Update on the latest sports

first_imgKANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Kansas City Chiefs have agreed with defensive tackle Chris Jones on a four-year, $85 million contract extension that includes $60 million in guarantees. That word comes from a person familiar with the deal.The Chiefs and representatives for Jones have been working on a contract extension ever since last year, when they remained far apart on terms and the Pro Bowl selection skipped the entirety of the offseason program. Jones was back in time for training camp and helped the Chiefs win their first Super Bowl in 50 years in February.Elsewhere in the NFL:— A person familiar with the negotiations tells The Associated Press that the Cleveland Browns are closing in on a massive contract extension with star defensive end Myles Garrett. He was the No. 1 overall pick in 2017 and is one of the NFL’s premiere edge rushers. Garrett and the Browns could have the deal completed in the next day or so. NFL Network reported the extension could be for five years and $125 million. NHL-ISLANDERS-SOROKIN Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditVIRUS OUTBREAK-MLB-BLUE JAYSCanadian health official suggests longer Blue Jays homestandTORONTO (AP) — A top Canadian government health official says a longer stretch of home games might help the Blue Jays to get approval to play in Toronto amid the pandemic. — Jake Burger is going to play in a local league this summer in his hometown of St. Louis after the Chicago White Sox approved the plan for their first-round pick in the 2017 amateur draft. It’s a chance for the third baseman to get back on the field after he tore his left Achilles tendon twice, sidelining him for each of the previous two seasons. — Fans wanting to see their faces at Dodger Stadium this season can buy cutouts. The team says net proceeds from the sale will benefit the Los Angeles Dodgers Foundation. Cutouts in the Dugout Club or new Pavilion Home Run Seats cost $299. Field and loge cutout locations cost $149. The cutouts are 18 inches wide and 30 inches high. The images are subject to team approval. VIRUS OUTBREAK-NBAKings’ Barnes isn’t at NBA restart, says he has coronavirusLAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. (AP) — Harrison Barnes of the Sacramento Kings became the latest NBA player to reveal that he has coronavirus, making the announcement Tuesday and saying he has hopes to join his team at the league’s restart later this summer. Barnes is the only player who has started all 64 of the Kings’ games this season. To extend that streak, he’ll need to be cleared and arrive at Walt Disney World before Sacramento’s season resumes with the first of its eight seeding games on July 31 against San Antonio.VIRUS OUTBREAK-SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCESoutheastern Conference postpones start of some sportsUNDATED (AP) — The Southeastern Conference is postponing the start of volleyball, soccer and cross country competition through at least the end of August because of COVID-19. The league says that provides more time to prepare for a safe return to competition on an adjusted timeline. The decision includes all exhibition and non-conference games. Deputy Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Howard Njoo says back and forth travel from the U.S. where cases are surging is a major issue that could prevent the government from approving MLB to play in Canada. MLB requires an exemption to a requirement that anyone entering Canada for nonessential reasons must self-isolate for 14 days. The U.S.-Canada border remains closed to nonessential travel. The Blue Jays’ home opener is scheduled for July 29 against Washington.In other MLB news:— About 10 Major League Baseball umpires have opted out this season, choosing not to work games in the shortened schedule because of concerns over the coronavirus. There are 76 full-time MLB umpires and more than 20 of them are age 55 or over. Joe West and Gerry Davis are the oldest umps at 67. Umpires who are deemed at risk — either for their age, health situation or other issues — and opt out will continue to get paid. Umps get their salaries over 12 months and have already been paid through April. July 14, 2020 Associated Press — Several people familiar with the conversations tell The Associated Press that the baseball players’ association has discussed hiring noted sports lawyer Jeffrey Kessler to litigate a contemplated grievance against clubs. The grievance would accuse Commissioner Rob Manfred and management of failing to act in good faith to complete the longest season economically feasible. A grievance has not yet been filed and an agreement with Kessler has not been finalized.— Minnesota Twins center fielder Byron Buxton has a sprained left foot but no structural damage. Further testing revealed the diagnosis Tuesday, a day after his injury in an intrasquad game at Target Field. The Twins said Buxton would be evaluated on a day-to-day basis. He got hurt tracking a fly ball and lost his balance. —Yankees pitcher Masahiro Tanaka is unsure whether he will be able to take his first turn through the rotation as he recovers from a line drive off his head. Tanaka was hit on the right side near the temple by Giancarlo Stanton’s shot during batting practice on July 4. While the 31-year-old right-hander says he has no concussion symptoms, he has not thrown off a mound since. —A person with knowledge of the deal says the Atlanta Braves have agreed to a one-year deal with free agent outfielder Yasiel Puig (yah-SEEL’ pweeg). The agreement helps the NL East champions address a depth problem in their outfield. Nick Markakis recently opted out over concerns about the coronavirus. The 29-year-old Puig hit a combined .267 with 24 homers and 84 RBIs for Cincinnati and Cleveland in 2019. He also stole 19 bases.— Anthony Rizzo’s back trouble flared up again after he took batting practice over the weekend, and the Chicago Cubs are sending the slugger for tests. Rizzo has been dealing with back tightness during summer camp, a recurring problem throughout his career. The first baseman took live BP on Sunday before the issue surfaced again. Manager David Ross says Rizzo remains day to day. The USTA says the sort of COVID-19 testing and universal housing planned for the U.S. Open “would logistically and financially be incredibly difficult to create” at these national events. The team announced Tuesday that it plans to play in front of about 20% of Gillette Stadium’s capacity, if approved by state and local officials. The stadium’s capacity is just under 66,000. The Patriots also informed season ticket holders that if fans are allowed at the stadium, they will be asked to adhere to physical distancing of at least six feet. Tickets will be arranged in blocks of 10 seats or fewer, with the first eight rows of the stadium not in use. Face coverings will also be required at all times.Patriots season ticket holders will have the first opportunity to purchase individual game tickets. Any remaining ticket inventory will go on sale to the general public. NFL-CHIEFS-JONESChiefs have four-year extension with Jones Update on the latest sports VIRUS OUTBREAK-USTAUSTA cancels amateur eventsUNDATED (AP) — The U.S. Tennis Association has canceled several amateur events scheduled in August because of the coronavirus pandemic but is still planning to hold the U.S. Open starting Aug. 31.USTA National Championships in certain junior age groups for singles and doubles are being scrapped.Men’s and women’s USTA National Grass Court Championships in Newport, Rhode Island, are also among the tournaments eliminated. — Blackhawks defenseman Calvin de Haan missed practice because of a family emergency. Coach Jeremy Colliton said he isn’t sure when de Haan will be back. The 29-year-old de Haan is coming back from right shoulder surgery in December. He was acquired in a June 2019 trade with Carolina. NHL-TED LINDSAY AWARD FINALISTSDraisaitl, MacKinnon among finalistsNEW YORK (AP) — NHL leading scorer Leon Draisaitl of the Oilers, Avalanche center Nathan MacKinnon and Rangers winger Artemi Panarin are the finalists for the Ted Lindsay Award. The trophy goes to the league’s most outstanding player as voted by fellow players. None of them have won the award before. Draisaitl finished first in points with 110 in 71 games before the season was halted because of the COVID-19 pandemic. MacKinnon helped injury-ravaged Colorado clinch a top four seed in the Western Conference. And Panarin had 95 points in his first season with New York. Islanders sign Sorokin for next seasonUNDATED (AP) — The New York Islanders have signed goaltender of the future Ilya Sorokin to a contract for next season. The $2 million deal includes $1 million in salary and a $1 million bonus. A day earlier, the team signed Sorokin to an entry-level deal for the remainder of this season even though he’s not eligible to play. The 24-year-old Sorokin is considered one of the top prospects at any position not current in the NHL. In NHL news:— Right wing Troy Terry has agreed to a three-year, $4.35 million contract extension through the 2022-23 season with the Anaheim Ducks. Terry has eight goals and 20 assists in 81 career games with the Ducks. They drafted him in the fifth round in 2015. He scored 15 points in 47 games this season.—The Minnesota Wild similarly signed fellow Russian Kirill Kaprizov to a two-year contract for this season and next. Kaprizov like Sorokin can’t compete in the resumption of the season. Each school will be responsible for any rescheduling of non-conference contests impacted by the postponement.The league hasn’t made any announcement on the football season. The Big Ten and Pac-12 have opted to only play conference games.VIRUS OUTBREAK-NFL-PATRIOTSPatriots hope to play before some fansFOXBOROUGH, Mass. (AP) — The New England Patriots have joined a growing list of NFL teams who hope to play home games this season in front of a significantly reduced number of fans to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.last_img read more

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Better Ballpark: Miller Park or Wrigley Field?

first_imgMiller ParkAs a Wisconsinite this was an easy choice. As a baseball aficionado, it wasn’t as easy, but history has it’s place … in history. I remain pretty confident in Miller Park.The lore of Miller Park starts outside the stadium where a bunch of pavement quickly turns into a mix of every type of blue and white pinstripes as Brewers fans tailgate about as well as anyone. Brats and beer are everywhere and frankly not a single substitute is worth it.If you’re visiting, you can’t go wrong drinking with Wisconsinites. They’d never let you down. And so, far before the game, your baseball experience is already off to an better start than the Chicagoans and their neighborhood.The scariest thing about that neighborhood is the stadium in the middle of it, actually. When I go to a baseball game, I’d prefer to be as safe as possible, not exposed to a concrete tangle that tends to fall apart at the corners from time to time. Miller Park’s newness kicks Wrigley’s falling bricks out to the side of I-90. Plus, there’s the roof.Ever have a great day go sour after a few raindrops? Not a problem in Milwaukee. Day ruined in Chicago’s north side. The retractable roof cost millions of dollars but it guarantees every fan that has a ticket has a dry seat in the stadium and a baseball game unfolding before them. It’s sadly not the case in Chi-town. The Midwest climate can be a dangerous thing for baseball’s multi-seasonal year; so don’t mess around with anything less than a guarantee.But the quality of baseball puts Miller Park over the top. The Billygoat and Bartman continue to curse the Cubbies from every taste at a championship. Meanwhile, the Brew Crew tend to weasel their way into talks of division contention seemingly every year.If I want to go to a baseball game, I want to see some winning baseball. This has happened much more in Milwaukee than Chicago over the last five years and this young season is no different. The Brewers have opened up a 14-12 record already in 2013. That includes a weekend sweep of the Cubs two weeks ago. I rest my case.-Sean ZakWrigley FieldTradition. Need I say more?Tradition and baseball go together like beer and tailgating. Over the years Wrigley Field has played host to some of the best baseball players to ever play the game. Think Ernie Banks, Sammy Sosa and Greg Maddux – one of which is a hall of famer,  while another was a part of one of the greatest slugoffs in baseball history in 1998 when his 66 home runs were barely bested by Mark McGwire’s 71. Miller Park can’t boast a back story like that.Sure the Brewers have been winners as of late, but in a comparison based purely on the venue, this seems like a cheap shot – kicking a losing team while it’s down. Besides, when you look at the two teams historically, the Cubs have had their share of success as well. In 2003 they made it to the National League Championship Series against the Florida Marlins before winning back-to-back division titles in 2007-2008.Nestled in the heart of “Wrigleyville,” Wrigley Field is a part of the very framework of the city around it – boasting a fan experience that can’t be found anywhere else. Where else can you sit in stands across the street on a rooftop and watch the game? Not to mention the close vicinity of some of the best restaurants and bars Chicago has to offer within minutes walking distance from the ballpark.So before you decide to “upgrade” to a new cushy, modern stadium, think about what you are giving up. Nothing beats sitting in the sun in Wrigley Field’s outfield bleacher section as a hot afternoon turns into cool summer evening, and as for a Cubs win, well that’s just a bonus.-Nick Danielslast_img read more

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