Faculty Authors Q&A

first_imgFaculty BiosAimee Bender is a professor of English in the Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences. Her latest book is The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake.Felix Gutierrez is a professor of journalism and communication in the USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism and a professor of American studies and ethnicities in Dornsife. His latest co-authored book is Racism, Sexism, and the Media: The Rise of Class Communication in Multicultural America. Oliver Mayer is an associate professor of dramatic writing at the USC School of Theatre. His latest play is Fortune is a Woman.Mike Gruntman is a professor of astronautics in the Viterbi School of Engineering.T.C. Boyle is a Distinguished Professor of English in USC Dornsife. His latest book is When the Killing’s Done.Mike Gruntman is a professor of astronautics in the Viterbi School of Engineering. His latest book is Enemy Amongst Trojans: A Soviet Spy at USC.Susan Estrich is the Robert Kingsley Professor of Law and Political Science at the Gould School of Law. Her most recent book is The Case for Hillary Clinton.Do you ever feel like teaching gets in the way of your writing/research or vice versa?AIMEE BENDER: The balance is tricky. Reading time gets scarce, and summer is crucial that way. I write in the mornings, which helps, because by the time I’m teaching, that part of my day has already happened.FELIX GUTIERREZ: I think writing informs my teaching. It keeps me rethinking. The students are very helpful, [their] generation gives newer insights. I think my writing is better because I am teaching.OLIVER MAYER: Teaching informs and fuels my writing research. Interacting with young people keeps me young. But occasionally I have something burning in me that I can’t wait to write at the same time that I’m grading or teaching or prepping for a class. When that happens, I try to take a deep breath and try not to get frustrated. The truth is there is time for everything to get done, teaching and writing, even when it doesn’t feel like it.Where do you do your writing?T.C. BOYLE: Both at home and in a place I rent in the Sequoia National Forest. When I’m in the Sequoias I get more writing and reading done than I do down here in Santa Barbara, simply because of the boredom factor. I find that crushing boredom is highly productive.MIKE GRUNTMAN: All writing I can only do at home because when I get to campus, my door is open and students come in nonstop with all kinds of issues, problems, challenges, requests. Staying at home helps to concentrate. On campus, it’s practically impossible.MAYER: I like to write in my office on campus. I play my music and work on several things at the same time — a new play, a report for the provost, notes for a writing student — and I like to keep the door open. I actually don’t mind being interrupted. It’s fun to hear other people working and laughing, students, staff, and other faculty. Sometime it finds its way into my work.Aimee Bender is a professor of English in the Dornsife College of Letters, Arts & SciencesAre other faculty members involved in your writing process?BENDER: Not in the process, no. But it is nice when we touch base about what we’re working on. A sense of community helps with writers, or at least it helps me.GUTIERREZ: I’ve done five books, all of them have been co-authored. Everyone has their own style. We sketch out the book as to what you want it to be, and then we divide the chapters and then we read each other’s chapters. You’re not all trying to write a sentence at the same time. You have to have respect for the person you’re working with.MAYER: Although I write alone, I have several wonderful friends and collaborators on campus, most recently my colleague Angus Fletcher. … There are so many brilliant people on campus that it’s only natural to work together in one way or another.Where do you find inspiration?GUTIERREZ: There’s a curiosity that I think any journalist has, wondering ‘what if,’ ‘how come,’ ‘if I looked here, what would I find,’ and so a lot of it is driven by your own interests and looking for stories in places where people may have not seen them or found them before. … It takes a lot of digging.GRUNTMAN: I always use the first lecture [of my classes] to talk about historical developments of rocketry, and I realized there are no books that would serve engineering or scientist audiences. The books [in existence] were either popular, so they had very little technical information, or they were narrow books that were just too narrow. Nothing existed that was technical enough but also very broad so I decided I wanted this book, and I heard from other colleagues that they wanted a book like this.Oliver Mayer is an associate professor of dramatic writing at the USC School of Theatre.MAYER: It’s great to live in L.A. because there are so many stories all around us occurring every day; it’s pretty impossible to run out of ideas. I believe that the best writing asks big questions, sometimes unanswerable questions, and that in trying to answer them we can do our best stuff. I also think the injustice spurs good writing; sadly, there’s a lot of injustice.SUSAN ESTRICH: Everywhere and nowhere. And often, not quickly enough. Mostly they come from reading and thinking and not thinking.What’s the hardest part of the writing and publishing processes?BOYLE: The middle of any book. The middle is where you hit the wall. Touring is tough too, simply because you must address the horrors of the airline industry and eat hotel food. Take any reasonably healthy man or woman, expose him or her to hotel dining for a week, and death will rapidly ensue.GRUNTMAN: It takes time. We have only 24 hours in a day, and a lot of other competing demands. I work in a highly competitive field in which it’s very difficult to get grants and contacts. It takes a lot ofSusan Estrich is the Robert Kingsley Professor of Law and Political Science at the Gould School of Law.effort. We also want to provide our students the best education programs. The little amount of time that remains goes into writing, so if I have more time, I have two or three books on the back burner in various stages. It may take a couple or years or it may take forever — it’s all a matter of time.ESTRICH: Book tours.Do you have any idiosyncratic writing habits?BOYLE: Not at all. I simply bleed a chicken into a dishpan, immerse my feet and begin typing. When the blood goes cold, I stop writing.BENDER: I write for two hours in the morning, often to the minute. Because I’m ready to stop! And I think routine has value here.MAYER: I have toys on my office desk that I like to play with when I’m stuck. I also like to have my dog Don Aldo in the office when I’m writing; he’s an amazing companion.last_img read more

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What we learned from Syracuse football’s loss to N.C. State

first_imgSyracuse (4-6, 2-4 Atlantic Coast) struggled in its 35-20 loss to North Carolina State (5-5, 2-4), and made the last two games of its regular season must-wins to guarantee itself a bowl appearance. SU has its home finale against Florida State and its season finale at Pittsburgh still left.Check out what we learned from the loss to N.C. State.Alvin Cornelius can step up in Steve Ishmael’s placeAlvin Cornelius’ teammates refer to him as “Ace” and on Saturday, he filled the spot Steve Ishamel had vacated admirably. Although Ishmael wasn’t included on this week’s injury report, the wide receiver sat out Saturday’s game.“He was still a little banged up from the Clemson game. He practiced during the week and through it early in the week and as the week went, he just didn’t recover,” Syracuse head coach Dino Babers said. “He practiced on Tuesday, but then Wednesday didn’t recover well, Thursday didn’t recover well, and he just didn’t feel good about it so we went with Ace.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textCornelius tied Ervin Philips and Amba Etta-Tawo for the most passes caught by an SU receiver in the game with four and the senior tallied 61 yards. His best play was a 46-yard reception. Cornelius beat the cornerback deep and starting quarterback Zack Mahoney arced the ball into the wide receiver’s hands.“I think him on one of their DBs,” Mahoney said. “We liked that matchup.”Jessica Sheldon | Photo EditorChop block costs Syracuse at chance to tie gameSyracuse was driving with under 10 minutes to play and Mahoney nearly had another deep throw to Cornelius. Mahoney placed the ball in the back of the end zone and Cornelius came down with the 34-yard toss. But the referees had thrown flags in the backfield. After a short discussion, they called a chop block on backup center Donnie Foster, who had replaced Colin Byrne after the starting center left the game with an injury, and Dontae Strickland. An N.C. State pass rusher had beaten Foster and Strickland dove low as Foster pushed the defensive lineman.Pending a two-point conversion, the nullified touchdown could have tied Syracuse and North Carolina State. Instead, Mahoney was sacked on the next play, setting up a second-and-38. Somehow, the down marker was changed to a down later than it should have been. After an incompletion on second down, SU punted because the down marker read fourth and 38.MORE COVERAGE:Syracuse down to its last strike after loss against N.C. StateEric Dungey ‘probably doubtful’ against Florida StateGallery: The best photos from SU-NCSU “They did not (give an explanation). I’m not clear on all the stuff that went through right there. I was politely asked to leave the field so I obliged,” Babers clarified later.Strickland said he was just doing his job and what he was “taught to do” in picking up the extra defensive lineman when he came through.“There were a lot of critical calls that didn’t go our way, that’s part of the game. We won’t cry over spilled milk,” Babers said.“Those big fines, I can’t afford them. Those other guys can afford them. They called a chop block. The center got beat very quickly, the third-team center got beat very quickly and anytime that happens, the back’s got to compensate,” Babers added. “The back did a fantastic job of compensating and the official said that the center that got beat very badly put his hands back on the guy who was being blocked by our running back.” Published on November 13, 2016 at 2:00 pm Contact Chris: cjlibona@syr.edu | @ChrisLibonati Special teams’ effort wasted by offenseAfter struggling in the middle of the season, Syracuse punter Sterling Hofrichter has been stellar for SU down the stretch of the season. The Orange needed Hofricter six times on Saturday. The punter racked up 284 total yards and an average of 47.3 yards per punt. His longest flew 65 yards and he put two inside the 20-yard line.In addition to Hofricther’s punts, kick returner and wide receiver Sean Riley blocked a North Carolina State punt inside its own 20-yard line. Before SU had recovered, Riley started celebrating, jumped up and looked back toward the sideline. He and Shyheim Cullen brought extra pressure. SU began the ensuing possession on NCSU’s 17-yard line but came away with only a field goal.Although SU’s special teams proved to be solid on Saturday, Syracuse wasted the field position wins it did accrue. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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ARRIVEDERCI BAMBINI! FREE PIZZA FOR COLLEGE KIDS ON LAST DAY IN TOWN

first_imgA PIZZA takeaway said ‘Arrivederci’ to children at a town school on their last day.Pupils from Coláiste Ailigh in Letterkenny have been regular customers of Pat’s Pizza on Main Street for many years.But the students move tomorrow and Friday to their brand new school – too far away for lunchtime trade. So Pat’s Pizza gave away free pizzas to pupils on Wednesday as well as free bars of chocolate.The pupils however returned the favour.Many of them left tips for the staff.The new school on a 8.5-acre Carnamuggagh site includes a library, outdoor teaching areas, an art room, rooms for woodwork and technical graphics, a music and drama room, science rooms, a special needs room, a computer suite, kitchenette, fitness centre, GAA and soccer pitches, basketball and tennis courts and a gymnasium that can also be used for school events. Pupils missing Mac’s Mace opposite the old location at a cramped Sprackburn House needn’t worry.Mac’s has won the catering contract for the new school which now has 245 pupils.The new school has room for 100 more pupils as it continues to expand.Micheál Ó Giobúin, school principal, said: “The new school is no more than the children and staff deserve.” ARRIVEDERCI BAMBINI! FREE PIZZA FOR COLLEGE KIDS ON LAST DAY IN TOWN was last modified: November 13th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Colaiste AilighletterkennyMicheál Ó GiobúinPat’s Pizzalast_img read more

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