Sir Chris Hoy Supports Wheels For Change

first_imgUNICEF UK and Wheels for Change are encouraging 10,000 cyclists to saddle up. The 100km routes will start and finish at Barclays Premier League affiliated venues, including: 

• Cardiff City stadium;
• Crystal Palace’s Selhurst Park;
• Fulham’s training ground at Motspur Park, South West London;
• Liverpool FC’s Family Park, Anfield Road 
• Manchester United’s Old Trafford;
• Newcastle United’s training ground at Darsley Park; and
• Birmingham Road, outside West Bromwich Albion’s The Hawthorns. To register and find out more including how your money could help, visit the Wheels for Change website: www.wheelsforchange.co.uk. Cyclists across the UK can register for the Wheels for Change fundraising challenge. 

Seven 100km cycling events are taking place simultaneously on Saturday 24 May 2014, from multiple Barclays Premier League sites, promising to provide sports fans with a fantastic challenge, as well as the opportunity to raise funds for UNICEF, the world’s leading children’s organisation.

Wheels for Change, in aid of UNICEF and supported by Barclays, is aiming to raise more than £500,000. The money will help young people in some of the world’s poorest countries build a brighter future for themselves and their communities. UNICEF will use the funds raised to provide start-up funding and grants to help disadvantaged young people get their small businesses started.center_img Funds raised through Wheels for Change will enhance the work of the Barclays and UNICEF Building Young Futures partnership. The global partnership, which began in 2008, provides disadvantaged young people with the employability, enterprise and financial skills they need to find work, or set up their own small business.Sir Chris Hoy said: “As a UNICEF UK Ambassador, I’m proud to support Wheels for Change.
“Cycling transformed my life and now through this fundraising event we have the chance to help transform the lives of disadvantaged young people across the world, to turn their business dreams into a reality.”

Catherine Cottrell, Deputy Executive Director of Fundraising, at UNICEF UK said: “Wheels for Change is an excellent fundraising challenge which will have a hugely positive impact on some of the world’s most disadvantaged young people. It is fantastic that this is kicking off at Barclays Premier League grounds, so register now to make a difference and boost your fitness levels at the same time.”Shane Hawkins, Founder of Wheels for Change and a Managing Director at Barclays said: “Wheels for Change will help disadvantaged young people to build stronger futures for themselves and their communities. What better reason to get on your bike – I encourage you to sign up to the Wheels for Change challenge and help make a difference.” last_img read more

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The Elders Hail Germanys Engagement On Refugee And Migration Issues

first_imgThe Elders this week welcomed Germany’s engagement and efforts on refugee and migration issues, and called for greater European and global responsibility-sharing as part of a wider, comprehensive approach.Kofi Annan, Martti Ahtisaari and Lakhdar Brahimi made their call following meetings with German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier, Federal President Joachim Gauck, business leaders, civil society groups and refugees themselves during the two-day visit to Berlin – the first official visit to Germany by The Elders.Kofi Annan, Chair of The Elders, said: “We applaud Germany’s leadership on refugees and migration, and the bold decisions taken by Chancellor Merkel, Foreign Minister Steinmeier and the coalition government. These are complex, long-term issues that require far-sighted, compassionate leadership. The answer can never be to erect walls, or to claim that militarised borders or detention of migrants will stem the flow of desperate people.“We have been heartened by our meetings with political and business leaders, and especially with refugees themselves and the volunteers from all sections of German society who have made such selfless efforts to help people in need.”The Elders also launched a new report on refugees and migration during their visit, setting out four key principles that should govern the world’s approach to these complex issues. They believe that:

1. Response mechanisms to large flows of people must be developed and properly coordinated, both regionally and internationally.2. Assistance to major refugee-hosting countries must be enhanced.3. Resettlement opportunities must be increased, along with additional pathways for admission.4. Human rights and refugee protection must be upheld and strengthened.The Elders will continue to advocate these positions at a global level, including at the United Nations General Assembly and Refugee Summit next week in New York, and seek to ensure that the voices of refugees and migrants themselves are heard and respected as part of a truly compassionate, comprehensive policy approach.last_img read more

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Jane Lynch Writes Foreword For New Book Dog Obsessed

first_imgThe Honest Kitchen announces the launch of its new book, Dog Obsessed, a lifestyle guide for people who love their dogs as much as (and sometimes more than!) family.Dog Obsessed, written by Lucy PostinsWritten by CEO and co-founder Lucy Postins, and featuring a foreword by Jane Lynch, the book is packed with humorous, helpful advice that goes beyond the average dog-care book, including dos and don’ts in the dog park, how to ensure your pup’s holidays are safe and truly special, advice on how to manage your dog’s unique personality quirks, and a section on make-at-home dog games. Dog Obsessed is the only resource passionate dog owners will ever need and available now at The Honest Kitchen’s website as well as from booksellers nationwide and retailers of The Honest Kitchen’s line of all natural human grade foods for pets.Shunning the often dictatorial, prescriptive tone of many traditional pet care books, Dog Obsessed is a more lighthearted celebration of the western world’s deep-seated love of dogs and balances practical advice with amusing anecdotes (many contributed by The Honest Kitchen’s passionate fans), instructions for make-at-home dog toys, and steps for uncovering food allergies. This complete guide combines humorous advice with sound, veterinarian-approved programs for weight loss, exercise, and physical and emotional health, offering 45 easy-to-prepare recipes such as duck and ham dumplings, turkey and raspberry summer meatballs, pumpkin powwow with chicken and snap peas, plus celebratory party fare, complete with wine pairings.The Honest Kitchen will celebrate the book launch leading up to the holiday season with a series of in-store events and book signings. The brand is also hosting a social media campaign surrounding the book launch that will highlight dog horoscopes, look-alike photo contests, and online-exclusive bonus content. Please visit DogObsessed.com for more information.last_img read more

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Robert Patrick Brings Cheer To Hillsides Children With Toy Run

first_imgActor Robert Patrick of the CBS show “Scorpion” and some 125 fellow riders from the Boozefighters Motorcycle Club Chapter 101 and other local motorcycle clubs took part in a toy run for Hillsides, a foster care charity, prior to Christmas.The riders rode from Canyon Country, California to Hillsides main campus in Pasadena, California with a truck load of holiday gifts. Actors Mike Beach and Emilio Rivera from the FX show “Sons of Anarchy” were also among the riders. The toys were collected at the “Scorpion” set and through the Boozefighters motorcycle club.“This is the second year that Robert and his fellow riders have come onto campus bearing gifts, and it is a tremendous sight to see,” said Hillsides Chief Executive Officer Joseph M. Costa. “Not only did they collect hundreds of toys, the children who live at Hillsides get a huge kick out of talking to the riders and sitting on their motorcycles. This is a true highlight of the holidays for everyone.”Patrick, first made famous for his role as T-1000 in the 1991 movie “Terminator 2,” said that he feels compelled to give back because as a child, he was surrounded by a loving family who supported his dreams. “I love that Hillsides is giving kids a chance for opportunity and to change their lives,” he said. “I know from personal experience how important it is to have someone believe in you.”Patrick learned about Hillsides through his local Episcopal church, St. Thomas the Apostle in Hollywood. Hillsides has its roots in the Episcopal Church, having been founded in 1913 by an Episcopal deaconess, Evelyn Wile. Besides helping Hillsides, Patrick is a devoted advocate for veterans and has traveled around the world with the United Service Organization (USO) visiting troops.The Boozefighters Motorcycle Club is a nonprofit organization that raises funds for veterans and has participated in several toy runs over the years.The gifts collected through the toy run will be distributed to some of the 13,000 children and families Hillsides serves throughout Los Angeles County.last_img read more

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Toronto woman warns others about photos surfacing on anonymous imagesharing site

first_img Facebook Login/Register With: Anon-IB, which boasts the tag line “Best Anonymous Image Board,” has sections for various countries, including Canada, the U.S. and the U.K., and pages specific to cities and even universities. (DREAMSTIME) Advertisement In the past month, Roxanne messaged more than two dozen Ontario women on Facebook to warn them that their photos had surfaced on the image-sharing site Anon-IB.It’s something the Toronto resident has been doing on and off since she learned four years ago that her own photos had cropped up on the site — a place where users gather to share images, many of which are sexually explicit.“Part of me felt like a little bit of a creep doing this,” said Roxanne, who didn’t want her full name published out of concern her experience would affect her career in social work. “But … if I can track them down this easily, somebody with a worse motive can too.” The Canada forum on Anon-IB is currently 15 pages long, with threads for women at various universities and more than 30 Ontario communities.The website has rules prohibiting the posting of images of minors and a ban on the posting of “personal details like addresses, telephone numbers, social networks links, or last names.” But some users work around the rules by posting messages like, “(first name) L anyone? Surname rhymes with mammoth.”The photos of Roxanne that appeared on the site in 2013 were taken in 2011, she said. She had sent two photographs — taken in a crop top and underwear — to someone who befriended her on Facebook.Roxanne thought the person was a woman named Mary, who described herself as a queer feminist, a survivor of sexual violence and a women’s studies student. But when she began badgering Roxanne for explicit photos, Roxanne said she grew suspicious. After an internet search revealed that Mary’s profile photo appeared to be that of a pornography performer, Roxanne blocked the person.Nearly two years later, Roxanne said the photographs she sent to that person appeared in the Ontario sub-forum on Anon-IB, where users were specifically requesting “wins” — slang for nude photos — of her.Roxanne said she found out about the images only after an acquaintance pointed them out. The photos had been up for two days by that point, she said.“I (was) in shock,” she said. “Then terror and a sense of dread set in.”Roxanne tried to get her photos taken down by filling out a form on the website, but said her request was ignored.Under the Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act, it’s a crime to post or distribute an “intimate image” of another person without their consent.Roxanne decided to go to York regional police in Newmarket, Ont., a month after learning of her photos on Anon-IB.She knew it was unlikely they could get the images removed but she wanted to have a police record in case the matter escalated. She also wanted police to look into what she said were images of underage girls on the website.“The (officer) just looked bewildered,” she said.York regional police said they are aware of Roxanne’s case, that her file is still under investigation and no charges have been laid.Other police forces have also received the occasional complaint related to the website — RCMP in Antigonish, N.S., said they’ve been conducting an investigation related to Anon-IB since April, and police in Peterborough, Ont., said they became aware of the site after one complaint in the last two years. In both cases, no charges have been laid. Hamilton police said they had one investigation that involved the website but not a direct complaint against it.Ontario provincial police, Toronto police and Ottawa police said they have not received complaints about Anon-IB. Twittercenter_img Advertisement Roxanne, 24, typically finds the women she warns by searching on Facebook for their first names, the first letter of their last name and the community they’re believed to live in — all information that accompanies the photos posted on Anon-IB, which boasts the tag line “Best Anonymous Image Board.”The site — which did not respond to a request for an interview — has sections for various countries, including Canada, the U.S. and the U.K., and pages specific to cities and even universities. The level of detail can allow users to come across images of people they may actually know. Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Toronto lawyer Gil Zvulony said Roxanne’s photographs would not be considered “intimate” under the Criminal Code because they do not appear to depict any explicit sexual activity or nudity. He said women who find themselves on Anon-IB should still go to the police but noted that it’s unlikely charges would be laid if those who post the images remain anonymous on the website.Roxanne’s photos stayed on the site for about a year, she said, until it went offline briefly in 2014. When the site came back online, her images were gone.After her experience, Roxanne continued to think about what happened to her.“My coping mechanism was to go back on the website, find as many girls as I could, tip them off and go to bed,” she said.Katelyn, 23, was one of the women Roxanne messaged. She said she was 16 and 17 in most of the photos that she learned were on the site in August 2013.Katelyn said she has no idea who took photos from her Facebook and Plenty of Fish dating profile and edited them to make her shirts appear see-through, which was possible because she was wearing light-coloured tops without a bra, she said.After learning about her images, she asked the site to take them down. The photos were removed within 24 hours, she said, which is why she didn’t go to police.“I’m grateful that Roxanne reached out to me,” she said. “It’s important for women to keep mobilizing and looking out for one another.”last_img read more

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Anwars The Storm threads together stories of colonialism migration and communal hatred

first_imgArif Anwar, author of The Storm. Each story within The Storm becomes interconnected as their crisis points draw near. Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: In 1970, a catastrophic cyclone hit the shores of East Pakistan (now Bangladesh), resulting in the deaths of over a half million people. This unimaginable tragedy moors Toronto-based Arif Anwar’s first novel, The Storm.The Storm covers an almost fifty-year-period, starting in an unnamed village just before the cyclone, and then going back and forth in time from pre-partition Kolkata to the Japanese invasion of Burma during the Second World War to post-9/11 Washington, D.C.center_img Advertisement Advertisement Facebooklast_img read more

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JOHN CANDYS CHILDREN HELP HONOUR HIS TIMELESS LEGACY AT A TORONTO THEATRE

first_img Twitter Advertisement John Candy’s children say their father’s legacy is “almost timeless,” as the late Canadian comedian became the first inductee at the East York Hall of Fame in Toronto on Friday.The beloved comedy legend called the Ontario city home and his children say their dad never let his fame get to his head.“That’s how he was. This down-to-earth relatable guy that anyone could speak to and want to hear about your day,” Jennifer Candy told CTV National News anchor and W5 correspondent Sandie Rinaldo, saying he was always “happy to talk to anyone and everyone.” Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementcenter_img Candy starred in films such as “Spaceballs,” “Cool Runnings” and “Summer Rental” and even showed up in the Christmas classic “Home Alone.” Login/Register With: Advertisement John Candylast_img read more

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Wabauskang First Nation looking for mercury compensation

first_imgAPTN National NewsOttawa and the Ontario government closed the books on mercury compensation two decades ago for those affected along the English and Wabigoon Rivers.But members of the Wabauskang First Nation in Ontario are now fighting to be recognized as victims of mercury poising from the time they were relocated downstream of the contamination in the 1970s.APTN National News reporter Melissa Ridgen has this story.last_img

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Canary in a coal mine Melting Arctic open for business

first_imgAPTN National NewsPart of one of the three-part series ‘Canary in a coal mine’ Monday introduced Michele Thrush.The Cree actress was on board the Greenpeace ship Espirenza.The vessel toured northern Norway and showed celebrities and media about the realities of climate change.Tuesday’s story looks at how these changes affect the rest of the planet and how global warming has the Arctic open for business.APTN’s Tom Fennario now with part two.last_img

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Bloody Thunder Bay murder capital of Canada

first_imgAPTN National NewsThunder Bay is the largest city in northwestern Ontario.At first glance it looks like any other Canadian city.Except it isn’t.APTN’s Wayne Rivers reports that after a summer of bloody violence, Thunder Bay is anything but a typical northern community.last_img

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Lead up to the TRC closing events InFocus

first_imgAPTN InFocus with Cheryl McKenzie:In this edition we hear how churches and religious organizations have united under KAIROS.Together they’re working for reconciliation to reverse the attitudes of the past that encouraged the assimilation of Indigenous children through Canada’s residential schools.We also hear how Saskatoon’s Tribal Council is commemorating the closing of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.last_img

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Mohawk family pushing Ontario government to recognize traditional names

first_imgAPTN National NewsA Mohawk family living in Akwesasne is pushing to get the Ontario government to recognize traditional names.So far, the government has denied them.But they’re hoping that will change.APTN’s Annette Francis has the story.last_img

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Key Algonquin chief wants tighter rules on who can be part of

first_img(Algonquins of Ontario claim map)Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsThe chief of the Algonquin band at the centre of a massive Ontario land claim says he’d like to see the eligibility criteria for membership tightened as another report surfaced this week questioning the Indigenous heritage of over a third of individuals on the list for an upcoming vote on the modern day treaty covering a large swath of the province, including the city of Ottawa.Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation Chief Kirby Whiteduck said many in his community have expressed concerns about the current eligibility criteria to become part of the Algonquins of Ontario (AOO) modern day treaty process. Kirby said he has expressed these misgivings internally and with the negotiators for Ontario and the federal government.“If we do continue this discussion, I think Pikwakanagan is going to be drawing attention to the criteria because Pikwakanagan members are expressing concerns and questions about it,” said Whiteduck, in an interview Friday.A tighter AOO eligibility criteria could mean some on the list to vote next week to approve an interim step along the modern day treaty process, also known as a comprehensive claim, may not qualify to become beneficiaries by the time a final agreement is signed.A report released Thursday by an Algonquin organization based in Quebec claimed to show that over one-third of the individuals on the AOO voters list haven’t had an Indigenous ancestor in their family tree for up to 300 years.The report, released Thursday, was produced by the Algonquin Nation Secretariat (ANS) which represents three Algonquin First Nation in Quebec. Two of the member Algonquin bands have overlapping claims with the AOO claim.The ANS report surfaced as opposition to the AOO has grown within Pikwakanagan ahead of a vote to approve or reject the proposed treaty’s agreement-in-principle (AIP). Voting is scheduled to begin Feb. 29 and run to March 7.Click here for more coverage of Algonquins of Ontario modern day treaty.Opponents from Pikwakanagan First Nation—the only Algonquin First Nation band involved in the vote—plan to hold a protest Sunday.The AOO claim covers about 3.6 million hectares stretching from Algonquin Park east to Hawkesbury, Ont., including Ottawa, and down into territory near Kingston, Ont.  If finalized, the deal would see $300 million in capital funding and 47,550 hectares of Ontario Crown land transferred to the AOO.There are a total of 10 communities that make up part of the AOO claim, but only Pikwakanagan is a recognized band under the Indian Act. The other nine are recognized as Algonquin communities only within the framework of the AOO treaty talks.The ANS report analyzed the ancestry of the 7,714 individuals on the AOO voters list. Of the total, only 663 on the list are from Pikwakanagan itself, the report said. The rest, 7,051, qualified to be on the list as a result of having a “root ancestor” connected to the signatories of petition letters sent by area Algonquins in the 1770s to the Crown seeking reserve lands in what is now known as Ontario.“It…appears that the ‘Algonquins’ who are relying on these root ancestors have had no intermarriage with anyone of Algonquin or Nipissing ancestry for at least 200 and, in some cases, more than 300 years,” said the report, written by Peter Di Gangi and Alison McBride for the ANS.The report concluded that  3,016 individuals on the AOO list, about 39 per cent, fall within this category.“This is our assessment based on the information we had available,” said Di Gangi, director of policy and research for the ANS. “If anyone has information that sheds further light on this that clarifies this, I would love to see it.”The analysis looked at 10 of the root ancestors used by those on the AOO voters list to qualify as potential beneficiaries of the eventual treaty. These root ancestors had origins dating to the 1600s or 1700s, the report said. In the majority of the cases the descendants of these ancestors were French-Canadian over the subsequent 10 to 15 generations which represents as time span of about 300 years, according to the report.The AOO is disputing the ANS report, calling it flawed.“It is unfortunate that this report was released without any effort having been made to seek input from the AOO who compiled the data that was accessed just to see whether the conclusions and the facts upon which those conclusions are based are accurate,” said Robert Potts, the chief negotiator for the AOO. “Clearly the intent of this rush to judgment is to disrupt, if not undermine, the transparent and democratic process that is underway to vote on an (AIP) that will have no legal nor binding impact and is intended to provide a framework for negotiating a treaty.”Potts said the AOO’s own genealogist analyzed the ANS report and found that it had under-counted the number of Pikwakanagan members on the list. Potts said the actual number is 840. He said 179 Pikwakanagan members decided to be represented through one of the nine other Algonquin groupings that are part of the claim.Potts said five of the 10 root ancestors analyzed by the ANS report already faced and passed eligibility challenges through the AOO’s independent adjudication process handled by an elders committee and a retired judge. The five root ancestors met the AOO’s criteria for root ancestors, said Potts. The other five root ancestors have not faced any challenges, he said.“Presumably because there was a lack of credible evidence on which to base such a challenge,” said Potts.The ANS analysis follows a report by Kebaowek First Nation—an Algonquin community based in Quebec—released to APTN earlier this month which studied at a small sample of 200 individuals from the AOO voters list. The Kebaowek report found that 72 of the 200 had only one Algonquin ancestor stretching back six generations.Greg Sarazin, a former Pikwakanagan chief and treaty negotiator, acts as the spokesperson for growing opposition to the modern treaty within the community. He said the current proposed agreement would lead to the extinguishment of Pikwakanagan and its tax-free status under the Indian Act.“The rights of the future of Pikwakanagan, who are the status people, is being decided largely by people who are not status from Pikwakanagan,” said Sarazin, who was chief from 1987 to 1989. “We don’t want this AIP because it will be the end of Pikwakanagan.”The Whiteduck band council recently circulated a question and answer document in an attempt to alleviate concerns. The document says ratification of the modern treaty would not extinguish Pikwakanagan’s reserve status or its tax exemption. The document said those issues would be part of an eventual self-government aspect of the treaty to be dealt with further down the line.Sarazin said the band council is splitting hairs because the current proposed treaty deal puts Pikwakanagan on the path to extinguishment.“We are saying right now, we don’t want to do this,” he said.Sarazin said many Pikwakanagan members were surprised to learn they were not automatically put on the AOO voters list for next week’s vote. He said the band council will be holding a side vote to include all registered band members, but it remains unclear how those results will mesh with the AOO results.“People are fighting for their very existence,” he said.Whiteduck said Pikwakanagan members need to get the full story. He said the AIP is not binding and the final agreement will be improved through more negotiations.“If they say no for legitimate, good reasons then that’s fine, I accept it. But we think we can still change things in the AIP,” said Whiteduck. “If not, we lose the opportunity to improve things and change the things they (the opposition) are looking to have changed…Everything is not going to be exactly what we want in the agreement, but some things will be better…Overall, it is an improvement compared to staying with the status quo and where that takes us.”And the status quo could lead to Pikwakanagan disappearing, said Whiteduck.An internal analysis produced by the band council projected there may be no one left in Pikwakanagan with Indian status within 60 to 70 years as a result of the restrictive status criteria under the Indian Act, said Whiteduck.“Under the current Indian Act regime the membership is going to dwindle and at some point there might be no members, no one with status, everyone will be subject to taxes and the reserve won’t belong to anybody,” said Whiteduck.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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RCMP say three boys dead in Manitoba after being struck by vehicle

first_imgThe Canadian PressNELSON HOUSE, Man. — A northern Manitoba community is grieving after three young boys were struck and killed by an alleged drunk driver who fled the scene Saturday night.A 13-year-old and two 11-year-olds were on Provincial Road 620, two kilometres north of Nelson House when they were hit by a vehicle with five people in it around 10:30 p.m., RCMP said.Investigators said two of the children were walking and one was riding a bike on the road at the time.The children died at the scene and when officers arrived, they found the vehicle empty.“There was no driver or occupants at the time, as they had fled the scene. Within a short period of time, the four occupants returned back to the scene and provided information back to police about who the driver was, as he had fled on foot,” said RCMP spokesman Sgt. Paul Menaigre. “I guess they went after him, but he took off.”Information spread quickly through the community and by midnight, the driver walked into the Nelson House RCMP detachment and turned himself over to two officers, who were on their way to continue looking for him.The alleged driver, who is a 27-year-old member of the Nelson House community, was arrested without incident and remains in police custody.“He’ll be facing numerous charges, including fleeing the scene of an accident and numerous impaired driving-related charges,” Menaigre said.“We’ve conducted tests and determined he was impaired by alcohol.”Menaigre expected charges would be laid by Monday.He said in situations like this, the community is likely to feel shock, anger and grief.“Alcohol is involved, it could have easily been prevented. So there could be anger in the community, because we’re at the stage of not understanding ‘why’ _ that’s the anger part _ and then eventually there’s the grieving process. We want to get as much information as we can figured out quickly, so they can begin that process,” he said.Grand Chief Sheila North of the Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak, a political advocacy organization, said several staff members from Nelson House are grieving.“Everyone knows each other and it’s a growing, prospering community,” North said of the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation, which is based in Nelson House.“They’re very heartbroken and shocked. I talked to the [Nisichawayasihk] Chief Marcel Moody as well. He says the whole community is deeply saddened and in complete shock that the boys have succumbed to this kind of tragedy. His own grandsons are friends with those kids so it’s very close to home for the chief,” she said.North said the leadership is very progressive and in tune with the community’s needs, but it can only do the best it can without more funding for infrastructure projects like street lighting.Perry Bellegarde, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, sent condolences to members of the community on Sunday.“My heart goes out to the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation and the families of three young boys tragically killed last night while out for a bike ride. Extending love and support to all who knew them,” Bellegarde wrote on Twitter.Others also tweeted their support for the community.Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister posted his thoughts: “Our hearts go out to the families of three young boys who left us far too soon. To the entire community of Nelson House and NCN, we mourn this heartbreaking loss with you.”The Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs tweeted condolences on behalf of Grand Chief Arlen Dumas and assembly members.Nelson House is about 800 kilometres north of Winnipeg and 80 kilometres west of Thompson, Man. It is made up of four reserves, according to the Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation’s website.The Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation has around 4,600 members.last_img read more

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Irving Oil raises cautions about NB Liberals throne speech talk of carbon

first_imgFREDERICTON – Irving Oil says any New Brunswick carbon plan needs to allow the province’s businesses to remain competitive.Premier Brian Gallant’s government announced in Tuesday’s throne speech that his Liberal government would bring in carbon pricing that helps combat climate change.The premier says the pricing model will minimize the impact on consumers while calling on industry to reduce emissions or pay its fair share.In a statement sent to The Canadian Press, Irving Oil said 80 per cent of its production goes to the U.S., where its competitors face no carbon tax.Jeff Matthews, an executive from the firm, said in the release that the firm is “committed to working with all levels of government on a plan that protects the environment while also maintaining competitiveness for New Brunswick businesses.”He’s calling on the province to create a Made in New Brunswick carbon pricing model.last_img read more

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Sherritt to transfer part ownership of Madagascar mine to settled debt woes

first_imgTORONTO – Sherritt International Corp. (TSX:S) says it has reached a deal with the joint owners of a Madagascar mine that will see it transfer more ownership to cut its outstanding debt.The Toronto-based miner says it will shift a 28 per cent interest in the Ambatovy nickel mine joint venture to partners Sumitomo Corp. and Korea Resources Corp. in a deal that will eliminate $1.3 billion in partner loans from its balance sheet.Sherritt will be left with a 12 per cent stake in the mine, but remain operator until at least 2024.The company has struggled to make payments on its debt to the partners, and has been operating under a temporary deferral agreement while unable to make cash payments.Sherritt says the Ambatovy mine is the world’s largest finished nickel operation of its kind, with expected production this year of 36,000- to 39,000-tonnes of finished nickel and 3,300 to 3,600 tonnes of finished cobalt.The company also says it has had a fatality at its Energas S.A. power generation in Cuba due to an apparent electrocution.last_img read more

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Phoenix legal defeat prompts FAA to address noise concerns

first_imgPHOENIX – Nearly 100 people strolled through the high school cafeteria throughout the evening, studying colored graphs of flight takeoffs and jotting down comments for officials.More than three years after they awoke to find window-rattling flights rerouted in an airborne highway above their homes, residents of Phoenix’s downtown historic districts said they finally felt the Federal Aviation Administration was listening.A court victory by Phoenix and neighbourhood groups over the FAA last year has prompted the agency to be more responsive to residents as it continues to beat back noise complaints around the United States over the air traffic modernization plan known as “NextGen.”While challenges by residents of Washington’s Georgetown neighbourhood and other jurisdictions are still being heard in court, people in other affected areas such as Santa Cruz, California, have not sued the agency because they believe their complaints are being considered. Phoenix residents said they appreciated the FAA’s current approach.“They are being transparent now,” Opal Wagner, a resident of the vintage Willo district and vice-president of the Phoenix Historic Neighbourhoods Coalition, said at the first of three FAA public workshops held last week. She and others expressed disappointment that a fourth one wasn’t scheduled downtown where most noise complaints originated.“I think that it’s good that they are now dialoguing with the public,” Wagner said. “Maybe if they had done this in the beginning, there wouldn’t have been a lawsuit.”The historic districts and the city sued the agency after the FAA changed Phoenix Sky Harbor’s flight routes in September 2014, bringing airplane noise to public parks and the quiet neighbourhoods of charming bungalows, ranch houses and Spanish revival homes, some dating to the 1920s and earlier. About 2,500 households were affected. The noise got so bad for some, they sold their homes and moved.The FAA started revising flight paths and procedures around the United States in 2014 under the NextGen plan, which uses more precise, satellite-based navigation to save time, increase how many planes airports can handle, and reduce fuel burn and emissions. Noise complaints poured in from Orange County, California, to Washington, D.C., as flights took off at lower altitudes, in narrower paths and on more frequent schedules.The rollout of the procedures in Phoenix initially represented NextGen’s “most problematic implementation,” said Chris Oswald, vice-president of safety and regulatory affairs with Airports Council International-North America, a trade association that represents commercial airports in the U.S. and Canada. He said he was cautiously optimistic about the FAA’s more open approach.In the Phoenix case, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit on Aug. 29 agreed with the city and historic districts that the FAA was “arbitrary and capricious” in its flight procedure revisions in that area. The court said by leaving people in the dark, the agency made it impossible for the public to express views on the project’s potential effects — something the FAA is especially required to do for historic places and parks.Phoenix residents said they received no forewarning about the flight changes after FAA officials determined they would have no adverse impact and claimed a “categorical exclusion.”Following the court ruling, Phoenix and the FAA on Nov. 30 announced a joint plan aimed at resolving the dispute. Under the plan filed with the appellate court, the FAA agreed to reach out to residents while temporarily resuming the previous departure routes starting April 1.In a second step, it will develop satellite-based procedures for the original routes, seeking community feedback throughout the process.“I think we will get a considerable amount of relief with the return of the flights to their previous paths,” said Brent Kleinman, president of the Encanto-Palmcroft Historic Preservation Association in central Phoenix.“But the majority of the work is going to be in the second part of the process,” he said, which will decide the final flight paths.During last week’s workshops, Phoenix residents received printed material and mingled with FAA environmental experts and the airspace designers who fashion flight paths.“This is a format that we’ve used at other workshops, and it works really well,” said Ian Gregor, public affairs manager for the FAA’s Pacific Division, who attended all three sessions. “The people who have actually designed these procedures are on hand to answer questions.”Phoenix isn’t the only place where people say the FAA didn’t explain new routes or give them an opportunity to comment.In the Washington metro area, Georgetown University and neighbourhood groups have said the agency left them out of the loop about changes at Ronald Reagan National Airport. In nearby Maryland, residents objected to aircraft noise from both Reagan National and Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.But in Santa Cruz County, residents who initially complained about noise from planes headed to San Francisco said the FAA has been responsive to their worries. A dozen residents chosen by members of Congress in the three affected districts met with FAA representatives weekly throughout much of 2016 to come up with less obtrusive flight approach procedures.A new approach to the airport that is at least as quiet as it was before NextGen should take effect in August, said Denise Stansfield, founder of the Save our Skies citizen group. Technical problems temporarily increased noise for some residents recently, but once that pathway is permanently adopted, “you’re going to see the biggest celebration ever,” Stansfield said.___Anita Snow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/asnowreportslast_img read more

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Keeping staffers motivated productive during the holidays

first_imgNEW YORK — The holiday season can be a motivation and productivity killer at some small businesses. Staffers may spend time chatting or shopping online, ask to leave early for children’s holiday events or just not be in the mood to work.The companies with the most holiday problems are likely to be ones where November and December aren’t a particularly busy period — they’re not retailers, restaurants, caterers and other companies where staffers understand when they’re hired that this is prime time and everyone has to be physically and mentally present. At any company, if employees are distracted, owners may find that being firm but flexible will help keep everyone focused.Human resources professionals say holiday issues, like any matters that involve employees, are easier to resolve when staffers know in advance what the expectations and limits are. So, owners who sense that their workers are likely to be sitting and talking about parties and gifts may want to remind everyone now that chatting needs to be kept to a minimum. And if the owner or managers are seeing people giving in too much to temptation, a friendly, “hey, we have work to do,” is in order.It’s probably going to be impossible to completely stop staffers from shopping online. The solution may be to remind staffers that they should wait until break or lunch times to do their ordering. And if the owner sees someone shopping at other times, don’t make a big scene, but remind the staffer of the rules.Staffers who want to leave early for children’s plays or concerts should be given the chance to do so, but they also need to give the boss advance notice that there’s an event coming up and they must be held responsible for getting their work done. It may require some flexibility from an owner — allowing staffers to work remotely, come in early or leave late on another day. If the staffer needs a co-worker to cover for them, it’s the employee’s responsibility to set that up.HR pros warn that there’s a caveat about letting staffers leave for family events but not allowing others without children to take time to go to an event they’re interested in. Some employees can feel discriminated against if they see others getting what they feel is special treatment, and that could mean legal repercussions down the road. It’s best not to judge what kind of event is OK — as long as staffers are getting their work done, they should have permission to take part in an extracurricular activity.Some companies that have flexibility at holiday time give staffers an afternoon of their choosing off. Employees will consider that time to be a real gift — and knowing they’ll have a little free time may help them stay focused the rest of the holiday season._____For more small business news, insights and inspiration, sign up for our free weekly newsletter here: http://discover.ap.org/ssb_____Follow Joyce Rosenberg at www.twitter.com/JoyceMRosenberg . Her work can be found here: https://apnews.com/search/joyce%20rosenbergJoyce M. Rosenberg, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Pilots struggled to control plane that crashed in Indonesia

first_imgLion Air pilots struggled to maintain control of their Boeing jet as an automatic safety system in the Boeing jet repeatedly pushed the plane’s nose down, according to a draft of a preliminary report by Indonesian officials who are looking into last month’s deadly crash.The investigators are focusing on whether faulty information from sensors led the plane’s system to force the nose down.Indonesian authorities are expected to issue a report Wednesday, although it is unclear whether they will offer a probable cause for the Oct. 29 crash. The new Boeing 737 MAX 8 plunged into the Java Sea, killing all 189 people on board.Boeing did not immediately respond to an emailed request for comment.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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South Korea fines BMW 10 million over several engine fires

first_imgSEOUL, Korea, Republic Of — South Korea says it will fine BMW 11.2 billion won ($9.9 million) and file a criminal complaint against the company with state prosecutors over an allegedly botched response to dozens of engine fires reported in the country.South Korea’s Transport Ministry said Monday its investigation panel after a five-month review concluded that the German automaker deliberately tried to cover up technical problems and moved too slowly to recall vehicles after around 40 of its cars caught fire earlier this year.BMW recalled some 172,000 vehicles in July and October over the fires it has blamed on a faulty exhaust gas component. The company said there had been no reports of injuries linked to the fires.BMW’s South Korean unit didn’t immediately comment on the ministry’s announcement.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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