CHANNEL 44 NEWS: Holcomb Reacts to Indiana Electing Him Governor

first_imgHolcomb Reacts to Indiana Electing Him GovernorNOVEMBER 9TH, 2016 MATT PEAK CAMPAIGN 2016, INDIANA Indiana lives up to its reputation as a Red State, choosing to bring another Republican to the White House and the top seat in the state.Lieutenant Governor Eric Holcomb easily defeated Democrat John Gregg Tuesday night, to win the top seat in the HoosierState.Govenor-elect Holcomb has spent the majority of his life in public service.He has worked in Indiana politics for most of his adult life.Holcomb’s record includes various positions in the administration of former Governor Mitch Daniels and Senator Dan Coats.He was then elected Lieutentant Governor with now Vice-President Elect Mike Pence.At a news conference Wednesday, Holcomb expressed his gratitude to the voters.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Aces Tennis Drops Matches Against Murray State and Austin Peay

first_imgThe University of Evansville women’s tennis team (0-2, 0-0 MVC) opened up their 2016 season on Friday.  The Aces went to Murray State to take on the Racers and were defeated by a score of 7-0. They then followed that up with a match at Austin Peay.  The Governors were able to defeat the Aces 6-1.In the Aces 7-0 loss to Murray State, they saw strong showings from some of the Aces new players.  In Marine Darzyan’s loss at flight three singles, she fought hard despite losing by a score of 7-6 (10-3), 6-1.  Junior transfer Katie Delgado also had a strong showing at flight four singles losing her match by a score of 6-4, 6-7 (6-10), 10-6Even though the Aces were not able to grab the doubles point from the Racers, they were able to get a victory at flight two doubles.  Kennedy Craig and Katie Delgado were able to grab a victory over Amina Hadzic and Megan Blue by a score of 7-6 (7-5).In singles play against Austin Peay, Kennedy Craig was able to get her first win of the season at flight six singles.  Craig defeated Isabela Jovanovic by a score of 6-3, 6-2.  Marina Moreno and Andjela Brguljan were also able to pick up a victory at flight three doubles.  They managed to defeat Hannah Tatlock and Claudi Yanes Garcia by a score of 6-4. The Aces will wrap up their weekend tomorrow when they head to Southern Illinois Edwardsville.  They will square off with the Cougars starting at 2:00 p.m. CST. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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“READERS FORUM” FEBRUARY 11, 2018

first_imgIf you would like to advertise on the CCO please contact us [email protected] EDITOR’S FOOTNOTE:  Any comments posted by our readers in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City-County Observer or our advertisers.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare  Todays “Readers Poll” question is: Do you feel that the Evansville City Council should resend the “3-Minutes Governmental Censorship” speaking rule? Please take time and read our articles entitled “STATEHOUSE Files, CHANNEL 44 NEWS, LAW ENFORCEMENT, READERS POLL, BIRTHDAYS, HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS”.  You now are able to subscribe to get the CCO daily.center_img WHATS ON YOUR MIND TODAY?We hope that today’s “Readers Forum” will provoke honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way? HERE IS WHATS ON OUR MIND TODAY: The attached cartoon ask the question why are our political parties blaming each other for the problems in Washinton?  Why do you think they are doing this?last_img read more

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Drilling down on corruption

first_imgWhen Harvard Law School (HLS) Professor Lawrence Lessig was named director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics in 2008, he said he would create a limited-time project to research the problem of institutional corruption in the United States. He launched that project, the Edmund J. Safra Research Lab, in 2010, as a five-year effort to study the issue and come up with tools to understand it and respond to it better.On Friday and Saturday, a two-day conference called “Ending Institutional Corruption” will mark the end of that project, with dozens of speakers from academia, law, government, media, mind sciences, and citizen groups discussing the topic. The conference is free and open to the public, but registration is required.In addition to concluding the lab, Lessig is stepping down as the center’s director. (He will be succeeded by Danielle S. Allen, who has been appointed to the Faculty of Arts and Sciences as a professor in the Government Department.) Lessig, author of the 2012 book “Republic, Lost,” which addressed congressional corruption, will continue teaching at HLS as the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership.He also will remain active in the Mayday PAC, which he launched last year with the goal of reducing money’s influence on politics and government. Harvard Law Today spoke with Lessig recently about the lab and his future plans.HARVARD LAW TODAY: What were your specific goals when you set up the lab?LESSIG: I think the most important goal was to create an awareness of the kind of corruption that people are likely to miss or not think of as corruption. You can have an institution filled with totally non-corrupt people, but the institution itself has become corrupted because it’s opened itself to inferences that undermine its purpose or undermine the public trust in the institution. That’s the dynamic of corruption we’re trying to make salient, and to think about in a wide range of contexts, from the academy to scientific research, to the way courts function, to the way Congress functions, to any institution in principle that could be subject to this kind of corruption. We’re trying to find a way to understand it and respond to it.HARVARD LAW TODAY: Was the creation of the lab connected to the work you were doing in researching and writing “Republic, Lost”?LESSIG: I think of the lab as applying the problem that I wrote about with Congress to a wide range of institutions. Congress, I think, is a paradigmatic example of a corrupted institution, in the sense that it’s not necessarily filled with any criminals, but it’s become so focused on the objective of raising money to fund its campaigns that that dependency conflicts with the intended dependence — on people generally, and not on the funders of campaigns. That’s the dynamic I call dependence corruption, which is a perfect instance of this example of institutional corruption more generally.HARVARD LAW TODAY: To what extent do you think you’ve been successful in raising this awareness?LESSIG: It’s been incredibly successful in giving people an idea of this different sense of corruption and opening up a bunch of different research around it. Also, I think it’s been successful in just offering a vocabulary that has given people a way to talk about this without making it personal. If you talk about corruption, people’s immediate reaction is, “I’m not corrupt,” and the response should be, “I’m not talking about you; I’m talking about this institution and the way this institution is being defeated in its objectives.” I think that has turned out to be a really powerful way to think about a bunch of different institutions and the problems they face.HARVARD LAW TODAY: What’s your assessment of Mayday PAC after its first year of operation?LESSIG: Mayday PAC was an experiment, and remains an experiment, about ways that we can intervene to bring about a change in Congress to address this issue. We did one version of that experiment last year, and we’re launching another one this May 1 and will continue to experiment with ways until we find one that works.We were involved in eight races [in the 2014 mid-term elections], successful only in two. We were testing whether we could make this issue salient in the context of a partisan election. We could see a move to the ball, that people were much more focused on this issue than they were in other districts, but not enough to change things in a partisan fight. So that sent us back to thinking about other ways to address this issue.HARVARD LAW TODAY: So what happens May 1?LESSIG: We’re basically engaged in a pretty massive citizen lobby campaign to recruit members [of Congress] to co-sponsor reform. So it’s not about engaging political campaigns; it’s about trying to close the gap between the majority and the number who are committed to reform. The idea is that makes it easier to imagine actually winning when it comes to 2016.HARVARD LAW TODAY: Do you have any more books in the works?LESSIG: I gave a series of lectures at the University of Chicago last year that were on the subject of institutional corruption. The title was “America: Compromised,” and I’m publishing a book of those at the end of the summer. And there’s a version two of “Republic, Lost,” that will be coming out in January.last_img read more

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SMC Madeleva Lecture promotes religious dialogue

first_imgMonica Villagomez Mendez SMC President Carol Ann Mooney speaks at the annual Madeleva Lecture in Carroll Auditorium, examining the importance of interfaith conversations.Sr. Eva Mary Hooker, professor of English at Saint Mary’s, began the night reading two original poems. The first was based on an image she saw in an illustrated bible, where lines of scripture were being pictorially hoisted into place with a bumblebee and pulley, and the other poem was inspired by the line of sycamores lining the Avenue, she said.“I want tonight to celebrate in poetic image the mission of this college and the sisters who have worked here and the land upon which it stands,” she said. “We have all built together a place in which we seek wisdom.”Following the poetry reading, Marianne Farina, a professor of philosophy and theology at Graduate Theological Union in Berkley, California, spoke on “Sacred Conversations and the Evolution of Dialogue.”Mutual understanding and enrichment comes from sacred conversations, as such dialogue helps one appreciate the holiness of religions and cultures, she said.“Sacred conversations contribute to a deep theology, which like deep ecology contemplates the interconnectedness of all the cosmos,” Farina said. “This deep theology evinces an evolutionary consciousness skilled at holding it in esteem, the unenthused complex and enthused connection that exist between all living beings and the goodness God has ordained for each.”These conversations are opportunities for communication with self, God and others, Farina said. This idea is shared between Christian and Islamic traditions.“For as the sacred texts of Christians and Muslims proclaim, ‘God spoke and creation came to existence.’ These texts also tell of God’s continuing communication with nature in ways that foster a deep interiority in our encounters with cultures and religions,” she said.Farina said she had a religious experience of her own when providing cyclone relief efforts for an island off Bangladesh. The island population heard another storm was coming, and Farina spent the night of the scheduled storm in the second story of a building with numerous other women and children, many of whom were Muslim.Farina said the eye of the storm spared the island and very few were harmed. She noticed the Muslim women never stopped praying that night, and asked why the following morning.“Over a simple breakfast we had the chance to share our experiences of that fearful night,” she said. “They remained in the prayer circle because if that night was to be their last, they wanted to meet God together as a community uttering God’s own words on their lips. At that moment and in their telling, I gained insight.”Farina said dialogue and communication are important and evolutionary when they enter into the depth of shared existence in God. This movement is not linear, but rather a discovery of God’s presence in everything, she said.“Sacred conversation assists our entry into this depth, where we experience spiritual power,” she said.The values of humility and hospitality are essential to inter-religious dialogue because humility affirms a status as situated beings, and hospitality makes people come to terms with traditional differences in a way that opens up to self-knowledge and new insights, she said.“Whether we are engaged in dialogue or academic study, conversations focused on deep listening and the movements of the spirit are critical to developing scholarship and pastoral leadership responsive to today’s reality,” she said. “One example of such efforts in the story of Holy Cross. … Thus, the Holy Cross apostolic charism based on a spirit of union, and a gift of hope embodies the spirituality of dialogue.”The response by Sisters of the Holy Cross in Bangladesh is an example of the way mission and dialogue crosses numerous boundaries, she said.“Through [sacred conversations], we stand in solidarity with all others filled with hope, especially at the foot of the cross, bearing witness to … a future larger than ourselves,” she said.Asma Afsaruddin, a professor in the department of near Eastern languages and cultures at Indiana University, said she has met Farina multiple times at various symposiums. Afsaruddin responded to Farina’s talk and said she appreciated Farina’s passion for open interfaith dialogue.“Change is to be affected first internally in the individual before any meaningful external change can take root,” Afsaruddin said. “The most important site for bringing out genuine individual change, followed by social change, is clearly the human heart. Transformation of the human heart occurs by making it receptive to God’s will and becoming filled with God consciousness,” she said.Both Christian and Muslim traditions emphasize internal transformation and reconciliation with the creator and created beings to live an open life which can develop profound self-knowledge, she said.“It is fitting that Marianne should end her inspirational talk by emphasizing hope, to which God calls us to bear witness,” she said. “Both Christianity and Islam are founded on hope. The Quran and the Bible assure us that we must never despair of God’s love and solicitude for us and never lose faith in the ultimate goodness of human beings.”Afsaruddin said she agreed with Farina that humility and hospitality are necessary for sacred conversations and inter-religious dialogue, because these conversations allow people from different traditions to celebrate interconnectedness and common responsibilities to promote what is good.“Sacred conversations help to keep this compact among ourselves alive and relevant,” she said. “And most importantly of all, these sacred conversations help us to push back against other profane conversations that seek to divide and form hatred, of which unfortunately, as we know, there has been way too much lately.”Tags: Madeleva Lecture, religion, Sisters of Holy Cross, Theology Saint Mary’s Center for Spirituality hosted the 31st annual Madeleva Lecture on Thursday, honoring the 175th anniversary of the foundation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross. The event featured three keynote speakers, all women scholars, to discuss religious dialogue.last_img read more

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The IAAFA: My Story

first_imgI am a Brazilian Air Force lieutenant colonel and pilot, and the first officer from my country to serve as a guest instructor at the Inter-American Air Forces Academy (IAAFA). I’ve had two years of very noteworthy experiences; above all, living with students from the Inter-American Squadron Officer School (ISOS) program. In this program, officials from all over the American continent graduate with a greater ability to serve their country and with an enhanced perspective on being outstanding leaders all throughout their career. As the instructor for such a program, I have been able to directly contribute to the professional development of 43 officials from six countries in Latin America, and 20 officials from the United States. My inspiration for this work has come from two of Brazil’s notable sons and heroes: Ambassador Joaquim Nabuco and Air Force General Casimiro Montenegro. Like me, Brazilian Air Force General Casimiro Montenegro was also a pilot. He founded the Aeronautics Institute of Technology and the Aerospace Technical Center in the 40s and 50s, inspired by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. EMBRAER, the third largest airplane manufacturer in the world, would eventually evolve from these technical facilities. On Veterans Day, I was at Dolph Briscoe Middle School in San Antonio, Texas, where my son is in seventh grade. I would be speaking about joint operations between Brazil and the United States during the Italian Campaign in World War II. I had prepared a presentation with slides and some footage from a movie on the First Fighter Squadron of the Brazilian Air Force, “Senta a Pua”. Thanks to its specialized focus on technical training and professionalism over the course of seven decades, the IAAFA is always invited to showcase its successes in the Building Partner Aviation Capacity Course, or BPACC, at Hurlburt Field Air Force Base in Florida. As a representative of this academy on three occasions, I’ve spoken to dozens of officials from four different continents to promote the cause of harmony and cooperation among nations. Thanks to its specialized focus on technical training and professionalism over the course of seven decades, the IAAFA is always invited to showcase its successes in the Building Partner Aviation Capacity Course, or BPACC, at Hurlburt Field Air Force Base in Florida. As a representative of this academy on three occasions, I’ve spoken to dozens of officials from four different continents to promote the cause of harmony and cooperation among nations. Both men have planted seeds as well as dreams, and have harvested accomplishments of national and international importance that have [always] been based upon a fruitful relationship between Brazil and the United States. These achievements have been signed and sealed in the belief that working with these two giants throughout history has always resulted in peace, stability, progress, freedom, and justice for the American continent and the whole world. On Veterans Day, I was at Dolph Briscoe Middle School in San Antonio, Texas, where my son is in seventh grade. I would be speaking about joint operations between Brazil and the United States during the Italian Campaign in World War II. I had prepared a presentation with slides and some footage from a movie on the First Fighter Squadron of the Brazilian Air Force, “Senta a Pua”. During a break between presentations, I was chatting with one of the teachers from the school. She said that Veterans Day was particularly special to her because of her father’s legacy. He had been a veteran pilot who had participated in the Hump Operation during World War II! I would like to highlight that as part of my work at IAAFA, I was responsible for translating texts and lessons from English to Spanish that would serve as supplemental reading material for ISOS students. One of these texts was very special to me because it was the powerful story of the Hump Airlift Operation, which took place during the Second World War under General Tunner. This can be directly attributed to the IAAFA, its 71 years in existence, and its over 44,000 graduates from every country in the Americas. Likewise, the impact of programs like the ISOS goes well beyond the classroom. I still receive messages from a student who works directly in a combat zone in his particular country and fights drug traffickers. This is proof that the lessons he learned at the IAAFA are being implemented to keep the peace, to ensure public order, and to secure victory for legal forces that battle against the sowers of chaos and misery. I am a Brazilian Air Force lieutenant colonel and pilot, and the first officer from my country to serve as a guest instructor at the Inter-American Air Forces Academy (IAAFA). I’ve had two years of very noteworthy experiences; above all, living with students from the Inter-American Squadron Officer School (ISOS) program. In this program, officials from all over the American continent graduate with a greater ability to serve their country and with an enhanced perspective on being outstanding leaders all throughout their career. As the instructor for such a program, I have been able to directly contribute to the professional development of 43 officials from six countries in Latin America, and 20 officials from the United States. My inspiration for this work has come from two of Brazil’s notable sons and heroes: Ambassador Joaquim Nabuco and Air Force General Casimiro Montenegro. Joaquim Nabuco, a native of the state of Pernambuco, like I am, was Brazil’s ambassador to the United States from 1905 to 1910. In that capacity, he was an ardent supporter of inter-Americanism, which is why he eventually came to preside over the 1906 Pan-American Conference, the seed that would decades later sprout into the creation of the Organization of American States. Like me, Brazilian Air Force General Casimiro Montenegro was also a pilot. He founded the Aeronautics Institute of Technology and the Aerospace Technical Center in the 40s and 50s, inspired by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. EMBRAER, the third largest airplane manufacturer in the world, would eventually evolve from these technical facilities. This can be directly attributed to the IAAFA, its 71 years in existence, and its over 44,000 graduates from every country in the Americas. Likewise, the impact of programs like the ISOS goes well beyond the classroom. I still receive messages from a student who works directly in a combat zone in his particular country and fights drug traffickers. This is proof that the lessons he learned at the IAAFA are being implemented to keep the peace, to ensure public order, and to secure victory for legal forces that battle against the sowers of chaos and misery. By Dialogo April 28, 2015 My main point on such occasions is very simple and direct: Wholly echoing the strategic communication of IAAFA, I inform people that, through training, education, and the exchange of life experiences, we are establishing lasting ties and links between our forces and our countries. Joaquim Nabuco, a native of the state of Pernambuco, like I am, was Brazil’s ambassador to the United States from 1905 to 1910. In that capacity, he was an ardent supporter of inter-Americanism, which is why he eventually came to preside over the 1906 Pan-American Conference, the seed that would decades later sprout into the creation of the Organization of American States. Each student receives one little sunflower seed protected inside a tiny glass box. I end each course as an instructor, session after session, with this symbolic gift. I talk about the importance, the privilege, and the responsibility of leadership: sowing seeds. I talk about the sunflower in particular: it doesn’t matter how dark the skies are, this flower understands that there is a sun that never stops shining. Both men have planted seeds as well as dreams, and have harvested accomplishments of national and international importance that have [always] been based upon a fruitful relationship between Brazil and the United States. These achievements have been signed and sealed in the belief that working with these two giants throughout history has always resulted in peace, stability, progress, freedom, and justice for the American continent and the whole world. That was a memorable day for me. And that’s how it’s been over the last two years. Therefore, I extend my gratitude to Brazil, to the Brazilian Air Force, to the United States, the U. S. Air Force and the IAAFA: gratitude for the opportunity to serve my country by serving the American continent, which contributes to the cause of inter-Americanism, because our capacity for dialogue, respect, and cooperation grows in direct proportion to the liberty, security, and progress in our nations. Each student receives one little sunflower seed protected inside a tiny glass box. I end each course as an instructor, session after session, with this symbolic gift. I talk about the importance, the privilege, and the responsibility of leadership: sowing seeds. I talk about the sunflower in particular: it doesn’t matter how dark the skies are, this flower understands that there is a sun that never stops shining. That was a memorable day for me. And that’s how it’s been over the last two years. Therefore, I extend my gratitude to Brazil, to the Brazilian Air Force, to the United States, the U. S. Air Force and the IAAFA: gratitude for the opportunity to serve my country by serving the American continent, which contributes to the cause of inter-Americanism, because our capacity for dialogue, respect, and cooperation grows in direct proportion to the liberty, security, and progress in our nations. I would like to highlight that as part of my work at IAAFA, I was responsible for translating texts and lessons from English to Spanish that would serve as supplemental reading material for ISOS students. One of these texts was very special to me because it was the powerful story of the Hump Airlift Operation, which took place during the Second World War under General Tunner. Just like a sunflower seed, this is one tiny grain of an idea that deserves to be sown throughout the Americas. During a break between presentations, I was chatting with one of the teachers from the school. She said that Veterans Day was particularly special to her because of her father’s legacy. He had been a veteran pilot who had participated in the Hump Operation during World War II! My main point on such occasions is very simple and direct: Wholly echoing the strategic communication of IAAFA, I inform people that, through training, education, and the exchange of life experiences, we are establishing lasting ties and links between our forces and our countries. Just like a sunflower seed, this is one tiny grain of an idea that deserves to be sown throughout the Americas.last_img read more

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New feature on the Foundation’s interactive Impact Map

first_imgAt the beginning of the year, we debuted an Impact Map to highlight the Foundation’s programs, projects, and Credit Union Development Educators (CUDEs) in each state.  The Impact Map displays to credit unions and credit union professionals what their state is involved in when it comes to Foundation programs and initiatives, such as Biz Kid$, Experiential Learning programs, Non-Prime Auto Lending, Development Education (DE) projects and participants, and more.We have just released the second phase of the Impact Map, which is a “by program” feature to offer a different way to showcase the impact we are having across the United States. When viewing our Impact Map, you can now choose which way you would like to view how we are making a difference – either by state or by program.The “Browse by program” feature provides an interactive way to see which states are using specific Foundation programs, grants, or training’s.  For example, if a credit union organization wanted to see which states have participated in the Enhanced FiCEP Program, they could click “Financial Counseling” on the right, and see the highlighted states on the map.  Users can also click the “read more” below the map to learn more information about Financial Counseling. continue reading » 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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12-year-old infected with coronavirus dies in Belgium

first_imgNo other details were given about her case, including whether she had any other underlying health problems.It was the first death of a child in the coronavirus crisis in Belgium, which has now recorded a total 705 deaths from the disease it causes, according to the latest official toll.Last week, France reported the death of a 16-year-old girl from coronavirus in the greater Paris region.Although serious COVID-19 infections are uncommon among the young, some exceptional cases have been taken to hospital intensive-care wards, as US health authorities have pointed out. Belgium’s toll on Tuesday represented a jump of nearly 200 fatalities from that given the previous day, which stood at 513.It comprised 98 deaths recorded in the preceding 24-hour period, plus another 94 deaths over previous days but which had not been counted in the national tally, Andre said.The small EU country, with a population of 11.4 million, now has 12,775 cases of persons tested positive for COVID-19, of whom 4,920 have been hospitalized, including 1,021 in intensive care.Hospitals in Brussels and in two provinces, in the north and the west, are now confronted with “a more complicated situation” as beds fill up, Andre said. Topics :center_img A 12-year-old girl confirmed infected with COVID-19 has died in Belgium, health officials said Tuesday.Fatality at such a young age “is a very rare occurrence,” said government spokesman Dr Emmanuel Andre, adding that her death “shook us”.The girl had had a fever for three days before her death, and tested positive for COVID-19, said another spokesman, Steven Van Gucht.last_img read more

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IMO Adopts Safety Amendments for Passenger Ships

first_imgIMO’s Marine Safety Committee (MSC) has adopted revised safety requirements for passenger vessels in the event of flooding caused by an incident.The revisions to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) chapter II-1, relating to subdivision and damage stability, follow a substantive review of SOLAS chapter II-1, focusing in particular on passenger ships.As a basis, these changes used a series of EU and EMSA funded cooperative research projects conducted by academics, shipyards, ship operators, owners, classification societies and ship design consultants over several decades.Additionally, the review has taken into account recommendations made following the investigation into the 2012 Costa Concordia incident.The amendments raise the ‘required index R’, the damage stability requirement representing the ship’s capability to remain stable and afloat in the event of flooding after a collision. The requirement is based on a probabilistic damage stability methodology for passenger ships that was developed in the partially EU funded research project HARDER and mandated in SOLAS2009.The revised requirements were a part of a list of amendments set for adoption by IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) which meets from 7-16 June.last_img read more

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Duda OKs millions of dollars for public media

first_imgDUDA. NEWS.YAHOO.COM His decision was closely watched givenhow politically charged the issue of public media has become in Poland. Thepolitical opposition had called for the money to instead be used for cancertreatment. President Andrzej Duda, who hails fromthe ruling Law and Justice party, signed the funding bill late Friday as hecampaigns for a second five-year term in a May election. WARSAW – Poland’s president has signed abill earmarking nearly 2 billion zlotys ($510 million) to fund publictelevision and radio, broadcast outlets that have become mouthpieces for thecountry’s right-wing government and given the president positive coverage as hecampaigns for reelection. Duda said he had doubts about signingthe legislation approved by parliament into law. In doing so, he allowed alarge injection of money to go into broadcasters that were already helping hiscampaign.(AP)last_img read more

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