due to face six of the current top seven in their final 10 games of the campaign. Liverpool possible XI: Adrian, Alexander-Arnold, Gomez, Van Dijk, Robertson, Oxlade-Chamberlain, Fabinho, Wijnaldum, Salah, Firmino, Mane. Bournemouth possible XI: Ramsdale, Stacey, S Cook, Ake, Smith, Billing, Lerma, L Cook, Fraser, C Wilson, King.Tags: Atletico MadridChelseaFA CupJurgen KloppManchester CityNigel PearsonUEFA Champions LeagueWatfordlast_img read more

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Butler struggles in 59-42 win over Fordham after hurting left knee in practice

first_img Published on November 16, 2014 at 3:59 pm Contact Josh: jmhyber@syr.edu With six minutes gone in the second half and Syracuse leading by seven, head coach Quentin Hillsman called a designed play to create open space for Brianna Butler behind the 3-point line.“Cowboy basic out,” Hillsman yelled.Butler ran off a screen, caught a pass on the left wing and hoisted her third missed 3 of the game.It was an all-around rough afternoon for Butler, who played with a bruised left knee she suffered in practice this past week. The junior guard shot just 2-of-9 and finished with five points and three rebounds in the No. 24 Orange’s (1-0) 59-42 victory over Fordham (0-2) in the Carrier Dome on Sunday. With Brittney Sykes, Syracuse’s leading-scorer from last season, sidelined with a torn ACL, Fordham zoned in on SU’s second-leading scorer from last season, Butler.“To be quite honest, Brianna probably shouldn’t have played today,” Hillsman said. “You could visibly see she wasn’t herself today. I thought it was a gutsy, gutsy thing for her to play. She had an option not to play, and she chose to play.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“ … I thought that was one of the best five-point performances I’ve seen in a long time.”Butler said her play wasn’t limited by the injury. She shot 0-for-4 from 3 and missed three jumpers in 28 minutes. The junior was effective on the defensive end – logging three rebounds and two steals – and on drives to the basket. Her first points came on a drive through the left side of the lane to give the Orange a 9-2 lead five minutes into the first half.The junior’s only other made field goal came on a mirror image replay of her earlier layup. With 2:54 left in the first half, a Butler lay-in cut the Fordham lead to 18-16.“I just saw that there were openings,” said Butler, who walked into the postgame news conference with a large pack of ice taped around her left knee. “They were really pressuring me outside the 3-point line, so I saw a lot of openings to get inside the paint.”But the small forward began the second half with three missed 3s and didn’t attempt a shot for a 10-minute span from 13:16 to 3:37 left in the game. Fordham forward G’mrice Davis fouled Butler with 3:37 to play and Butler extended the Syracuse lead to 19 with her first free throw.But on a day in which the Orange pulled away late for a comfortable win, one of its go-to scorers wasn’t at full strength.“In practice we go hard every day, and with that, you’re going to get bumps and bruises,” Butler said. “ … I just tried to come out and do what I usually do and not focus on my knee.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Better Ballpark: Miller Park or Wrigley Field?

first_imgMiller ParkAs a Wisconsinite this was an easy choice. As a baseball aficionado, it wasn’t as easy, but history has it’s place … in history. I remain pretty confident in Miller Park.The lore of Miller Park starts outside the stadium where a bunch of pavement quickly turns into a mix of every type of blue and white pinstripes as Brewers fans tailgate about as well as anyone. Brats and beer are everywhere and frankly not a single substitute is worth it.If you’re visiting, you can’t go wrong drinking with Wisconsinites. They’d never let you down. And so, far before the game, your baseball experience is already off to an better start than the Chicagoans and their neighborhood.The scariest thing about that neighborhood is the stadium in the middle of it, actually. When I go to a baseball game, I’d prefer to be as safe as possible, not exposed to a concrete tangle that tends to fall apart at the corners from time to time. Miller Park’s newness kicks Wrigley’s falling bricks out to the side of I-90. Plus, there’s the roof.Ever have a great day go sour after a few raindrops? Not a problem in Milwaukee. Day ruined in Chicago’s north side. The retractable roof cost millions of dollars but it guarantees every fan that has a ticket has a dry seat in the stadium and a baseball game unfolding before them. It’s sadly not the case in Chi-town. The Midwest climate can be a dangerous thing for baseball’s multi-seasonal year; so don’t mess around with anything less than a guarantee.But the quality of baseball puts Miller Park over the top. The Billygoat and Bartman continue to curse the Cubbies from every taste at a championship. Meanwhile, the Brew Crew tend to weasel their way into talks of division contention seemingly every year.If I want to go to a baseball game, I want to see some winning baseball. This has happened much more in Milwaukee than Chicago over the last five years and this young season is no different. The Brewers have opened up a 14-12 record already in 2013. That includes a weekend sweep of the Cubs two weeks ago. I rest my case.-Sean ZakWrigley FieldTradition. Need I say more?Tradition and baseball go together like beer and tailgating. Over the years Wrigley Field has played host to some of the best baseball players to ever play the game. Think Ernie Banks, Sammy Sosa and Greg Maddux – one of which is a hall of famer,  while another was a part of one of the greatest slugoffs in baseball history in 1998 when his 66 home runs were barely bested by Mark McGwire’s 71. Miller Park can’t boast a back story like that.Sure the Brewers have been winners as of late, but in a comparison based purely on the venue, this seems like a cheap shot – kicking a losing team while it’s down. Besides, when you look at the two teams historically, the Cubs have had their share of success as well. In 2003 they made it to the National League Championship Series against the Florida Marlins before winning back-to-back division titles in 2007-2008.Nestled in the heart of “Wrigleyville,” Wrigley Field is a part of the very framework of the city around it – boasting a fan experience that can’t be found anywhere else. Where else can you sit in stands across the street on a rooftop and watch the game? Not to mention the close vicinity of some of the best restaurants and bars Chicago has to offer within minutes walking distance from the ballpark.So before you decide to “upgrade” to a new cushy, modern stadium, think about what you are giving up. Nothing beats sitting in the sun in Wrigley Field’s outfield bleacher section as a hot afternoon turns into cool summer evening, and as for a Cubs win, well that’s just a bonus.-Nick Danielslast_img read more

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Computer Game Reveals ‘Space-Time’ Neurons in the Eye

first_imgYou open the overstuffed kitchen cabinet and a drinking glass tumbles out. With a ninjalike reflex, you snatch it before it shatters on the floor, as if the movement of the object were being tracked before the information even reached your brain. According to one idea of how the circuitry of the eye processes visual data, that is literally what happens. Now, a deep anatomical study of a mouse retina—carried out by 120,000 members of the public—is bringing scientists a step closer to confirming the hypothesis.Researchers have known for decades that the eye does much more than just detect light. The dense patch of neurons in the retina also processes basic features of a scene before sending the information to the brain. For example, in 1964, scientists showed that some neurons in the retina fire up only in response to motion. What’s more, these “space-time” detectors have so-called direction selectivity, each one sensitive to objects moving in different directions. But exactly how that processing happens in the retina has remained a mystery.The stumbling block is a lack of fine-grained anatomical detail about how the neurons in the retina are wired up to each other. Although researchers have imaged the retina microscopically in ultrathin sections, no computer algorithm has been able to accurately trace out the borders of all the neurons to map the circuitry. At this point, only humans have good enough spatial reasoning to figure out what is part of a branching cell and what is just background noise in the images.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Enter the EyeWire project, an online game that recruits volunteers to map out those cellular contours within a mouse’s retina. The game was created and launched in December 2012 by a team led by H. Sebastian Seung, a neuroscientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. Players navigate their way through the retina one 4.5-micrometer tissue block at a time, coloring the branches of neurons along the way. Most of the effort gets done in massive online competitions between players vying to map out the most volume. (Watch a video of a player walking through a tissue block here.) By last week, the 120,000 EyeWire players had completed 2.3 million blocks. That may sound like a lot, but it is less than 2% of the retina.The sample is already enough to reveal new features, however. The EyeWire map shows two types of retinal cells with unprecedented resolution. The first, called starburst amacrine cells (SACs), have branches spread out in a flat, plate-shaped array perpendicular to the incoming light. The second, called bipolar cells (BPs), are smaller and bushy. The BPs come in two varieties, one of which reacts to light more slowly than the other—a time delay of about 50 milliseconds. The SACs and BPs are known to be related to direction sensitivity, but exactly how they sense direction remains to be discovered.Seung says the EyeWire map of how SACs and BPs are wired together holds the answer: a time-delay circuit. Because of the arrangement of BPs, the movement of an object across the surface of a SAC should make it fire up only in reaction to movement in one direction. The key insight is that BPs are not connected to the SAC branches willy-nilly, as was thought. Instead, the faster variety of BP clusters far out on the edges of the SAC, while the slower firing variety clusters close to the SAC center. Only if the light from an object moves from the center of the SAC outward does the signal from the innermost BP sync up with the faster outer BP, and that combined signal is required to activate the SAC. If instead the movement is in the opposite direction, those signals are out of sync and the SAC does not fire. Though it has yet to be confirmed experimentally, this mechanism could account for how the neurons in the retina detect the direction of movement of a moving object long before the information reaches the brain, the team reported online yesterday in Nature.The study is “truly amazing,” says Alexander Borst, a neuroscientist at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, Germany. Last year, Borst led the effort to map out a similar arrangement of neurons in the eye of a fruit fly. “This mechanism seems to be almost identical with the one proposed for direction selectivity in the insect visual system,” he says. If true, then some of the built-in functionality of the eye was likely invented more than 500 million years ago, when insects and vertebrates shared a common ancestor.last_img read more

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