Martin Keown speaks out on William Saliba ‘mystery’ as Arsenal make U-turn over loan deal

first_img Comment Martin Keown speaks out on William Saliba ‘mystery’ as Arsenal make U-turn over loan deal William Saliba looks set to remain with Arsenal this season (Picture: Getty)Martin Keown has questioned Arsenal’s ‘bizarre’ handling of William Saliba since the club signed the defender from Saint-Etienne and admits the situation has left him puzzled.The Gunners landed Saliba back in July 2019 for a fee of around £27million before immediately loaning the Frenchman back to Saint-Etienne for the 2019/20 campaign. Arsenal’s refusal to extend Saliba’s temporary agreement so he could participate in the Coupe de France final infuriated Saint-Etienne and the dispute has rumbled on over the summer, with the Ligue 1 outfit missing out on a second loan deal for the 19-year-old. Advertisement The Frenchman initially looked set for a second loan move away from Arsenal (Picture: Getty)Brentford also registered a strong interest in Saliba but Arsenal have reportedly had second thoughts about letting the youngster leave on loan and Mikel Arteta now intends to keep him with the first-team.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTSpeaking on talkSPORT, Keown urged Arsenal to loan Saliba to a Championship club if he’s not ready for Premier League football and admitted the whole situation had left him bewildered.‘It’s bizarre. We’ve just not seen the kid,’ the ex-Arsenal centre-half said ahead of Friday’s deadline.‘You want to see him to see how he performs say in the Championship to see if he’s good enough.center_img Advertisement Keown is bewildered by the situation surrounding young Arsenal defender Saliba (Picture: Getty)‘I’m anxious to see. The feeling was that this was going to be the one. ‘Gabriel has come in and been an outstanding signing.Should William Saliba be loaned out by Arsenal this season?Yes0%No0%1000+ votes so far…Share your resultsShare your resultsTweet your results‘Maybe they feel he’s too young and want him to go out to pastures new.‘To then loan him out when there was a real problem there last season seems a real mystery.’More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityThough Saliba has so far struggled to make an impact at Arsenal, Gabriel – who completed a £27m switch from Lille to north London – has had an impressive start to life in north London. The Brazilian defender was named Arsenal’s Player of the Month with 72 per cent of the vote for September.Alexandre Lacazette and Hector Bellerin came second and third in the vote.Follow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page.MORE: Thomas Partey drops Arsenal debut hint ahead of Manchester City clashMORE: ‘Dream come true’ – Arsenal striker Eddie Nketiah passes Alan Shearer and Francis Jeffers to become England U21’s record goalscorer Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 14 Oct 2020 10:13 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link7.5kShareslast_img read more

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Men Don’t Mother

first_imgWitherspoon Institute – Jenet Erickson – 26 Oct 2012There’s been a strange turn of opinions about fatherhood—at least in recent public debates. Decades of research have now documented the tremendous challenges children face when they grow up without their fathers. But you would never know it by looking at some of the recent public arguments for “genderless parenting.”So what do the decades of research on fathers say? Boys from fatherless families are twice as likely to end up in prison before age 30. Girls raised in homes without their fathers are much more likely to engage in early sexual behavior and end up pregnant as teenagers—for example, girls whose fathers left home before their daughters turned six are six times more likely to end up pregnant as teenagers. Children who grow up without married mothers and fathers are also more likely to experience depression, behavioral problems, and school expulsion.There is also more abuse in homes without fathers. In studies of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, fathers living with their children emerge as strong protectors—both through watching over their children’s activities and communicating to others that they will protect them. In one study, abuse was 10 times more likely for children in homes with their mother and an unrelated boyfriend.These differences can partly be explained by the fact that these children are more likely to grow up in poverty. But that too reveals the importance of dads, as married fathers are the primary breadwinners in almost 70% of married families—providing resources that benefit children in a whole host of ways.In spite of this evidence, some academics and voices that shape public opinion are asserting that fathers are not, in fact, essential. As two researchers recently argued in a top-tier family science publication, “The gender of parents only matters in ways that don’t matter.” Though it may be important to have two “parental figures,” their genders and relationship to the child don’t matter that much. Fathers—as well as mothers—are supposedly disposable when it comes to their own children’s development.Not surprisingly, arguments for “genderless parenting” are often based on a particular view of what defines male and female equality. Depending on the definition, one can do what the other can do, and do it just as well, if given the chance. Thus, mothers and fathers are interchangeable, and one or the other gender is unnecessary and replaceable.It’s easy to see why these claims seem believable. We all know mothers who are breadwinners, and fathers who perform the traditional female role of providing full-time quality child care. And a body of research shows that fathers have both the desire and capacity to be protective, nurturing, affectionate, and responsive with their children.But are fathers and mothers really the same? Do mothers “father” and do fathers “mother” in the same way the other would do?Canadian scholar, Andrea Doucet, has explored this question in her book Do Men Mother? Her extensive research with 118 male primary caregivers, including stay-at-home dads, led her to conclude that fathers do not “mother.” And that’s a good thing. Although mothering and fathering have much in common, there were persistent, critical differences that were important for children’s development.To begin, fathers more often used fun and playfulness to connect with their children. No doubt, many a mother has wondered why her husband can’t seem to help himself from “tickling and tossing” their infant—while she stands beside him holding her breath in fear. And he can’t understand why all she wants to do is “coo and cuddle.” Yet as Doucet found, playfulness and fun are often critical modes of connection with children—even from infancy.Fathers also more consistently made it a point to get their children outdoors to do physical activities with them. Almost intuitively they seemed to know that responding to the physical and developmental needs of their children was an important aspect of nurturing.When fathers responded to children’s emotional hurts, they differed from mothers in their focus on fixing the problem rather than addressing the hurt feeling. While this did not appear to be particularly “nurturing” at first, the seeming “indifference” was useful— particularly as children grew older. They would seek out and share things with their dads precisely because of their measured, problem-solving responses. The “indifference” actually became a strategic form of nurturing in emotionally-charged situations.Fathers were also more likely to encourage children’s risk taking—whether on the playground, in school work, or in trying new things. While mothers typically discouraged risk-taking, fathers guided their children in deciding how much risk to take and encouraged them in it. At the same time, fathers were more attuned to developing a child’s physical, emotional, and intellectual independence—in everything from children making their own lunches and tying their own shoes to doing household chores and making academic decisions.As she evaluated these differences, Doucet wondered if fathers just weren’t as “nurturing” as mothers. Their behaviors didn’t always fit the traditional definition of “holding close and sensitively responding.” But a key part of nurturing also includes the capacity to “let go.” It was this careful “letting-go” that fathers were particularly good at—in ways that mothers were often not.Her findings provide empirical evidence for the feelings described on Public Discourse by Robert Oscar Lopez in his recent account of growing up without the influence of his father. Lopez yearned for what kids in traditional families often take for granted—the opportunity to learn how to act, speak, and behave in ways that reflect the unique gender cues provided by the parenting of a father and a mother. Although Lopez would have appeared normal on most sociological indexes (as a well-trained, high achieving student), inside he felt confused. In his own words, he grew up “weird,” unable to relate to or understand either gender very well. And that made it hard to understand himself.Andrea Doucet ends her report by sharing an illuminating moment from her research. After a long evening discussing their experiences as single dads, Doucet asked a group of sole-custody fathers, “In an ideal world, what resources or supports would you like to see for single fathers?” She expected to hear that they wanted greater social support and societal acceptance, more programs and policies directed at single dads. Instead, after a period of awkward silence, one dad stood and said, “An ideal world would be one with a father and a mother. We’d be lying if we pretended that wasn’t true.” Nods of agreement followed with expressions of approval from the other dads. Although many had had bitter experiences of separation and divorce, they couldn’t help but acknowledge the inherent connectedness of mothering and fathering—and the profound deficit experienced when one or the other is not there.Arguments for the non-essential father may reflect an effort to accept the reality that many children today grow up without their dads. But surely a more effective and compassionate approach would be to acknowledge the unique contributions of both mothers and fathers in their children’s lives, and then do what we can to ensure that becomes a reality for more children.Jenet Erickson is an assistant professor in the School of Family Life at Brigham Young University.http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2012/10/6710/last_img read more

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“Dull Christmas for us” – rice farmers

first_imgOver 300 rice farmers in Region Two (Pomeroon-Supenaam) and from the island of Wakenaam in Region Three (Essequibo Islands-West Demerara) flocked the gate of the Hack Rice Mill in Golden Fleece, Essequibo Coast demanding their payments.Farmers are concerned over the long delay in receiving payment from millers for paddy purchased since September and some even earlier this year. After a commotion erupted in front of the main gate of the rice factory, its management was forced to meet with the frustrated rice farmers.According to the farmers, they were there as early as 06:00h on Friday and were trying to get the attention of senior management of the rice complex but no one was willing to speak with them. One farmer said the group decided to protest and make noise outside the entity as they demanded to see the manager for their payments.The owed farmers said the manger eventually met with them and agreed to give them payments between $50,000 and $100,000 until full payments are available.The farmers said they have their monthly bank installment to meet and the cash given to them in some cases cannot even meet the required payment.Speaking with Guyana Times, a mother who was also outside the factory protesting, said it is not easy for her to financially manage her home. She said she has to finance her children’s education, which is a very expensive exercise. One is at one the Cyril Potter College of Education (CPCE), one is at the University of Guyana, and the other is writing the Caribbean Examination Council next year.Some of the other women who were also on the protest line said they are single parents and are depending only on their meagre earnings from the rice industry for their survival. “It will be a dull, dull Christmas for us,” one woman said.last_img read more

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