Silver expects NBA players to stand during national anthem

first_imgGervacio mends fences with Suzara as she returns to Foton in PSL Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Silver said the playing of the national anthem has always been a time for respect and reflection — even in a league where 25 percent of the players are not American — and recalled that many teams locked arms last season.He wants them to continue showing unity during the anthem — but to do it while standing.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smog“It’s been a rule as long as I’ve been involved with the league, and my expectation is that our players will continue to stand for the anthem,” he said.Silver didn’t say what would happen if any players refuse to stand, adding: “If that were to happen, we’ll deal with it when it happens.” “I felt it was corrosive to this league,” he said.The second-worst team has a 19.9 percent to win the lottery and the third seed a 15.6 percent chance under the current format that will remain through next June’s draft.The board voted to allow Silver to fine teams who violate the league’s new guidelines about resting players. Teams can’t sit healthy players for high-profile, nationally televised games, and fines for violating that can be for at least $100,000.The rules also say that unless there are unusual circumstances, teams should not rest multiple healthy players for the same game or rest healthy players when playing on the road.The league office had long resisted getting involved in coaches’ decisions about resting players. But with its national TV partners paying the league billions, Silver felt he had to act after LeBron James and stars from the Golden State Warriors sat out nationally televised games last season.“It’s not a position we want the league to be in,” Silver said. “It ultimately is my hope that the rules go in the drawer and that teams step up here and see that there is a larger obligation to our fans, to the basketball community.”The board also talked about current events, meeting less than a week after President Donald Trump opted against inviting the Warriors to the White House after All-Star Stephen Curry said he didn’t want to go.Trump had criticized NFL players for their anthem protests in a speech the night before, and hundreds responded in games Sunday and Monday by kneeling during the anthem.Silver thinks NBA players have other opportunities, either by continuing their community service efforts or through the media, to make their voices heard.“I’m hoping once again that this league can play a constructive role there,” Silver said. He spoke following the NBA’s Board of Governors meetings, during which owners passed rules designed to prevent healthy players from sitting out games, and teams from losing games on purpose to improve their draft position.Under the new draft lottery rules, the teams with the three worst records will all have 14 percent odds to land the No. 1 pick when the changes are implemented with the 2019 draft.The team with the worst record previously had 25 percent odds to win the lottery and could fall to the No. 4 spot in the draft. Now that team call tumble all the way to fifth.The lottery changes were to discourage tanking, the practice of losing games on purpose in an effort to improve draft odds. The Philadelphia 76ers relied on the tactic heavily in recent years and the league felt it needed to step in and urge teams to always be competitive.Silver felt teams had even begun feeling pressure to use the strategy of fielding poor squads and building through the draft.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson LATEST STORIES DAY6 is for everybody Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Mos Burger to open in Manila; teases with a pop-upcenter_img View comments NBA Commissioner Adam Silver speaks during a news conference, Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017 in New York. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)NEW YORK — Adam Silver expects NBA players to continue standing for the national anthem.Not only because it’s a league rule, but because they are aware of what it means in what the commissioner believes is a divided America.“Many of our players have spoken out already about their plan to stand for the anthem,” Silver said Thursday. “And I think they understand how divisive an issue it is in our society right now.”ADVERTISEMENT How to help the Taal evacuees In ‘Jojo Rabbit,’ Comedy and Drama Collide Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Redemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie Thompson OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson MOST READlast_img read more

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Harnessing Analytics to Keep Children Safe

first_imgShare15TweetShare2Email17 SharesOctober 6, 2015; Boston GlobeThe state has a public contract to safeguard the well-being of all citizens, especially the vulnerable. But fulfilling this contract is difficult given an overwhelmed system that has to deal with overlapping issues of poverty, mental health, income and ethnicity. NPQ has reported many times on the shortcomings of the national child welfare system, the enforcement of child welfare laws, and even the controversial practice of rehoming.Around the world, child welfare authorities come under the gun to solve the guessing game of who to save, especially when tragic negligence hits the media. One example is the 2012 UK case of Daniel Pelka, who died from starvation and abuse even though authorities had contact with the family multiple times. In the U.S., a similar trend of “missing deadly patterns” has been documented by the Austin American-Statesman. A striking case here is Christopher Berry, deemed “lower risk” by social workers despite a history of arrests and violence, who went on to shake his son to death.In the Pelka case, the social care department stated that it couldn’t rule out a similar event happening again in the future because “social care is not a science. All we can do is be clear about our requirements and ensure professionals are properly supported.” However, in the past couple of years, authorities and nonprofits in the U.S. have been using the science of predictive analysis to save abused children.Hillsborough County, Florida, saw a dramatic improvement after the launch of their analytics system in January 2013, as no children have died from abuse since that time. “We’ve been able to narrow down which cases are high risk, and stop doing cookie-cutter supervision,” said Paul Penhale, a case management supervisor at Gulf Coast Jewish Family & Community Services.But detractors say that predictive analytics is just another way for Big Brother to interfere in people’s lives. The data may be wrong and single out families for harassment. “It scares the bejeezus out of me,” said Witold Walczak, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania. “That should scare anybody. It’s like putting a name into a machine and making a determination about whether that person can have their child or not.”While these fears are valid, nonprofits are showing positive outcomes. For example, the Child Welfare and Policy Practice Group (CWG) lent support to an analytics project for the Florida Abuse Hotline. “Our research showed the tremendous positive effect of a visit from a caseworker,” said analytics expert Albert Blackmon. “But child protective services agencies across the country are overburdened. Analytics can help caseworkers identify the most at-risk kids as well as pinpoint the services that can lead to the most positive outcomes.”The National Council on Crime and Delinquency (NCCD) works with agencies and jurisdictions on predictive analytics for child welfare. During an NCCD webinar on October 8th, Chief Program Officer Jesse Russell, PhD, gave examples of how predictive analytics improves services, specifically in the child welfare to juvenile justice crossover, hotline screening analysis, and the commercial sexual exploitation of children. He sees predictive analytics simply as a learning tool and “a way of looking at past experiences and how they might apply to the future.”In response to a question about false positives, Dr. Russell said that “although these are innocuous when, say, Netflix predicts the wrong movie a person will like, they are obviously less so in interventions with families. If an agency is already intervening, analytics can help their decision. The idea isn’t to rely on analytics alone but to ask how we can engage lots of stakeholders in the community. What are our values and how are we responding to families? What are our responses, and how invasive should we be?”“More data is better,” Dr. Russell went on to explain. “The biggest question is not the amount of data but the diversity of data, not just information on the child or family. Diversity makes the data as powerful as possible.”Although mounds of data sound scary, the image of an all-knowing and infallible “Person of Interest” machine that spits out names is not the reality. A lack of data is actually a much scarier proposition. Without more data, overwhelmed case workers are more likely to make snap judgments based on their own biases and assumptions, and more children will be at risk of dying.—Amy ButcherShare15TweetShare2Email17 Shareslast_img read more

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