“Dull Christmas for us” – rice farmers

first_imgOver 300 rice farmers in Region Two (Pomeroon-Supenaam) and from the island of Wakenaam in Region Three (Essequibo Islands-West Demerara) flocked the gate of the Hack Rice Mill in Golden Fleece, Essequibo Coast demanding their payments.Farmers are concerned over the long delay in receiving payment from millers for paddy purchased since September and some even earlier this year. After a commotion erupted in front of the main gate of the rice factory, its management was forced to meet with the frustrated rice farmers.According to the farmers, they were there as early as 06:00h on Friday and were trying to get the attention of senior management of the rice complex but no one was willing to speak with them. One farmer said the group decided to protest and make noise outside the entity as they demanded to see the manager for their payments.The owed farmers said the manger eventually met with them and agreed to give them payments between $50,000 and $100,000 until full payments are available.The farmers said they have their monthly bank installment to meet and the cash given to them in some cases cannot even meet the required payment.Speaking with Guyana Times, a mother who was also outside the factory protesting, said it is not easy for her to financially manage her home. She said she has to finance her children’s education, which is a very expensive exercise. One is at one the Cyril Potter College of Education (CPCE), one is at the University of Guyana, and the other is writing the Caribbean Examination Council next year.Some of the other women who were also on the protest line said they are single parents and are depending only on their meagre earnings from the rice industry for their survival. “It will be a dull, dull Christmas for us,” one woman said.last_img read more

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SPORT-NZ-WARMUP 2 LAST

first_img(REOPENS DEL 48) (REOPENS DEL 48) One of the few times the pitch raised alarm bells was when southpaw Henry Nicholls was caught behind off left-arm-spinner Gohil, on a ball that rose sharply and the wicket-keeper collected it well above the waist height. All this while, Ronchi displayed top form as he dished out some delightful cover drives besides using the long handle effectively. He was literally dealing in boundaries as he hammered 12 fours on way to completing 50 runs off 57 balls. He clobbered three sixes and as many fours in the second half of his innings. As he punished the bowlers, wickets kept falling at the other end and by the time he was stumped after scoring a sublime hundred, New Zealand were left at a precarious 162 for six, just 22 ahead of Mumbai with more than a session remaining in the day. However, B J Watling (43) and Latham (25) calmed nerves in the dressing room after resuming from the tea break at 187 for six in 49 overs. They shared a 55-run stand to guide the team to safety. The game ended before the stipulated time when Ish Sodhi mishit to be caught at mid-on. Brief scores: New Zealand 324/7 decl and 235 all out in 66.4 overs (Ronchi 107, Watling 43; Valsangkar 3/41). Mumbai 464/8 decl in 114 overs. PTI BS PM PMlast_img read more

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STX Heavy Industries Eyes Capital Increase

first_imgzoom South Korean STX Heavy Industries has decided to launch a new capital increase scheme that will involve share offering and debt to equity conversion.The offering will see a total of 171, 495 of common stock issued at KRW 25,000 per share.The new shares are expected to be listed on February 1, 2018, the company said in a regulatory filing.STX Heavy Industries, which specializes in the design, manufacturing, and selling of diesel engines and other equipment for ships, went into court receivership in August 2016.The company suffered a major financial blow due to the shipbuilding industry slump.The engine manufacturer’s prospects worsened even further when its parent STX Offshore & Shipbuilding went into court receivership in 2016. The parent company accounted for the bulk of the company’s sales.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Anwars The Storm threads together stories of colonialism migration and communal hatred

first_imgArif Anwar, author of The Storm. Each story within The Storm becomes interconnected as their crisis points draw near. Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: In 1970, a catastrophic cyclone hit the shores of East Pakistan (now Bangladesh), resulting in the deaths of over a half million people. This unimaginable tragedy moors Toronto-based Arif Anwar’s first novel, The Storm.The Storm covers an almost fifty-year-period, starting in an unnamed village just before the cyclone, and then going back and forth in time from pre-partition Kolkata to the Japanese invasion of Burma during the Second World War to post-9/11 Washington, D.C.center_img Advertisement Advertisement Facebooklast_img read more

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