10 months agoWolves set for Abraham deal – but Chelsea won’t consider immediate sale

first_imgWolves set for Abraham deal – but Chelsea won’t consider immediate saleby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWolves are confident of closing a deal for Tammy Abraham – however Chelsea insist they do not want to lose the striker permanently.The Daily Mail says Abraham, currently on-loan at Aston Villa, is keen to play in the Premier League and Wolves want competition for Raul Jimenez. Chelsea, who have until January 14 to trigger his recall, are reluctant to agree to a sale now despite Wolves intimating they would be willing to offer around £18m.The Stamford Bridge club will wait to see how he performs.They are aware and know that his value could increase significantly by the summer if he does well. TagsTransfersLoan MarketAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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9 months agoBarcelona coach Valverde coy over plans for Chelsea striker Morata

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Barcelona coach Valverde coy over plans for Chelsea striker Morataby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona coach Ernesto Valverde is coy over talk of a move for Chelsea striker Alvaro Morata this week.Chelsea head coach Maurizio Sarri fuelled speculation Morata could be set to depart Stamford Bridge when he told reporters on Friday: “If Morata will go to another club we will need a replacement.”Valverde was coy on Barcelona’s reported interest in the Spain international when he was asked directly about Morata ahead of Sunday’s visit of Eibar.”I can only say the same thing,” Valverde said. “That he’s a great player, that he’s at another team and that we respect that a lot.” last_img read more

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A Michigan Fan Got A Tattoo Of Jim Harbaugh On Saved By The Bell

first_imgJim Harbaugh speaks as he is introduced as the new Head Coach of the University of Michigan football team.ANN ARBOR, MI – DECEMBER 30: Jim Harbaugh speaks as he is introduced as the new Head Coach of the University of Michigan football team at the Junge Family Champions Center on December 30, 2014 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)Michigan fans are still pretty pumped about the hiring of former Wolverines quarterback Jim Harbaugh as head coach. One has chosen a rather interesting way to convey that excitement. A Twitter user who goes by the name of Mark the Nomad has gotten a tattoo that pays homage to Harbaugh’s 1994 appearance on the television show Saved By The Bell. No, really.Mark claims that he’s received the most negative feedback from Columbus, Ohio. That doesn’t surprise anyone.I have a very important announcement to make.— Mark (@MarktheNomad) April 4, 2015I want all of you to stop what you’re doing and look.— Mark (@MarktheNomad) April 4, 2015So, this just happened: #GoBlue pic.twitter.com/jqlqyDoFsM— Mark (@MarktheNomad) April 4, 2015A huge thanks to those who donated to the tattoo fund on GoFundMe. I certainly didn’t think it’d pick up traction the way it did.— Mark (@MarktheNomad) April 4, 2015I had the best tattoo artist, IMHO, on the planet. If you’re in the Sarasota area, hell if you’re in Florida, go see Caitlin at Trap Ink.— Mark (@MarktheNomad) April 4, 2015You may be shocked to learn that most of the negative feedback I’ve received is via Columbus, Ohio.— Mark (@MarktheNomad) April 4, 2015If we’re being honest, it’s actually some high-quality ink. That being said, he’s probably going to get tired of explaining it to everyone he ever meets.last_img read more

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The nuclear industry is making a big bet on small power plants

first_img Provided by The Conversation This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Efforts to build the nation’s first “advanced small modular reactor,” or SMR, in Idaho, are on track for it to become operational by the mid-2020s. The project took a crucial step forward when the company behind it, NuScale, secured an important security certification from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. But the first ones could be generating power by 2020 in China, Argentina and Russia, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency. The debate continues over whether this technology is worth pursuing, but the nuclear industry isn’t waiting for a verdict. Nor, as an energy scholar, do I think it should. This new generation of smaller and more technologically advanced reactors offer many advantages, including an assembly-line approach to production, vastly reduced meltdown risks and greater flexibility in terms of where they can be located, among others. How small is small?Most small modular reactors now in the works range between 50 megawatts – roughly enough power for 60,000 modern U.S. homes – and 200 megawatts. And there are designs for even smaller “mini” or “micro-reactors” that generate as few as 4 megawatts.In contrast, full-sized nuclear reactors built today will generate about 1,000-1,600 megawatts of electricity, although many built before 1990, including over half the 99 reactors now operating in the U.S., are smaller than this. Explore further NuScale Power aims to build the nation’s first advanced small modular reactor. Credit: U.S. Department of Energycenter_img UAE says its first nuclear reactor complete Until now, generating nuclear power has required massive facilities surrounded by acres of buildings, electrical infrastructure, roads, parking lots and more. The nuclear industry is trying to change that picture – by going small. Citation: The nuclear industry is making a big bet on small power plants (2018, June 8) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-nuclear-industry-big-small-power.html But small nuclear reactors aren’t actually new. India has the most, with 18 reactors with capacity ranging between 90 and 220 megawatts, which were built between 1981 and 2011.The U.S., Russia, China, India, France and the U.K. operate hundreds of nuclear submarines and aircraft carriers. Russia has dozens of nuclear-powered icebreakers cruising around the Arctic, and its first floating nuclear power plant has been completed and will be deployed in 2019 near the town of Pevek in East Siberia. The Siberian plant will replace four 12-megawatt reactors the Soviets built in the 1970s to power a remote town and administrative center, as well as mining and oil drilling operations.Even though the reactors will be small, they may operate at much bigger power plants with multiple reactors. NuScale, for example, wants to install 12 reactors at its initial Idaho site. Based on the company’s latest projections, it will have a total capacity of 720 megawatts.A global trendPrivate and state-owned companies are seeking to build these small power plants in about a dozen countries so far, including the U.S. and the U.K.France, which gets three-quarters of its electricity from nuclear energy, and Canada may soon join the fray.This global interest in small modular reactors comes as more standard nuclear reactors are being decommissioned than are under construction. Some advantagesProponents of these advanced small modular reactors say they will be easier to build and more flexible in terms of where they can be located than the larger kind. The word “modular” refers to how they will be built in factory-like settings, ready for hauling either fully assembled or in easily connected parts by truck, rail or sea. These reactors can potentially power rural towns, industrial plants, mountainous areas and military bases, as well as urban districts and ports. Small modular reactors may also prove handy for industrial uses.Small modular reactors will differ from the smaller reactors already deployed because of their new technologies. These advances are intended to make it less likely or even impossible for them to melt down or explode, as happened during Japan’s Fukushima disaster.The power plants where these small reactors will be located will have added protections against sabotage and the theft of radioactive material. For example, they may be equipped with cooling systems that continue working even if no operators are present and all electric power is lost. In many cases, the entire reactor and steam-generating equipment will be below ground to safeguard these facilities during natural disasters like the earthquake and tsunamis that led three Fukushima Daiichi reactors to melt down. Like renewable energy, nuclear power emits no carbon. And compared to wind and solar power, which are intermittent sources, or hydropower, which is affected by seasonal changes and droughts, it operates all the time and has a much smaller footprint.As a result, small modular reactors could be paired with renewable sources as a substitute for coal-fired or natural gas plants. Yet they will probably have to compete with advanced energy storage systems for that market. Concerns and costsWhether these advantages materialize, obviously, remains to be seen once these reactors are deployed. Some experts are skeptical of the industry’s promises and expectations.Although small modular reactors are designed to produce less radioactive waste than standard, bigger reactors for the same amount of power, the issue of where to safely dispose of nuclear waste remains unresolved. Small modular reactors face other challenges, some of their own making.Strong interest in the potential global market has led many companies to propose their own individual reactor designs. In my opinion, there are already too many versions out there. Before long, a shakeout will occur.And, especially in the U.S., there is currently no clarity regarding the length of time required for licensing new reactor designs lacking any commercial track record – creating a lot of regulatory uncertainty.It’s also unclear what small modular reactor-generated power will cost. That will probably remain the case for at least the next 10 to 15 years, until a few designs are actually built and operating.Some experts foresee small modular reactors penciling out at levels that could be higher than for full-sized reactors which generally cost more to build and operate than other options, like natural gas, for the same amount of power. NuScale, however, predicts that its SMRs will be more competitive than that in terms of their cost.And some observers fear that reactor owners might cut corners to reduce costs, compromising safety or security.Although their costs are unclear and their advantages relative to other energy choices remain unproven, I believe these small reactors, as non-carbon sources, are needed to help resolve the energy challenges of our time. And the rest of the world seems ready to give them a try with or without the U.S.last_img read more

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Celebrating Kuchings culture and heritage

first_img Et Cetera , Rainforest Fringe Festival , Sarawak , Sharon Ling , Culture , Arts , Tourism I had the opportunity to interview Loh and he said his aim was to show people a different perspective of the places that they think they know, and through that to inspire a deeper appreciation of Sarawak’s beauty and rich culture.”I want to show people something they’ve not seen before. So you won’t find me shooting a scene that everyone can see.”That’s why I took up drone (photography) because immediately it gives you a different perspective,” he explained.A personal highlight was the Museum of Kuching at the Old Court House, a pop-up exhibit tracing Kuching’s journey from the time of James Brooke’s arrival to its present-day status as the state capital.What stood out was its clever use of augmented reality (AR) to enhance the viewing experience, including an animation of James Brooke speaking about Sarawak and archive footage of the centenary celebration of Brooke rule in 1942, the handover to British colonial rule and the proclamation of Malaysia’s formation in 1963.Viewed on tablets handed out to visitors, the AR portions brought history to life and gave an intriguing glimpse of Kuching’s past.The good news is that the Museum of Kuching is not just a festival event but will become a permanent exhibition. It is currently in the process of inviting Kuchingites to record and share their stories and memories of their city, to be displayed in the permanent museum.In the final panel in the Museum of Kuching, we read this: “Today, Kuching is a hub of creative industries, arts, culture and heritage, and a tourism hotspot for those seeking something a little bit different. Major community festivals have taken root – the Rainforest Fringe and What About Kuching festivals are helping to curate for the community and visitors what it means to be a Kuchingite today.In concert with this, the younger generations are now beginning to return and settle here in their hometown, reversing a trend of outward migration and bringing with them a sense of vibrancy and civic pride.”This optimism sums up what the Rainforest Fringe Festival and similar events are about – preserving and celebrating heritage but also encouraging creativity and innovation so that our cultural traditions live on and remain relevant.More importantly, all this creative energy should be first and foremost be directed at local needs and interests, rather than focusing solely on visitors. Because it’s when the local community appreciates and enjoys our own heritage and culture that we can preserve and sustain it for generations to come. {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Tech News 11 Jul 2019 YouCam brings haute couture beauty looks to users via augmented reality Metro News 09 Jul 2019 Capturing beauty from above THE Rainforest Fringe Festival has become a firm fixture on Kuching’s calendar of events ever since it burst onto the scene in 2017.Back for its third edition this past week, the festival was packed with all manner of events and activities related to arts, culture and heritage, from music and storytelling performances to exhibitions, talks and art installations.In short, there were so many things happening and no time to see them all, but what I did manage to catch was generally worthwhile.For a start, the “Over Sarawak” exhibition by photojournalist David ST Loh at the UOB Building displayed some striking shots of notable landmarks and less-well-known scenes in Sarawak, including a number of images taken directly from above with a drone.center_img Tags / Keywords: Related News Related News Metro News 13 Jun 2019 Musical on James Brooke with new songs and choreographylast_img read more

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