Lowry mum on Raptors, speaks only about USA Basketball

first_img‘High crimes and misdemeanors’: Trump impeachment trial begins LATEST STORIES In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Palace OKs total deployment ban on Kuwait OFWs United States men’s national team basketball coach Gregg Popovich, right, speaks with Kyle Lowry during a training camp for USA basketball, Thursday, July 26, 2018, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)LAS VEGAS — Kyle Lowry knew people wanted to ask him about DeMar DeRozan.That didn’t mean he was going to give them answers.ADVERTISEMENT Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Kyle, your thoughts?“I’m here for USA Basketball,” Lowry repeated. “It’s been a great week for USA Basketball.”Lowry is coming off his lowest scoring output in five seasons, after averaging 16.2 points and 6.9 assists per game last year, considerably lower than the career-high 22.4 he averaged the previous season.But, as the oldest player attending the two-day mini-camp, the 32-year-old said he wasn’t as concernced about working on his game or anything particular as much as he was providing leadership at USA Basketball’s first minicamp of this Olympic cycle.“Just build chemistry and be a leader, be a voice,” Lowry said. “We all know each other, we all have massive respect for each other so just coming to hang out and kick it is fun.”ADVERTISEMENT DepEd’s Taal challenge: 30K students displaced Putin’s, Xi’s ruler-for-life moves pose challenges to West Trump assembles a made-for-TV impeachment defense team Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Report: Disney dropping the ‘Fox’ from movie studio names MOST READ Capela signs five-year, $90 million extension with Rockets Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. It was a USA Basketball minicamp in Las Vegas, and that’s all that Lowry — the Toronto Raptors point guard who watched his longtime backcourt partner get traded to the San Antonio Spurs last week — wanted to talk about. So, when he was asked about DeRozan on Friday, no matter how reporters tried to pose questions, Lowry tailored his answers the exact same way.“It’s been a great week for USA Basketball for me,” he said. “Being out here with these guys and hanging out and getting to talk and hang out with these guys and hanging out with DeMar and all those guys, it’s been fun.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’“Summer has been great in general for everyone. Just to have the opportunity to relax and work on your game and prepare for the upcoming season.”DeRozan and Lowry are very close friends on the court and off, and neither was happy to see the trade. DeRozan was shipped to the San Antonio Spurs on July 18, along with center Jakob Poeltl and a protected 2019 first round pick, in exchange for Kawhi Leonard and wing Danny Green. Lowry, who won a gold medal with the national team at the 2016 Rio Olympics, said one of the biggest benefits for him has been absorbing as much information from former USA Basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski, and new coach Gregg Popovich, also DeRozan’s new head coach.“They’re two of the greatest coaches to ever coach the game of basketball,” Lowry said. “Coach K has been amazing, having the opportunity to spend a lot of time with him three summers ago was awesome, and even these last three days with Pop has been fun.”And while Lowry refused to discuss his close friend’s departure or anything pertaining to the Raptors, DeRozan said he was confident his former teammate would be just fine without him thanks to a basketball IQ he respects.“His knowledge of the game, just his IQ of the game, it stands out, bar none,” DeRozan said. “Just talking about basketball, understanding basketball, reading basketball. It’s great to see that.”DeRozan said both players understand the league is about business.“Kyle is Kyle, at the end of the day this is our profession,” DeRozan said. “We understand what comes with the job. It’s gonna be simple, we all gotta job and got responsibilities to take care of with our home team. What happened, happened. He gotta do what he gotta do for his team and I go to do what I got to do for mine.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lacson: Calamity fund cut; where did P4 billion go? View commentslast_img read more

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Liberia: The Cultural Gap

first_imgMonrovia – Growing up in Liberia, whenever I call my name, I garner the stares and expressions of a name that sounds too strong or otherwise traditional. In fact, I get the feeling from facial expressions that the name belongs to another world, especially in my case, as both names are purely Liberian indigenous names. While in secondary school, it was worse. The calling of my name was greeted with instant laughter, jeers and intentional mispronunciations, intended to instill humiliation and fear. I remember many colleagues couldn’t bear the emotional bullying associated with bearing traditional African names and opted to have their names changed. This is typical of the average Liberian classroom where western names are pronounced with distinction and claimed with pride but traditional Liberian names are wrongly pronounced and treated with disdain. The name carrier bore the burnt of the struggle and left to face the accompanying degradations.The name scenario is a tip of the iceberg of the extent to how wide Liberians have negated their culture with western cultures, and in some cases other African cultures over their own cultures. A Liberian would prefer to be proudly called by another West African name and claim lineage to that country or ancestral history, but would refuse to proudly bear his name given under sacred conditions by his or her grandparents. Treasured and rich names with deep history are relegated to borrowed names. There are varying examples to the nature and breadth of how Liberians have abandoned their cultures over the years to diffusing and assimilating completely into others. This trend has affected generations to such a dangerous extent that there remains a major gap in the culture. Major tribes have histories of their founding fathers and how they came to being but have chosen to ignore those stories, completely forgotten to speak native dialects, hence a whole generation of young children grow up unable to speak their dialects. Ironically, the inability to speak one’s language comes with a false sense of sophistication. The ignorance of one’s history and cultural practices meant a man was too ‘civilized’ to conform. The reality is sad. A society without a clear definition of its history and culture has no foundation to build upon, and no purpose. We have a completely shattered appreciation of our culture from clothing, cuisine, language, history, etc. Every society has a signature delicacy that is known by foreigners upon entering that country. We have several dishes, from hot cooked palm butter and bitter roots to potato greens with red palm oil, bitter balls mixed with okra and fresh water palm oil to torborgee and rice, palava sauce and rice, domboy and pepper soup and GB with wollor soup. These are delicious delicacies that can be marketed and possibly exported to showcase the kinds of food we eat as Liberians. Culture is the melting pot of a group of people and the lining that binds us together. How many average Liberian kids understand the relevance and role of traditional chiefs, traditional dance ceremonies for birth, funerals, and other occasions?There is a surge in learning how to speak like other West Africans, copying their accents, but afraid to identify with our own accents. We have to develop ourselves and develop a spirit of cultural identity.Cultural identity is often defined as the identity of a group, culture or an individual, influenced by one’s belonging to a group or culture.A developmental psychologist, Jean S. Phinney, formulated a three stage model describing how this identity is acquired.The first stage, unexamined cultural identity, is characterized by a lack of exploration of culture and cultural differences – they are rather taken for granted without much critical thinking. This is usually the stage reserved for childhood when cultural ideas provided by parents, the community or the media are easily accepted. Children at this stage tend not to be interested in ethnicity and are generally ready to take on the opinions of others.The second stage of the model is referred to as the cultural identity search and is characterized by the exploration and questioning of your culture in order to learn more about it and to understand the implications of belonging to it. During this stage you begin to question where your beliefs come from and why you hold them. You are now ready to compare and analyze them across cultures. For some, this stage may arise from a turning point in their lives or from a growing awareness of other cultures, and it can also be a very emotional time. This is often the time when high school students decide to go on an intercultural exchange program.Finally, the third stage of the model is cultural identity achievement. Ideally, people at this stage have a clear sense of their cultural identity and are able to successfully navigate it in the contemporary world, which is undoubtedly very interconnected and intercultural. The acceptance of yourself and your cultural identity may play a significant role in your other important life decisions and choices, influencing your attitudes and behavior. This usually leads to an increase in self-confidence and positive psychological development.It seems we’re walloping in the first stage of cultural identity and are mimicking other cultures and taking the opinions of others about ourselves. Until we realize who we are, where we come from and what we want, the road to the future would be blurred, and we risk becoming cultural chameleons.Lekpele Nyamalon is a Liberian writer and poet, an OSIWA Poetry fellow and can be reached at: nyamalon@yahoo.com Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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