Bracketologist Patrick Stevens on Syracuse’s Tournament chances: ‘I’m going to lean out at this point’

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ WASHINGTON — Following Syracuse’s (19-13, 9-9 Atlantic Coast) 72-71 loss to Pittsburgh in the ACC tournament on Wednesday at the Verizon Center, The Daily Orange spoke with bracketology expert Patrick Stevens, who correctly predicted all 68 teams in the NCAA Tournament in 2014.Here’s what he had to say as the Orange has no more games left until Selection Sunday.The Daily Orange: Where do things stand right now for Syracuse?Patrick Stevens: “Obviously Syracuse is in a much worse spot now than it was a few hours ago. It would take a remarkable amount mental gymnastics for the committee to select Syracuse ahead of Pittsburgh. But I also think that the profile that Syracuse has with those victories away from home are things that stand out. That doesn’t mean it’s going to be enough to get them in, but I think it’s going to keep them in the conversation for those last couple of spots.“My thought coming into the day was that they might be able to survive a loss. And it’s going to depend on what other people do. Since the last time we talked, you saw St. Mary’s enter the at-large field and I think that they’ve got a better profile overall than Syracuse does. You saw Monmouth enter the at-large field and I don’t think they have a better overall profile than Syracuse does. They’re obviously very vulnerable to things happening in other places. They’re going to clearly be rooting for teams that are already in good shape for Tournament bids to keep on winning and keep bid thieves out of the picture.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMore Coverage Syracuse loses 72-71 heartbreaker to Pittsburgh in ACC tournament Jim Boeheim on Syracuse’s NCAA Tournament chances: ‘It’s up to them’ Cameron Johnson and Ryan Luther flip script on Pittsburgh’s formula to beating Syracuse Frank Howard plays extended minutes and makes a costly mistake in loss to Pittsburgh D.O.: Are there specific games or teams that Syracuse fans should look for or root for?P.S.: There’s one spot that can really open up, and that’s out of the American where Temple is the top seed in the Tournament. But I don’t think that’s a team that will make the field without making a deep run in the conference tournament. If you’re a Syracuse fan, you’re going to want to see whoever wins that Cincinnati-Connecticut game just go win that tournament and maybe create an extra spot there. I think the teams that you’re looking at and would like to see get knocked out pretty quick, Oregon State, which has struggled away from home … a quick exit form the Pac-12 tournament would help. VCU, St. Bonaventure, those are teams that you certainly don’t want to see … Florida or Michigan or George Washington get hot like that either. Alabama would be in that mix as well. Clearly for Syracuse, you root for the top seeds. If you’re a Syracuse fan, you want to see a Texas A&M or a Kentucky go ahead and win the SEC. You don’t want to see San Diego State fall into the at-large field either, because that’s a team that hasn’t really messed up a whole lot.D.O.: Does it matter if teams that Syracuse already beat continue to do well in conference tournaments?P.S.: I don’t think at this point, those are two really good wins, but I don’t think that the Top 10 wins as opposed to Top 20 wins is going to make a whole lot of a difference. I think for Syracuse, the profile is the profile and you kind of have to live with it.D.O.: What if Pittsburgh were to win?P.S.: It would be nice for Syracuse if Pitt jumped into the Top 50, but at the end of the day, you’re kind of stuck with the 19-13 that you have. If you’re sitting there and you’re Syracuse, you just wish you hadn’t lost to St. John’s. That’s the game that’s ultimately going to cause them some problems.D.O.: What’s your prediction for Syracuse right now.P.S.: I’m going to lean out at this point. But I do think it’s possible, as things cycle through, and so many other teams still have to play, that they could play their way out and Syracuse is sitting there right on the cut line. But they’re obviously very, very vulnerable to whatever anybody else is doing. Comments Related Stories Jim Boeheim on Syracuse’s NCAA Tournament chances: ‘It’s up to them’Syracuse loses 72-71 heartbreaker to Pittsburgh in ACC tournamentCameron Johnson and Ryan Luther flip script on Pittsburgh’s formula to beating SyracuseFrank Howard plays extended minutes and makes a costly mistake in loss to PittsburghDajuan Coleman records double-double in loss to Pittsburgh Published on March 9, 2016 at 5:54 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3last_img read more

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Scott Longley: Beyond the review, optimism for UK betting shops

first_img Related Articles Share StumbleUpon Submit UKGC hails ‘delivered efficiencies’ of its revamped licence maintenance service  August 20, 2020 UKGC launches fourth National Lottery licence competition August 28, 2020 Share Winning Post: Swedish regulator pushes back on ‘Storebror’ approach to deposit limits August 24, 2020 Is the betting sector being too pessimistic about the long-term future prospects of retail betting? Should stakeholders welcome the disruption as a chance to reinvent retail betting’s overall proposition? Scott Longley gets the lowdown for SBC.The perils for land-based gambling enterprises in the UK were all too evident in the profit warning issued by bingo-to-casino operator Rank in early April.Like-for-like revenue at the Mecca bingo business was down 2 percent year-on-year for the 13 weeks to 1 April while revenues at the Grosvenor Casinos venues business were off by 9 percent.The company had its excuses. ‘The Beast from the East’ snowstorm that afflicted the UK in early March hurt footfall at both businesses, exacerbating what the company claims are a weaker consumer backdrop.This downbeat prognosis comes at a time of intense change for UK bookmakers. Not only is the decision (finally) imminent on the government’s triennial review on stakes and prizes, but the ownership of the country’s largest betting shop estate, Ladbrokes Coral, has also only just switched into the hands of GVC.But hope springs eternal, and among the suppliers into UK betting shops there is a suggestion that the pessimism, particularly over the impact of the likely cut in stakes, has been overdone.John Pettit, Playtech BGT“I think the impact of the decision is somewhat over-exaggerated,” says John Pettit, Managing Director for Playtech BGT Sport for the UK, Ireland, Asia and Australia, which supplies self-service betting terminals (SSBTs) to the majority of betting shops in the UK.“I think the decision will be £20 and £2 and that effectively shop revenues will go back to perhaps 70% or 80% of what they are today,” he adds. “This is effectively a tax on the super shops where machines can mean so much more to revenues. Overall I don’t think things will be as bad as they make out.”Rays of lightThe rise of the SSBT within the past five years or more is one manifestation of how the betting shop proposition in the UK has been changing even as the FOBT debate has raged.Pettit points out that the SSBT represents the perfect product for customers that want to enjoy the traditional benefits of retail anonymity allied to the wider sports offering available to online sports-betting punters.“We are trying to build a digital interface within a retail environment with all the attractions that significant for some people,” he says.Playtech BGT isn’t the only company viewing the potential disruption in UK betting shops as an opportunity.Heinz Kierchhoff – Sportradar“The stakes and prizes issue might open up the UK market for us; it is so big and so strategic,” says Heinz Kierchhoff, Managing Director of gaming at Sportradar.“Money will redirect within betting shops. Looking at it from a product perspective I think virtuals have huge potential and football is definitely under-represented in the virtual offering in the UK.”“That is because of the tradition of dogs and horses. If you see a shop today, it has big screens with dogs and horses and live commentary and football is not represented in the way that it is in Italy.”UK betting shops is one sector that should be looking at how the retail experience has developed in the rest of Europe for indicators of how it can survive and thrive without the prop of the vast majority of B2 gaming machine revenues.“The focus on omni-channel for multi-channel operators is starting to deliver a great user experience and a regular focus on product innovation is always a good idea – whether it’s the best from overseas, online or entirely new products,” says Mike Bogie, Director of Lottoland Solutions.Mike Bogie – LottolandThe lotto product is delivered via an SSBT and, as Pearson adds, it adds a “compelling” new event betting opportunity for retail. “The ability to bet small stakes for the chance to win huge prizes appeals to existing and new shop customers,” she says. “With more betting data we can keep learning and adapt to provide more event betting markets via the SSBT channel.”Indeed, the SSBT is also a likely route for more virtual sports in betting shops. Kierchhoff suggests the company is already trialling this with Eurobet in Italy. “We are looking at putting virtuals on SSBTs in Italy,” he says. “With the regulations, there is now more space available to do business there. That will be a mix of being on the screen on the wall and betting on the SSBT. That is what we mean by full flexibility.”None of the new products will completely repair the hole in the finances for betting shop retailers. But if there is life in the old dog yet, it might well be that a move to a broader product mix will hold the key to high-street longevity.“There is obviously a challenge but shops have shown historically they are resilient,” says Pettit. “They have fought off other challenges; the introduction of the national lottery, for instance. Like everyone else we want a buoyant retail sector.”__________________The Betting industry’s future enterprise and operational context will be discussed at the upcoming ‘Betting on Sports Conference’ (#boscon2018 – Olympia London-17-20 September 2018). Click on the below banner for more information…last_img read more

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Legislative report: Ed Trimmer, 79th District – March 13, 2014

first_imgSchool                                     Capital Outlay State Aid        LOB Equalized State Aid Opponents argue that states can opt-out of the standards.  That is true and that is why they are not a federal mandate. Ed Trimmerby Ed Trimmer, state representative of the 79th District — The Kansas Legislature has reached its halfway point and I wanted to share some of my perceptions and also give you an update on where we are with some of the most important issues discussed to date.  I will group the issues by subject area and break my update into several parts that I will send over the next several days.PART 1 EDUCATIONThe Supreme Court Decision on the “Gannon” school funding issue:The most important education issue to legislators and the public, alike, is the recent Kansas Supreme Court decision regarding school funding.  The court split its decision between two concepts; equity and adequacy of funding.Two issues were raised in regard to equity.  The court ruled that the elimination of equalized capital outlay funds in 2010, which reduced funding to about 2/3 of Kansas school districts, and the reduction of equalized Local Option Budget (LOB) funding to low valuation districts, created a significant inequity among schools.  The court suggested that if about 129 million dollars would be added to remove these inequities, the finance formula would be constitutional in regard to equity.  The following table shows how much of an increase schools in the 79th district would receive if the Legislature allocates the full 129 million dollars. Local property taxpayers should be happy about this decision because the increased equalized LOB funds, which would affect all schools in the 79th district, would allow school districts to raise their LOB budgets up to the 30% maximum without raising property taxes and any amount above the 30 percent maximum LOB would have be used to reduce local property taxes.In regard to adequacy, the court sent the proposed increase to the Base State Aid Per Pupil (BSAPP) back to the lower court for more study, using a Kentucky model, which bases adequacy on more than just “At-Risk” funding.The legislature could, of course, decide to ignore the court ruling or move funds from other education budget areas but that could result in the court nullifying the LOB altogether which would remove about 25% of school funding statewide. Health Education in Public Schools:A bill to change the current law on health education has stalled in the House Education Committee at this point.  Current law allows parents to see all curriculum used in a district’s health class.  Parents can also opt their children out of a health program if they choose.  Because of one case of an inappropriate poster in one school, which was dealt with by the local district, the new bill would require all districts to have an opt-in requirement for participation in a health class.  The majority of committee members were not in favor of the bill because of the following issues:These courses have been successful in reducing the number of sexually transmitted diseases.  Unfortunately, these diseases still remain a problem in Kansas.  In the first six months of 2013 more that 2000 Kansas children ages 15-19 contracted a sexually transmitted disease.  There is still a need for this information to reach our children. The opt-in provision would mean that parents, who do not take an active role in their children’s education, would be less likely to enroll their students in a health class.  Many education and health professionals feel these are the children who are most at risk of contracting a sexually transmitted disease.  Sex education should be taught at home, but the reality is that in many homes it isn’t. Opponents argue that certain stories about alternative lifestyles and sex education would be mandated.  None of the currently adopted standards require the use of any specific materials. That is up to each district.  The standards focus on comprehension skills, math skills, science discovery skills and social science concepts. Opponents argue that the standards will take away local control.  Local districts are allowed to establish the curriculum, select textbooks, and determine how the standards would be incorporated into their curriculum.  The federal No Child Left Behind program forced all districts to teach to the same test.center_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Belle Plaine                                         $18,962                                   $244,421Oxford                                                 $0                                            $122,041Udall                                                   $0                                            $113,666Winfield                                              $206,069                                 $664,434 Opponents argue that the common core standards are a vehicle for the federal government to gather individual student information.  No new reports to the federal government are required and all data is sent as aggregate data.  No individual student would be identified.  The bill would make it impossible for educational institutions in Kansas to send transcripts to any out of state college or entity.In addition, common core standards have been embraced by the U.S. Military and most corporations, because they would help schools standardize concepts from state to state at each grade level. This would benefit students who move from district to district.  For example, if the math concepts of division are taught at one grade level in all schools a student who moves from one school to another or one state to another would not miss out on learning these concepts.  The local district would still control how these concepts would be taught.My next update will include but may not be limited to discussion of the Religious Freedom bill, the Spanking bill, and the Renewable Portfolio Energy Standards bill. Opponents argue that students would only study test questions.  The tests have not been written at this point, but will not be multiple choice as the “No Child Left Behind” program requires. Common Core Standards:A bill has been heard in committee and there were more than seventy conferees, about half in favor of elimination of the standards and half against.  I believe most of the comments against the common core standards, while well meaning, were based on misinformation provided by a few interest groups.  The following is a list of arguments against the standards and what I believe are the reasons why the majority of the committee currently opposes elimination of the standards.  I believe these reasons are why the same legislation failed in the House last session.Opponents of the common core standards believe they are a federal mandate.  Common core standards were created by the Association of State Governors and the Council of State Education officers.  Kansas was a voting member of this compact and has created its own standards called Kansas College and Career Readiness Standards.  Kansas is also creating its own assessments.  The “No Child Left Behind” program was a federal mandate, which is why states decided to create an alternative. Opponents argue that the standards are too low and not rigorous enough.  All educational professionals, from whom we heard, believe the standards would be more rigorous.  They also believe the standards allow teachers the freedom to teach concepts and not just answers to test questions.  The standards allow for project based learning which Finland uses effectively and is why they top the charts on international assessments.last_img read more

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