GAA NEWS: DONEGAL MINOR HURLING BOARD NOTES

first_imgDONEGAL MINOR HURLING BOARD NOTESMinorSt Eunans were too strong for Setanta and had a comfortable win in O’Donnell Park.Burt and Aodh Ruadh had a close game inBallyshannon and it was the Burt men’s ability to get goals that proved the difference as they won 3.3 to 0.7….Goals also proved the difference in Carndonagh as Carndonagh and Letterkenny Gaels had a tough battle and the Carn men won 4.8 to 0.8. U 14 Div 1In Hibernian Park Burt and St Eunans had a thrilling game where both teams enjoyed spells of dominance in the end the Burt lads came out on top 5.3 to 2.8.Div 2Aodh Ruadh made the long trip to Gaothdobhair to take on Dungloe/Gaothdobhair, this was another thrilling game that went from end to end with both teams being on top at different stages. When the final whistle went it was Aodh Ruadh who were on top 7.9 to 6.6. GAA NEWS: DONEGAL MINOR HURLING BOARD NOTES was last modified: May 6th, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalMInor Hurling Board noteslast_img read more

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The Ashes: Australia pace battery better than 2013-14 trio, says Ryan Harris

first_imgFormer Australia quick Ryan Harris, who was one of the architects of England’s 0-5 whitewash in the 2013-14 Ashes, feels the current fast bowling trio of Mitchell Starc, Josh Hazlewood and Pat Cummins is more potent.Harris, who claimed 22 wickets and formed a formidable combination with left-armer Mitchell Johnson and Peter Siddle during the 2013-14 edition, believes it will be the pace attacks of both sides that will decide the course of the series, starting in Brisbane from November 23.”Hazlewood’s probably doing the job that I did (four years ago) and he’s quicker than me, and he gets more bounce,” Harris said at the Adelaide Oval ahead of the four-day day-night tour game against England that starts on Wednesday. (Also read:  England paceman Steven Finn ruled out with knee injury)”And you’ve got Starc who can definitely do a Johnson role, and you’ve got Cummins so you’ve probably got an extra bit of pace. Cummins on his day he’s fast as well.”Obviously we did a good job last time, but the key is going to be working as a team, as a bowling unit. That’s what we did well last time and obviously got the results,” the 38-year-old added.Reuters PhotoReuters Photo While the first Test will be played at the Gabba in Brisbane, the second match will be a day-night affair at Adelaide from December 2-6.The third Test will be played at the WACA Ground in Perth from December 14-18 while the fourth match will be played on Boxing Day in Melbourne followed by the final Test in Sydney from January 4-8.advertisementlast_img read more

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LaVar Ball Crazy or a Genius LaMelo and LiAngelo

I need LaVar Ball to succeed, man. I need them to become mega millionaires. Like I need this to happen.— Mel Blunt (@KNGSHxT) December 7, 2017 InstagramIt looks like the relationship between the Ball family and the UCLA Basketball program is done forever.As ESPN reports, LaMelo and LiAngelo Ball — ages 16 and 19 respectively — just signed with the sports agent Harrison Gaines and will skip college to play overseas. LiAngelo played for the storied UCLA Bruins until he was suspended for shoplifting in China last month. Afterwards, his dad LaVar Ball pulled him out of school completely.  The eldest brother Lonzo Ball played for the university as well, but just one year before he headed to the NBA to play for the Los Angeles Lakers. The main reason for sending LaMelo and LiAngelo overseas is so they can be teammates, their dad explained.“I don’t care about the money,” said LaVar. “I want them to go somewhere where they will play them together on the court at the same time. The priority is for the boys to play on the same team.”In October, the 50-year-old father withdrew LaMelo from Chino Hills High School, and the original plan was to enroll him in UCLA in two years time. “He’s not going to play college basketball,” said LaVar.It seems getting his boys to play competitively again is another reason LaVar wants to send them overseas since LiAngelo was suspended from UCLA. Moreover, there’s a good chance that his stock would’ve fallen come NBA Draft time. So far, there have been a few overseas teams that have expressed interest in the two younger Ball brothers but nothing has been confirmed yet. “I don’t know the deals and who is offering what,” LaVar stated. “I’m letting Harrison handle all that, but I know there are a few teams interested. I just need to get them playing again.”Plus, no matter what country LaMelo and LiAngelo will play in, their dad said he’ll be there with them periodically, as well as other family members.“There will be three people with them all the time,” stated LaVar. “I’ll go back and forth and probably stay out there a while at first.”Of course, it didn’t take long for people to chime in with their opinions about the Ball brother playing overseas and not going to school. “How does it feel to know you’ve completely ruined your two youngest son’s chances of making it pro?” one person wrote on LaVar’s Instagram page.“What was the whole point of Gelo and Melo getting scholarships to UCLA if you’re just pulling them right out?” another person asked. “You know how many people would die for a scholarship?”Related news: LaVar BallTrump Says LaVar Ball Is a ‘Poor Man’s Don King’LaVar Ball Isn’t Backing Down from Michael Jordan, Says He Could ‘Beat Him with One Hand’LaVar Ball Pulling AAU Team Off Floor Over ‘Bad’ Call Earns Immdiate Scorn from Disgusted Twitter UsersOthers, however, came to the father’s defense and compared him to Hollywood parents like Kris Kardashian. Some folks also told people to mind their business.“What he does with his kids doesn’t concern you.” He’s helping Gelo,” wrote Instagram user Scott James Jr. “What he’s doing to Melo is questionable. How is that deflecting when you criticize this man for creating a different path for his kids like Hollywood parents do all the time.”Between creating his own shoe and fashion brand, and sending his kids overseas instead of college, it’s clear that LaVar is taking unprecedented steps to get his boys to the NBA. So far, at least in Lonzo’s case, his plan has worked, despite some of the backlash.But is what that Instagram user said correct? Did papa Ball just ruin his boy’s chances of getting to the NBA?To get an answer we reached out to former ESPN employee, Sports Anchor and reporter Derwin Worrell, who said things may be challenging for the Balls, but they still have a good chance of making it in the U.S.“They can still get to the NBA without going to college,” Worrell told Atlantic Black Star. “They will have less exposure by playing overseas. But some NBA teams have great scouts overseas, so if they can really play, they will get noticed and because of the Ball name, NBA teams will definitely be watching.”Basketball fans and other folks familiar with the Balls will surely be watching too, just to see if LaVar’s master plan of sending his kids overseas will work out.Wonder if Lavar Ball ever stopped and asked his kids “what do you want to do?”— Rod Bridgers (@rod_bridgers) December 7, 2017 If people think Lavar Ball is sending his kids overseas just because of basketball y’all crazy, this is a smart man, he just want to promote the BBB brand, that man not stupid y’all better put some respect on his name, IT’S ALL ABOUT THE BAG 💼💯💯💯@bigballerbrand— Coach Twin (@twintowers504) December 7, 2017 LaVar Ball reminds me of the little league Dad who coaches his kid and thinks the kid is way better than he really is. #TheBalls— Tony Patelis (@CollegeHoopNews) December 7, 2017 Lavar Ball is absolutely tanking the futures of his sons and I’m already getting excited for how depressing the 30 for 30 is go to be— Matt Kulka (@kulkanator) December 7, 2017 Thank you Lavar Ball for pulling your sons out of the US basketball systems now they can be Europe’s problem— chris.barry (@beardog40) December 7, 2017 The NCAA is garbage, Lavar Ball is right, and in 20 years he’ll be seen as a prophet. Don’t you @ me either.— Kazeem Famuyide (@RealLifeKaz) December 6, 2017 Lavar ball one of the goats— Davir Hamilton (@EspnHam9) December 7, 2017 Lavar Ball is the Kris Jenner of basketball.— rae-rae ♍️ (@ThatsSoRavii) December 7, 2017 Lavar Ball out here turning the tables 😂😂😂😂😂😂— 8Eye™ (@JaimeBoyer) December 7, 2017 read more

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One Last Dispatch From The Land Of Chess Kings And Billionaires

Left: Neil deGrasse Tyson, a celebrated astrophysicist, and Fabiano Caruana, the No. 2 ranked chess player in the world, chatted about baseball. Right: Peter Thiel showed up for the decisive tiebreaker round and had a grandmaster at his side to explain the games live. After the match — after the trophy presentation and the cake and the champagne — our photographer and I tracked down the Norwegian contingent at an after-after-party at a steakhouse a couple miles uptown. It was a festive scene. Holiday garland and lights festooned the bannisters and the restaurant was a cozy respite from the cold and rainy November day outside. Carlsen was sitting at a far table in the crowded dining room with about 50 others. He was eating. With a fork. Like a person. It was odd to see him with something other than a chess piece in his hand.I wanted to talk to him. I’d been watching him for hours most days for the past three weeks. But honestly I had no idea what I’d say. Carlsen famously hates interviews. But I was saved. “No questions. Definitely no,” his manager, Espen Agdestein, told us. “He’s very tired. We’re just relaxing.”I’m not Carlsen. But I understood. Left: While waiting for the title ceremony, Magnus Carlsen is finally able to relax with his father by his side. Right: Following his defeat, Karjakin was clearly disappointed while speaking to the Russian media. He confirmed rumors about travelling to New York with a Virgin Mary icon. Left: Magnus Carlsen, 26, at the World Chess Championship’s opening gala at the Plaza Hotel in New York City. Right: Sergey Karjakin, 26, tests the overhead lights in the playing hall. All photographs by Misha Friedman There are other internal chess-world squabbles. Agon Limited, the match’s organizer, filed an application for a restraining order and injunction against a number of popular third-party chess websites, just before the match began. The websites’ alleged transgression? Relaying chess moves live, which Agon saw as a violation. The application was denied by a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, who wrote that “robust reporting of factual data concerning the contestants’ moves” best served the public interest. Agon’s CEO, Ilya Merenzon, told me that the company would continue to pursue the matter in court, and was also proposing legislation to cement their rights to the games they organize.I discussed the case with Macauley Peterson, the content director for chess24, one of the defendants, on the floor of the venue during one of the early games. He kept glancing away from me at people walking by. He said he was worried about who might be eavesdropping.The tournament’s organizers have declared their own victory, though, bragging that the 20-day biennial championship had drawn some 10,000 spectators to its location in the South Street Seaport. But that’s less than, say, half the average attendance of the worst team in baseball for any one of its 81 home games this year. And the event’s only two main sponsors were PhosAgro, a Russian producer of phosphate-based fertilizer, and EG Capital Advisors, a Russian investment management company. Not exactly Nike and Coca-Cola. Left: A branded vodka bar assured VIPs were sufficiently entertained throughout the tournament. Right: Ekaterina, a Karjakin family friend, flew in from Moscow just for the tiebreaker round. Spectators in the VIP lounge. A production team from Russia created an atmosphere for VIPs more often seen in Moscow than Manhattan. Tickets were expensive, but there were a lot of young fans at every game, especially on weekends. You had to elbow your way through knots of onlookers to get anywhere in the venue’s sprawling VIP wing. Men in suits and expensive shoes crowded around TVs, watching the games and sipping martinis. The room was at a low murmur — equal parts English and Russian with an occasional dash of Norwegian. The clinking of glasses and the ratatat of ice in cocktail shakers punctuated the chess talk.Like a Russian nesting doll, a VVIP section had been set up for Peter Thiel, the Silicon Valley billionaire, and company within the VIP section. It was newly roped off and closely monitored by scary-looking bodyguards. Thiel, a Donald Trump supporter and a strong chess player himself, and Yuri Milner, the Russian billionaire venture capitalist, sat at a board inside. With apologies to Beyoncé, it was $6 billion at a chess table. Accompanying them: Bennett Miller, who directed “Foxcatcher,” about the wrestling-obsessed murderer and multimillionaire heir to the du Pont fortune, and the Icelandic grandmaster Hedinn Steingrimsson, who was giving them a private analysis of the ongoing championship game taking place just a few yards away.A buffet and wine bar had been installed for the guests from Silicon Valley who’d arrived that day, and bored-looking members of their entourages lolled on large couches, poking at iPhones. Word around the venue was that the billionaires had paid $50,000 for these privileges. (The match’s organizer wouldn’t comment on the figure.) Much later in the evening, some other journalists and I raided their buffet, eating what must have been thousands of dollars worth of cold mini tacos.“Are you security?” the writer Brin-Jonathan Butler asked one of the well-dressed, well-built men keeping close watch over the well-heeled chess lesson.“Something like that,” he responded ominously. “I wouldn’t bother them, if you don’t mind.”This World Chess Championship scene was somewhere at the intersection of Bond film, Trump fundraiser and museum gala. Watching an elite chess match in person is at once enjoyable and discomfiting. You follow the players’ actions — their moves, their mannerisms — for long stretches of time. You hang on each one and imbue it with meaning. You become so familiar with their moves that you can rattle them off later from memory: “queen to h6,” say, or “rook to e2.” You try to understand why the players did what they did. The moves can be beautiful or inscrutable or frustrating or disappointing. You try to imagine what you would do if you were in one of their chairs. You try to predict what they will do next. You try and make sense of their postgame explanations. But you aren’t them, and you can never really understand.On Wednesday, the final day of the World Chess Championship, hundreds crowded into the Fulton Market Building in lower Manhattan to watch, trying to understand. Magnus Carlsen, the defending champion, No. 1-rated player in the world and the closest thing the sport has to a rock star, was facing his challenger, Sergey Karjakin of Russia, in a series of speedy tiebreaker games. The 12 lengthy games that had stretched over the previous 19 days — I attended 11 in person — ended tied and the two grandmasters were back in their chairs in a soundproof glass box to break the deadlock. It was the biggest day in chess in many years. Carlsen, the former wunderkind, was clinging to his title and his legacy, while Karjakin and the Russians were hoping for a return to the days of Soviet chess hegemony. On the fourth game of the tiebreaker, and the 16th of the match, Carlsen attacked the Russian’s king, Karjakin resigned and the two shook hands. It was over. Despite the high-powered, moneyed interest, and its prime New York City location, the match was sparsely covered by the American press — as chess is generally — and given little attention outside the core chess world. It’s unlikely to increase the game’s reach or exposure as the organizers may have hoped. That did happen once in the States — in 1972 — but that was because of Bobby Fischer.The troublesome shadow of Fischer stretches over every conversation of chess’s success and future in the U.S. He was the best American player of all time, and its only modern world champion. His legacy is stained by his vocal anti-Semitism, and comments that he was pleased with the terrorism on Sept. 11, among other things. But in his chess prime, he carried the U.S. on his back while sitting at the board, having taught himself the game, largely alone, in a shabby Brooklyn apartment. And he won.While this year’s championship lacked the colorful characters and Cold War narrative of Fischer’s title run — although some journalists tried to revive them — it did have some of the controversy.Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, the president of the game’s international governing body, FIDE, was absent from the match, having been sanctioned by the U.S. for business connections with the Assad regime in Syria. Ilyumzhinov is no stranger to controversy. He insists he was abducted by aliens. They were wearing yellow spacesuits and nabbed him from his Moscow apartment in 1997, taking him away to a distant star. He considers chess “a gift from extraterrestrial civilizations.” But despite the controversy and the finances, what’s really missing from chess is a character.The U.S. has three players in the world Top 10, any one of whom could have a shot at challenging Carlsen for the title in two years. They’re undeniably fantastic players. But they seem less like compelling national characters — and less like artists — than Fischer did. They’re technicians, raised in a computer-chess age. Carlsen ended the match and extended his world championship reign with a beautiful move on Wednesday evening — whether he’d admit its beauty or not — sacrificing his queen to entrap Karjakin’s king. But in one of the postgame press conferences, Carlsen said chess was a sport and a science. For art, he said, you’d “have to look elsewhere.” read more

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Bicycling Unveils Major Redesign Boosts Budgets By DoubleDigits

first_imgMagazine redesigns are a dime a dozen but the editorial and design facelift that Rodale’s Bicycling is unveiling with its June issue is a “significant rebirth of the brand,” according to editor-in-chief Peter Flax. “A lot of time people change typefaces and update a couple departments and call it a redesign,” he adds. “That’s not what we’re doing here.” Bicycling celebrates its 50th anniversary this year and a major redesign has been the focus since Flax joined the magazine last summer. The cover boasts a new logo and a boost from 70-pound paper stock to 100-pound stock, while a new front-of-book-section called “Know How” offers service for readers.Major investments are being made in photography and freelance editorial. “When we were leading up to the redesign we had a lot of ideas but Rodale made a significant investment in market research to enlighten what we were doing,” says Flax. “We talked to both existing readers and prospective readers about what they want in print and what they want digitally and in print what they want is story-telling, beautiful photography and packaging, things that a print magazine can do well that’s difficult to do online.” Editorial will include 7,000 to 8,000-word narratives in each issue. “This magazine has a tradition of winning National Magazine Awards for feature stories and our aim is to do that kind of journalism in every issue,” says Flax. “We don’t just want to be the biggest cycling magazine, we want to be as good as any title in any space.” Freelance edit and photography budgets are up 30 percent to 40 percent, according to Flax. “Anybody in the business knows when you upgrade from 70-pound cover stock to 100-pound cover stock, you’re talking about a six-figure kind of investment,” he says. “This is a real investment for a brand like ours and puts us in position to work regularly with photographers who before may have been out of our reach to do page after page, issue after issue. It’s one thing to reposition a magazine, it’s another thing to have the resources to execute it.” Market ResponseWhile ad pages in Bicycling dropped 6.5 percent in the first quarter of 2011, according to Publishers Information Bureau, the magazine rebounded in the second quarter with pages up 6 percent in April and 23 percent in May, according to the publisher. For the June redesign issue, ad pages are up 26 percent. While the publisher says endemic pages are up 18 percent, auto advertising is up 107 percent this year. “We’ve been floating out images in advance of the June issue and the acceptance has been fantastic,” says publisher Chris Lambiase. “We’re doing this at a time of strength–participation in the sport continues to grow.”The Bicycling audience has household income of $84,000 with a high percent of readers with professional/managerial job titles, according to Lambiase. “Redesigning Bicycling to be more sophisticated and visual allows us to better match the interests of our current audience, and to bring in new readers that are attracted by that aesthetic.”last_img read more

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WilmingtonTewksbury Chamber Of Commerce Helps Raise Funds For NuPath By Networking With

first_imgWOBURN, MA — The Woburn Business Association, Reading/North Reading Chamber, Wilmington/Tewksbury and Stoneham Chambers recently gathered at Boston Appliance for a Young Professionals networking event. Host and President, Christian Jason graciously entertained over 70 guests in their impressive showroom with a Food Network chef, networking Bingo and amazing raffle prizes.In addition to enjoying a great night of networking, attendees also supported a great cause. NuPath is a Woburn-based non-profit human services agency that helps adults with disabilities lead fulfilling lives in their communities. One of the services that NuPath provides is job training and support. Boston Appliance as well as many other businesses in the area have hired through NuPath and found engaged and enthusiastic employees. Attendees donated $400 to support the important work of NuPath.(NOTE: The above announcement and photo is from the Wilmington-Tewksbury Chamber of Commerce.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington-Tewksbury Chamber Of Commerce Invites Local Business Owners To Woburn Networking EventIn “Business”Wilmington-Tewksbury Chamber Of Commerce To Co-Host ‘Women In Business’ Event On July 22In “Business”Massachusetts Lottery Eyeing Wilmington As Location For New Regional OfficeIn “Business”last_img read more

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Google Assistant now speaks 27 languages

first_img See it 7 Photos The first 5 things to do with a new Google Home speaker Apple Google Pixel Buds 2 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. An Interpreter mode on phones has the potential to make the experience even more natural and free-ranging, enabling the discussion to take more spontaneous twists and turns.   That’s the dream. But, of course, there’s reality. And reality hasn’t always been kind to Google when it comes to next-gen translation efforts. Two years ago when Google unveiled its Pixel Buds wireless headphones, it also announced a live translation feature. The tool worked fine in demos, but didn’t impress reviewers. CNET editor David Carnoy said in his review that “the best thing about Google’s Pixel Buds is their case.” If Google brings Interpreter mode to phones, it won’t be the first company to create a translation device. Developers including Dosmono and China’s Sogou already make them. But if Google’s version can pull off all the nuances of live translation, it could help scale the technology immensely: After all, almost nine out of every 10 smartphones shipped in the world run Google’s Android software. “Android’s scale is really interesting because it’s distributed in places where so many people speak multiple languages,” said Vincent Lacey, a product manager for the Assistant. “You can see that unlocks a lot of opportunities.”    CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show. CES schedule: It’s six days of jam-packed events. Here’s what to expect. I don’t speak German. But at the concierge desk at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, I’m shooting the breeze with Phillip Klimke, a Google partnerships manager who’s speaking nothing but German at the moment. Our translator? Google Assistant.   It’s the latest trick for the Assistant, the search giant’s digital helper software that’s akin to Amazon’s Alexa and Apple’s Siri. On Tuesday at CES, the world’s largest technology show, Google unveiled the Assistant’s Interpreter mode, which aims to serve as a go-between for people who don’t speak the same language. Google is piloting the feature now at concierge desks at Caesars Palace (which is why we’re here for the demo), the Dream Downtown in New York City and the Hyatt in San Francisco. The feature will be available first in smart displays with the Google Assistant built in. That includes Google’s own Home Hub, a smart home device announced in October with a screen that shows you things like recipes and news updates. It also includes smart displays made by Google’s partners, including Lenovo, JBL and LG.  But Google wants to eventually bring it to other devices, including smartphones. Here’s how it works: Say, “Hey Google, be my Thai interpreter.” You’ll hear a beep and the Assistant will tell you to start speaking. After you say your next sentence in English, you’ll hear another beep, then the software recites the sentence in Thai. The translated text is also displayed on the screen. The tool works in 27 languages, including Spanish, Czech, Hindi and Vietnamese. “It’s very futuristic,” said Manuel Bronstein, vice president of product for the Assistant. “Our core focus is to make a product that can understand everything you say, can hear you, can convert those intents into actions and help you fulfill them.” Google is piloting the Assistant’s new Interpreter mode feature at the Caesars Palace concierge desk. James Martin/CNET The Assistant’s Interpreter mode is like using the Google translate app, but it’s meant to streamline the back and forth and make it feel more natural. The tool worked without a hitch during a demo Google planned with a Caesars Palace concierge. But when we tried it ourselves, there were some stumbles. Sometimes you can get lost in the sequence of beeps because you’ll want to rush into an answer, which throws off the timing of the software. Google said it’s still trying to figure out the best rhythm of conversations. I ask Klimke how he’s doing and what he likes to do in Vegas. I ask him who his favorite basketball player is. The Assistant spits out the questions in German. He replies, in German, that his favorite player is Dirk Nowitzki (naturally). The timing hitch aside, the Assistant handled all the translation questions from the CNET team pretty well: Where is the nearest bathroom? Does what happens in Vegas really stay in Vegas? Where can I find the best Elvis impersonator? You know, the important stuff.   CES or bust The new translation tool is the centerpiece announcement in Google’s elaborate showing at CES, the largest trade show in the world. For the second straight year, the search giant is going over the top in a town already known for over-the-top spectacles. In 2019, Google’s outdone itself: Its presence at CES is three times larger than last year. A massive banner reading “Hey Google” hangs over the main entrance of the Las Vegas Convention Center, as if it has the venue’s naming rights. Google also set up an expansive playground and interactive ride in the parking lot outside the conference halls to showcase how the Assistant works with everything from TVs to washing machines. CES and Las Vegas are now the front lines in the war between Google and Amazon over smart home supremacy, and Google is still playing catch-up. Amazon’s Echo devices, powered by its popular Alexa software, dominate the smart speaker industry with 73 percent of the market. Google’s Home devices come in second with 24 percent, according to Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, though the research firm notes that Google is “making strides.” Now playing: Watch this: Even though Duplex remains controversial, it’s those kinds of projects that could set Google’s Assistant apart from its rivals. And that includes projects like Interpreter mode. A live translation tool, especially on the smartphones almost everyone now carries around with them, has profound implications on how we interact with each other. I know it firsthand, from an extreme situation. In 2016, CNET sent a team to Greece to write about what impact, if any, technology was having on the global refugee crisis. When Syrians left home, they traveled first to Turkey, then the Greek isle of Lesvos, the nearest gateway to Europe. As we visited refugee camps, we met migrants from Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, Morocco and several other places. Many spoke English, but many did not. When they didn’t, we passed our smartphones back and forth using Google Translate to communicate, like a digital talking stick. One memorable conversation I had was with a then-15-year-old Syrian boy I met in Athens. He spoke sparse English, but from our app-assistant chat I was able to learn that he arrived in Greece on a boat with 15 other families, that he plays a card game called Trex to pass the time, and that he loves to sing. His plan was to be the next Justin Bieber. 3:59 $159 Best Buy CES 2019 CNET Smart Home Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Review • Pixel Buds review: Wireless headphones for a niche audience Share your voice Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 See It Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Last week, Amazon announced that more than 100 million Alexa devices have been sold. Not to be outdone, Google on Monday said the Assistant, first released in 2016, is expected to be built into on 1 billion devices by the end of the month, up from 500 million last May. While the chasm between Google and Amazon seems huge, the figures don’t really tell us a lot about how much people actually want the Google Assistant in their homes, since Android phones now already come with the software installed by default. To gain ground in smart home devices, the company on Tuesday also unveiled Google Assistant Connect, a platform that lets third-party hardware makers more easily integrate the Assistant into their gadgets. Now device makers will be able to use tools provided by Google in their products that pairs with a nearby Google Home. The tech acts as a bridge, sending the Home’s smarts to the outside devices. bed-sidetable-marble-white-weatherGoogle and Lenovo showed off a smart alarm clock. Lenovo Because all the computing is done by the Home device, the data stays with Google, Bronstein said. The company said it’s still figuring out what terms it will have set up with device makes. Those decisions will be important as Google, Facebook and other Silicon Valley companies face intense scrutiny not only for their own data collection practices, but for their abilities to keep that data safe from outsiders. Google also highlighted the range of what Assistant-enabled devices could be. The company on Tuesday announced an $80 smart clock made by Lenovo, a smaller version of the Home Hub that’s meant to look unobtrusive on a nightstand. It’s similar to the Amazon Echo Spot, which the e-commerce giant announced two years ago. Other new Assistant devices include a car phone adapter made by Anker Roav that plugs into a cigarette lighter and a Whirlpool KitchenAid smart display. “They are going to use this show as a demonstration of strength in diversity,” said Brian Solis, an analyst at the Altimeter Group. “Devices are only going to become more connected.” Potentially profound The biggest challenge for Google’s Assistant may be getting everyone to stop comparing it to Amazon’s Alexa. That’s easier said than done, given the comparisons are merited: You can use both to control your thermostat or lock your door. But even though it wants to own the home automation market, Google is working to lure consumers to the Assistant by proving it can do more that just tell you the day’s headlines. So Google is banking on its 20 years of experience as the world’s most advanced search engine, as well as its position as an artificial intelligence powerhouse, to build an assistant that aims to be more intelligent than the competition. “At the beginning, it’s going to be basic things like, ‘Hey Google, play music,’ and ‘Turn on this light,'” Bronstein said. “But as you see with translation and so forth, I think the complexity of the tasks the Assistant is going to be able to handle will increase. And it’s going to help you do things you weren’t able to do before.” Those things include having a robot make a phone call on your behalf. That’s what Google did in May with new Assistant technology called Duplex that ended up generating as much controversy as buzz for CEO Sundar Pichai. Duplex is a jaw-dropping, realistic-sounding AI that mimics human speech. The software uses verbal tics like “uh” and “um,” and pauses while talking, as if thinking of what it’s going to say next, even though its responses are preprogrammed. The point of Duplex is to enable the Google Assistant to make restaurant reservations and hair appointments for you. But almost immediately, industry watchers, AI ethicists and consumers were worried about the software’s ability to deceive the people it was talking to. Google later said it would build in disclosures that those calls were automated. It’s going to help you do things you weren’t able to do before. Manuel Bronstein, vice president of product for the Assistant $159 Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Lenovo Smart Clock tailors Google Assistant for your nightstand See All Tags reading • Google Assistant adds interpreter mode as war with Amazon Alexa heats up Comments Mentioned Above Google Pixel Buds (Just Black) • Smart Home Mobile Google Assistant Amazon Google Lenovo LG Apple Alphabet Inc. Whirlpoollast_img read more

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Privacy experts Focus on controlling damage caused by data collection

first_img Comment 1 Share your voice You’re not going to stop the collection of your personal information. That’s the bad news. Companies and governments are finding more points of data to harvest about your daily life, and they’re going to keep doing it.Despite that, a group of privacy experts from organizations including the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the American Civil Liberties Union said there’s hope. Speaking at the Oktane19 conference in San Francisco on Wednesday, they called for a change in tactics: advocate for better laws and technologies that keep data collection from hurting you.”We probably are unable to stop the amount of collection in an effective manner,” said Kurt Opsahl, deputy executive director and general counsel at the EFF. “The answer is to use tools so that creates less harm.”One of these tools could be regulation that gives consumers more rights over their data, like the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation. The law counters the trend of companies collecting whatever data they want on you and storing it indefinitely, because it puts them at risk of financial penalties if hackers steal the data or if it’s misused, said Jon Callas, senior technology fellow at the ACLU. Security Data privacycenter_img Tags It also means thinking about the unexpected ways data from long ago, which Callas calls “data sludge,” could be used against you.Marc Rogers, an executive director focused on cybersecurity at Okta, the event’s sponsor, agreed. For example, he said, connected cars like the Tesla collect information about drivers’ movements for the entire life of the car. What happens to that data if the car goes to the junkyard or auction house, he asked.”If you told me years ago I’d be living in a world where I’d have to be careful disposing of my light bulb because it contains my Wi-Fi password, I’d have thought you were crazy,” Rogers said. The answer to this problem could be technological, with product makers coming up with ways to limit the data exposed at the end of a device’s life cycle.Technical fixes to other problems are emerging but need to become more widespread, said Sara-Jayne Terp, a data scientist who focuses on stopping coordinated misinformation campaigns. As an example of a success, she cited the campaign of Emmanuel Macron for blocking the efforts of hackers and trolls before France’s presidential election in 2017.”We’re not all doomed,” she said. “We just have a lot of work to do.” These Android apps have been tracking you, even when you say stop The majority of scooters in LA are going to share your location with the city Hacking Privacylast_img read more

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Laws to prevent violence against women not implemented

first_imgProthom Alo organizes a discussion on ‘Strict measures needed to prevent violence against women’ at its Kawran Bazar office on Saturday. Photo: Prothom AloDiscussants at a roundtable on Saturday said the violence against women was worsening by the day.Although there are laws to prevent violence against women, the participants of the Prothom Alo roundtable pointed out, these are not implemented properly.Prothom Alo, in association with the Institute of Informatics and Development, organised the discussion on ‘Strict measures needed to prevent violence against women’ at its Kawran Bazar office. Prothom Alo associate editor Abdul Quayum moderated the discussion.  Bangladesh Mahila Parishad general secretary Maleka Banu said there had been movements over four decades to prevent violence against women.“There are many laws to prevent violence against women but these are not implemented. Women are becoming more vulnerable,” she said.Supreme Court lawyer Sara Hossain said the state is not human rights friendly.She said there are court orders regarding violence against women in the streets.These orders are not followed, Sara Hossain said, also pointing to the major problems in the implementation of the laws.She said the police are bound to record complaints, but frequently refuse to do so. No action is taken against the law enforcers, she added.Also a human rights activist, Sara Hossain said two female activists of United People’s Democratic Front were reportedly abducted. No steps were taken in this regard, she said.Sara said the scope to protest against violation of human rights is shrinking.Laws are being applied in the interests of the party in power, she alleged.Public prosecutor of Women and Children Repression Prevention Tribunal 5 Ali Asgar Swapan said the Women and Children Repression Prevention Act-2000 was passed in 18 years ago. The law is not properly applied, he said.  Swapan said there is a provision that the trial proceedings have to be completed within 180 days, but this is not followed.Chairman at the women and gender studies department of Dhaka University Syed Md Shaikh Imtiaz said they were working on the repression on women in Gangachhara upazila of Rangpur.He quoted certain male students as saying that it was inevitable that girl students were raped if they dressed ‘indecently’. “We have turned our religious leaders into social leaders,” Imtiaz regretted.The first woman dean of the social science faculty at Dhaka University, Sadeka Halim, said the root cause of violence against women was yet to be identified.“If any teacher sexually harasses a female teacher or student, we can’t take exemplary action against them due to old proctorial rules. We can only send the accused on forced leave,” she said.UNFPA national programme officer for gender, adolescent and youth, Humaira Farhanaz said the government was working to stop child marriage and some upazila nirbahi officers (UNOs) were active in their efforts to free their administrative units of child marriage.“But there is information from different areas that families were getting their children married off in microbuses and boats,” said Humaira Farhanaz.IID chief executive officer Sayeed Ahmed, IID associate researcher Falguni Reza, Md Nurul Islam of Asia Foundation and Samia Haque of Brac University, among others, spoke at the roundtable.last_img read more

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Church World Service hosts Ration Challenge around World Refugee Day

first_imgEmily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 News Share This! Survey: Most white evangelicals blame journalists for fake news Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email News • Photos of the Week Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,New video captures sexist comments to women ministers — read by male counterparts Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — The Rev. Trina Bose North didn’t have a lot of ingredients to work with for a recent dinner party: lentils, chickpeas, rice, flour, a couple of spices and some sugar.But things turned out all right. She and her guests made garlicky flatbread, lentils on rice and chickpeas fixed two ways.There was even dessert.Her foodie husband borrowed a tip from some vegan friends and combined the sugar with leftover water from the chickpeas to make meringue cookies.The meal might not make it onto Pinterest or the pages of “Martha Stewart Living,” but it was filling, said Bose North, pastor of Crown Heights United Methodist Church in Oklahoma City.Bose North and her friends are among more than 14,000 Americans participating in the Ration Challenge for the first time this year — many, this week around World Refugee Day (June 20).The Rev. Trina Bose North, right, talks with refugee congregants about their experiences at Crown Heights United Methodist Church in Oklahoma City on June 2, 2019. Photo courtesy of Trina Bose NorthThe global challenge — organized in the United States by Church World Service — asks participants to live for a week on the same food rations people receive at refugee camps. The idea is to raise awareness for the challenges refugees face and funds to support them. Participants ask friends and others to sponsor them by donating to the cause.It also is a way to show support for refugees at a time when the U.S. refugee program is struggling. President Trump has set refugee admissions to the country at historic lows, said Mary Elizabeth Margolis, director of communications for the Immigration and Refugee Program at CWS.Many people feel there isn’t much they can do to help, Margolis said. This is one thing they can do.“It’s a way to show support in your communities and to start conversations and also to really make a difference by raising a couple of hundred dollars,” Margolis said. “If we all do that, it can have a huge impact.”The Ration Challenge began in 2014 when co-founders Kaz McGrath and Ben Littlejohn visited a refugee camp on the Thai-Myanmar border through their work for Act for Peace, the international aid agency of the National Council of Churches in Australia. There, McGrath and Littlejohn met with refugees and saw the sparse rations they receive.Sample contents of a Ration Challenge refugee box. Photo courtesy of Ration ChallengeFor a week, they decided to live on the same food to better understand the experience of living in a refugee camp.Since then, more than 40,000 people in Australia and New Zealand have joined Act for Peace’s annual Ration Challenge, raising more than $7 million to support refugees.CWS — one of nine agencies authorized to resettle refugees in the U.S. — was anticipating as many as 8,000 Americans might sign up for the challenge in its first year stateside, according to Margolis. Already, more than 14,000 have signed up from all 50 states, donating more than $264,000 as of Monday (June 17).About $2 million has been raised so far this year by the challenge.So many Americans registered to take part that CWS ran out of ration packs to send participants. The organization posted a list of what’s included in the challenge online so others can do it on their own.The packs for the challenge include the same rations received by a Syrian refugee living in a camp in Jordan: small bags of rice, chickpeas and lentils; a tin of sardines; flour; a can of beans; and a bottle of oil.Participants can earn additional ingredients for their meals by raising money for CWS and sharing about the challenge.The Syrian conflict, which started in March 2011, has led to hundreds of thousands of Syrians fleeing their country. The situation escalated in 2013 and again in 2015. It is estimated that over 1 million Syrian refugees have now fled to Jordan. Photo courtesy of Ration ChallengeThe funds raised by the Ration Challenge will provide food rations, medicine and education for Syrian refugees in Jordan.CWS also is among a number of faith-based organizations advocating on Capitol Hill for specific measures to help refugees.That includes the Grace Act, which would set the minimum number of refugees admitted to the U.S. each year at its historic average of 95,000. Current U.S. law allows the president to set the limit on how many refugees are admitted. Trump has set that number at just 30,000 for the current fiscal year, which ends in October.CWS also supports the No Ban Act, Margolis said, which would repeal and prevent efforts to ban Muslims, refugees and asylum-seekers from entering the country.“There’s a strong sense among the communities where we work that we have a responsibility to do something to respond to that and that protecting families is a fundamental value regardless of where those people come from or what their religious affiliation is,” Margolis said.Melanie Smith, left, and the Rev. Trina Bose North show off their flatbread-making abilities while participating in the Ration Challenge in Oklahoma City. Photo courtesy of Trina Bose NorthAt Crown Heights United Methodist Church, a team of coaches for the Ration Challenge has set up a temporary office and reaches out to participants throughout the week with tips and encouragement.Bose North spoke during a recent service at the church about her experience taking the challenge. Members of several refugee families who attend Crown Heights shared their stories as well.For the pastor, taking the Ration Challenge is one small way she can live out her Christian beliefs.“The call on all of us is to serve the least and the lonely among us, and refugees are some of the world’s neglected and forgotten people. To raise awareness, to provide help for refugees is absolutely what I’m called to do as Christian,” Bose North said.The challenge forced her to think of others’ experiences — so drastically unlike her own — in a way that was different from reading about the refugee crisis or seeing images in the news, she said.“You can read it, and that gets into your head, and you can write a check, and that affects you on a different level, but, man, to really experience it,” she said. “There’s something to be said about the experiential piece of this.” TagsChurch World Service CWS homepage featured Ration Challenge refugees World Refugee Day,You may also likecenter_img As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Catholicism By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Share This! Emily McFarlan Miller Emily McFarlan Miller is a national reporter for RNS based in Chicago. She covers evangelical and mainline Protestant Christianity.,Add Comment Click here to post a comment Share This! Share This! Share This! By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Emaillast_img read more

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