Key Algonquin chief wants tighter rules on who can be part of

first_img(Algonquins of Ontario claim map)Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsThe chief of the Algonquin band at the centre of a massive Ontario land claim says he’d like to see the eligibility criteria for membership tightened as another report surfaced this week questioning the Indigenous heritage of over a third of individuals on the list for an upcoming vote on the modern day treaty covering a large swath of the province, including the city of Ottawa.Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation Chief Kirby Whiteduck said many in his community have expressed concerns about the current eligibility criteria to become part of the Algonquins of Ontario (AOO) modern day treaty process. Kirby said he has expressed these misgivings internally and with the negotiators for Ontario and the federal government.“If we do continue this discussion, I think Pikwakanagan is going to be drawing attention to the criteria because Pikwakanagan members are expressing concerns and questions about it,” said Whiteduck, in an interview Friday.A tighter AOO eligibility criteria could mean some on the list to vote next week to approve an interim step along the modern day treaty process, also known as a comprehensive claim, may not qualify to become beneficiaries by the time a final agreement is signed.A report released Thursday by an Algonquin organization based in Quebec claimed to show that over one-third of the individuals on the AOO voters list haven’t had an Indigenous ancestor in their family tree for up to 300 years.The report, released Thursday, was produced by the Algonquin Nation Secretariat (ANS) which represents three Algonquin First Nation in Quebec. Two of the member Algonquin bands have overlapping claims with the AOO claim.The ANS report surfaced as opposition to the AOO has grown within Pikwakanagan ahead of a vote to approve or reject the proposed treaty’s agreement-in-principle (AIP). Voting is scheduled to begin Feb. 29 and run to March 7.Click here for more coverage of Algonquins of Ontario modern day treaty.Opponents from Pikwakanagan First Nation—the only Algonquin First Nation band involved in the vote—plan to hold a protest Sunday.The AOO claim covers about 3.6 million hectares stretching from Algonquin Park east to Hawkesbury, Ont., including Ottawa, and down into territory near Kingston, Ont.  If finalized, the deal would see $300 million in capital funding and 47,550 hectares of Ontario Crown land transferred to the AOO.There are a total of 10 communities that make up part of the AOO claim, but only Pikwakanagan is a recognized band under the Indian Act. The other nine are recognized as Algonquin communities only within the framework of the AOO treaty talks.The ANS report analyzed the ancestry of the 7,714 individuals on the AOO voters list. Of the total, only 663 on the list are from Pikwakanagan itself, the report said. The rest, 7,051, qualified to be on the list as a result of having a “root ancestor” connected to the signatories of petition letters sent by area Algonquins in the 1770s to the Crown seeking reserve lands in what is now known as Ontario.“It…appears that the ‘Algonquins’ who are relying on these root ancestors have had no intermarriage with anyone of Algonquin or Nipissing ancestry for at least 200 and, in some cases, more than 300 years,” said the report, written by Peter Di Gangi and Alison McBride for the ANS.The report concluded that  3,016 individuals on the AOO list, about 39 per cent, fall within this category.“This is our assessment based on the information we had available,” said Di Gangi, director of policy and research for the ANS. “If anyone has information that sheds further light on this that clarifies this, I would love to see it.”The analysis looked at 10 of the root ancestors used by those on the AOO voters list to qualify as potential beneficiaries of the eventual treaty. These root ancestors had origins dating to the 1600s or 1700s, the report said. In the majority of the cases the descendants of these ancestors were French-Canadian over the subsequent 10 to 15 generations which represents as time span of about 300 years, according to the report.The AOO is disputing the ANS report, calling it flawed.“It is unfortunate that this report was released without any effort having been made to seek input from the AOO who compiled the data that was accessed just to see whether the conclusions and the facts upon which those conclusions are based are accurate,” said Robert Potts, the chief negotiator for the AOO. “Clearly the intent of this rush to judgment is to disrupt, if not undermine, the transparent and democratic process that is underway to vote on an (AIP) that will have no legal nor binding impact and is intended to provide a framework for negotiating a treaty.”Potts said the AOO’s own genealogist analyzed the ANS report and found that it had under-counted the number of Pikwakanagan members on the list. Potts said the actual number is 840. He said 179 Pikwakanagan members decided to be represented through one of the nine other Algonquin groupings that are part of the claim.Potts said five of the 10 root ancestors analyzed by the ANS report already faced and passed eligibility challenges through the AOO’s independent adjudication process handled by an elders committee and a retired judge. The five root ancestors met the AOO’s criteria for root ancestors, said Potts. The other five root ancestors have not faced any challenges, he said.“Presumably because there was a lack of credible evidence on which to base such a challenge,” said Potts.The ANS analysis follows a report by Kebaowek First Nation—an Algonquin community based in Quebec—released to APTN earlier this month which studied at a small sample of 200 individuals from the AOO voters list. The Kebaowek report found that 72 of the 200 had only one Algonquin ancestor stretching back six generations.Greg Sarazin, a former Pikwakanagan chief and treaty negotiator, acts as the spokesperson for growing opposition to the modern treaty within the community. He said the current proposed agreement would lead to the extinguishment of Pikwakanagan and its tax-free status under the Indian Act.“The rights of the future of Pikwakanagan, who are the status people, is being decided largely by people who are not status from Pikwakanagan,” said Sarazin, who was chief from 1987 to 1989. “We don’t want this AIP because it will be the end of Pikwakanagan.”The Whiteduck band council recently circulated a question and answer document in an attempt to alleviate concerns. The document says ratification of the modern treaty would not extinguish Pikwakanagan’s reserve status or its tax exemption. The document said those issues would be part of an eventual self-government aspect of the treaty to be dealt with further down the line.Sarazin said the band council is splitting hairs because the current proposed treaty deal puts Pikwakanagan on the path to extinguishment.“We are saying right now, we don’t want to do this,” he said.Sarazin said many Pikwakanagan members were surprised to learn they were not automatically put on the AOO voters list for next week’s vote. He said the band council will be holding a side vote to include all registered band members, but it remains unclear how those results will mesh with the AOO results.“People are fighting for their very existence,” he said.Whiteduck said Pikwakanagan members need to get the full story. He said the AIP is not binding and the final agreement will be improved through more negotiations.“If they say no for legitimate, good reasons then that’s fine, I accept it. But we think we can still change things in the AIP,” said Whiteduck. “If not, we lose the opportunity to improve things and change the things they (the opposition) are looking to have changed…Everything is not going to be exactly what we want in the agreement, but some things will be better…Overall, it is an improvement compared to staying with the status quo and where that takes us.”And the status quo could lead to Pikwakanagan disappearing, said Whiteduck.An internal analysis produced by the band council projected there may be no one left in Pikwakanagan with Indian status within 60 to 70 years as a result of the restrictive status criteria under the Indian Act, said Whiteduck.“Under the current Indian Act regime the membership is going to dwindle and at some point there might be no members, no one with status, everyone will be subject to taxes and the reserve won’t belong to anybody,” said Whiteduck.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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NYC buzz on for TeamTCI business pleasure

first_img Recommended for you Luxury events for Chicago’s leading travel and media professionals hosted by #TeamTCI Fish ‘n’ Grits was a hit in Singapore; TCI Culinary Ambassadors return from Singapore Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppNew York City was great for the Turks and Caicos – for business and for pleasure.The Invest Turks and Caicos Agency debuted on the international scene last night, in a penthouse suite at the Gansevoort on Park Avenue with potential investors hosted by John Rutherford and Angela Musgrove of the recently, rebooted investment arm.At Le District, there was a true buzz as travel agents met with the TeamTCI delegation for the presentation which featured the famous Caya Hico Media video, remarks by the Premier & Tourism Minister and vacation giveaways led by Nikheel Advani of Grace Bay Resorts.Mark Durliat, CEO of Grace Bay Resorts was also a part of the investment unit function held just one hour before the tourism meeting.A special appearance came at The District when internationally renowned Middle Caicos conceived, South Caicos born, sculpture and painter, Bradley Theodore was well received… he too endorsed the Turks and Caicos as a luxury escape with intrinsic beauties and life’s simplicities still intact.At the event, Global Traveler Magazine presented Tourism Minister, Chairman and Director and Premier Rufus Ewing with yet another ‘Best of’ prize… Grace Bay Beach was again named top in the world by the Five Star publication. Related Items:newyorkcity, nyc, Tci, teamtci Turks and Caicos named Caribbean’s Leading Beach Destination at World Travel Awards Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

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BAHAMAS Minister of Tourism Has Meeting with Executives of Paradise Island Promotion

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, February 25, 2018 – Nassau – Minister of Tourism & Aviation, the Hon. Dionisio D’Aguilar (centre) met with members of the Paradise Island Promotion Board at the Ocean Club Boardroom, February 19, 2018.Board Members, pictured from left: John Conway, Interim Chairman (Ocean Club, A Four Season Resort Bahamas}; George Myers, Chairman Emeritus (Bay View Suites, Paradise Island); Audrey Oswell, President & Managing Director, Atlantis Paradise Island; Minister D’Aguilar; William Naughton, Vice-Chairman/Paradise Island (Comfort Suites Paradise Island); Graeme Davis, Vice-Chairman/Cable Beach (Baha Mar Resort); and Fred Lounsberry, Chief Executive Officer.(BIS Photo/Kemuel Stubbs) Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:last_img read more

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San Diego Police leaders defend use of controversial neck restraint

first_img Updated: 11:46 AM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Some community members asked the San Diego Police Department to take a closer look at the use of a tactic called a “carotid restraint.” While critics say the practice isn’t safe, the department says the neck hold can be an effective policing tool, as an intermediate force tactic and a non-lethal use of force.A recent review by the police department found that the carotid restraint was used more than 400 times over a five year period between 2013 and 2017.Lieutenant Jim Jordon from the San Diego Police Department says a choke hold that pushes against the windpipe isn’t legal, but the vascular neck hold which obstructs blood flow, not air flow can be effectively used in cases involving assaultive or combative subjects. The technique applies pressure to the blood vessels on the side of the neck, until the person loses consciousness.The police department’s review last September revealed that the carotid restraint was used 58 percent of the time on subjects who were actively resisting and 28 percent in situations that also involved alcohol or narcotics. The carotid restraint was applied on African America subjects in 25 percent of the incidents. African Americans are 6 and a half percent of the city’s population.Community members have expressed reservations about the safety of the hold and whether the restraint could lead to death.  The department said it did not know of any incidents that resulted in death or significant injury.The police department said based on its review, it will continue to use the carotid restraint, although it will make some policy changes to sure the practice is safe. Those revisions include an annual review of the use of force, more frequent police training on the neck hold, taking subjects to whom the restraint was applied to a hospital for a medical evaluation and banning the use of the tactic on high risk individuals such as the elderly, those who are st obviously juveniles and pregnant women.The carotid restraint puts pressure on each side of the suspect’s neck, as shown in the photo below. FacebookTwitter May 20, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News Sasha Foo Posted: May 20, 2019 San Diego Police leaders defend use of controversial neck restraint Sasha Foo, last_img read more

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French delegation detained in Turkey during election

first_imgAn election committee member shows a ballot displaying a vote for Selahattin Demirtas, presidential candidate of the pro-Kurdish People`s Democratic Party (HDP) at a polling station during the Turkish presidential and parliamentary elections in Istanbul on 24 June 2018. Turks voted on 24 June in dual parliamentary and presidential polls seen as the president`s toughest election test, with the opposition revitalised and his popularity at risk from growing economic troubles. Photo : AFPA French delegation of Communist party members, including a senator, was detained in Turkey on Sunday while trying to observe parliamentary and presidential polls there, the party announced.”Turkish authorities want to snuff out any criticism of the massive fraud underway,” a Communist Party statement said, adding that senator Christine Prunaud was among those detained.The state-run Turkish news agency Anadolu reported Sunday that around 10 Europeans faced legal action including three French citizens, three Germans and four Italians allegedly for acting as election observers without accreditation .One of the arrested French Communists, Hulliya Turan, told AFP that the group was arrested in Agri in the east at 1030 am (0730 GMT) and held all day in a police station until 5 pm when polling stations closed.”They told us that we will not be prosecuted because our presence was not a crime,” Turan said.Turkey’s main opposition party, the Republican People’s Party (CHP), has expressed alarm over the number of complaints of voting violations in the mainly Kurdish south east of the country.Turks are voting in twin legislative and parliamentary elections which are seen as the toughest test president Recep Tayyip Erdogan has undergone at the ballot box.Tens of thousands of Turkish citizens are responding to calls from the opposition to monitor the polls for a clean election and a delegation of observers from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) is also in place.last_img
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Trending styles in loafers moccasins

first_imgLoafers and moccasins have become increasingly popular in today’s times as they have been identified as the most convenient style of shoes. But there’s a whole variety that you can explore from. Experts have shared tips on the types to choose from: -Brogue loafer with medallion: One of the most promising trends in loafers, these styles create a distinctive look with a decorative medallion on the toe and come with a vintage finish. A must-have shoe style for fashion connoisseurs, these shoes offers a contemporary and sharp touch when teamed with a crisp shirt and chinos. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf-Penny loafer with cord stitch: Considered as one of the trendiest styles in semi-casual shoe range, penny loafers add perfect aesthetics to a man’s wardrobe and bring in a touch of much needed versatility. Penny loafers embody refined sophistication and are an ideal companion for sharp dressing office goers and trendy millennials. -Brogue wing tip Kelty moccasins: Designed with W shaped patch on the toe with broguing throughout, these styles give a brilliant and suave touch when crafted in patent leather. An ideal option for those heading for a party or a cocktail night, this style renders a dynamic styling essence when teamed with dress shirts or blazers. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive-Tassel loafer: Amazingly stylish, tassel design loafers are one of the most wanted styles by men. With the increasing popularity, loafers have become more experimental with designs – one, two tassels and fringes. Also, loafers in special shades (wine, carnet, maroon, blue) can make you stand out from the crowd. Tassel loafers are uniquely versatile to pair for any event like party, work meeting or for wedding. Dark wine tassel loafer can play well with three piece black suit for event or wedding whereas tan loafers can go with well with party look (black jeans with white shirt). -Penny loafer: The penny loafers are minimal stylish shoes in the most traditional styles. It is also versatile to wear with any outfit. The shoe emerged as a classic American staple, featuring predominantly in collegiate outfits across the country. It is a preferred shoe option due to its simplistic style and easy adaptability. Today, the penny loafer is a nod to the past but available in a range of different materials suiting every gentleman’s taste. Penny loafers are highly available in three shades – black, brown, and wine for formal look. -Loafer colours: Now, men are more interested to go with experimental colours in loafer to highlight the appearance. Black may be classic, but unusual tones like burgundy, wine, magenta loafers can be more versatile to get dapper look. Different colours in loafer are high trend these days and can add more stylish essence.last_img read more

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