Indian election produces shock results

first_imgAfter a month of polling, voting has finally closed in India’s general election. It was predicted that the Prime Minister’s Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) had failed to secure an overall majority. In the world’s largest democracy, over 600 million adults had the right to vote in the election, in which over forty parties were represented. The BJP had been widely expected to win the election relatively easily. Their main threat was the Congress Alliance, which governed India for its first 50 years of independence, led by Sonia Gandhi. Two Communist parties have also polled well. The main issue in the election has been the economy. The BJP had to abandon their ‘India Shining’ slogan in the campaign following harsh criticism. The party needs to gain 272 seats for an overall majority in Parliament. Current polls indicate that it has won between 240 and 280 seats. Turnout was less than 60%.ARCHIVE: 2nd week TT 2004last_img read more

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Michele Young: at a glance

first_imgJob history: Young joined BB’s in 2005, during which time the number of cafés has grown from 90 to 179. Prior to that, she spent 12 years working in foodservice and retail marketing and international brand development, 10 as marketing manager (Europe and the Middle East) for Burger King, and, latterly, two as marketing director for Greggs.Top tip to new suppliers: “Samples? We get plenty and, frankly, we just don’t need them.”Favourite product: Sticky Toffee Muffin, washed down with a skinniccino.Outside interests: A foodie at heart, Young spends her free time looking around local food fairs in the Chilterns and regularly eating out at restaurants.Email: [email protected]last_img read more

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News story: Meeting of the Australia-UK Trade Working Group

first_imgThey included representatives from a wide range of UK and Australian government departments.The Trade Working Group continued to build momentum towards the shared commitment to begin bilateral FTA negotiations once the UK leaves the European Union.Discussions covered a range of topics to help build a shared understanding of both countries’ approaches and ambitions for the future bilateral trade and investment relationship.The Trade Working Group also discussed broader trade policy issues of mutual interest, including World Trade Organization processes and the wider regional and plurilateral trade landscape.The Trade Working Group reflects a strong political commitment by Australia and the UK to take a leadership role in the global rules-based multilateral trading system. the UK’s Department for International Trade (DIT) Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) Hon Steven Ciobo MP, Australia’s Minister for Trade, Tourism, and Investment Rt Hon Dr Liam Fox MP, the United Kingdom’s Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade The meeting brought together senior officials to identify practical steps Australia and the UK can take to deepen their existing trade and investment relationship.The delegations were led by officials from: The Australia-UK Trade Working Group met in Canberra on 19 to 20 April 2018.It was the third meeting of the Trade Working Group since it was established in September 2016 by the:last_img read more

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‘A Benefit For Creative Music Studio’ With Oteil Burbridge, Joe Russo, Cyro Baptista, More Announces Livestream

first_imgTonight, a very special Benefit for Creative Music Studio event is going down at the Brooklyn Bowl.The New York City benefit has tapped a star-studded lineup including Billy Martin, Cyro Baptista, Dave Harrington, Fay Victor, Ingrid Sertso, Joe Russo, Jonathan Goldberger, Karl Berger, Ken Filiano, Marc Ribot, Marshall Allen, Oteil Burbridge, Peter Apfelbaum, Robert Walter, Steven Bernstein, and Stuart Bogie. Without a doubt, tonight will be special.While tickets are still available here, with proceeds going to benefit the Creative Music Foundation, Relix is offering a live stream for those unable to attend the concert. To join the “couch tour” party, click here.last_img read more

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‘Desperate but not hopeless times’

first_imgThe election of Donald Trump as U.S. president could add to the turbulence Europe is already experiencing from its persistent debt crisis, the rise of nationalist political parties, and Britain’s decision to leave the European Union, analysts told a Harvard conference.At the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies’ annual Summit on the Future of Europe on Monday, speakers agreed there are no easy solutions to the upheavals that have buffeted the continent’s economy and raised concerns about the survival of its democratic traditions. The outcome of the U.S. elections adds to the uncertainty.“These are desperate but not hopeless times,” said Charles Maier, the Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History at Harvard, alluding to Trump’s election and the overall rise of populism both in Europe and in the United States.“Unfortunately, we are still in the midst of the most serious crisis in the history of European integration,” said Jeffry Frieden, professor of government, noting that the “European Union and the Eurozone in particular is still in the grips of a devastating debt crisis with extraordinarily sweeping economic and political implications.”But while differing on the best approach, speakers said there are strategies that European leaders can follow to ease the crisis atmosphere.The daylong event featured sessions on European democracy, the Eurozone crisis, security and foreign policy challenges, and the future of the European Union, along with a keynote address by European Commissioner Pierre Moscovici.Pippa Norris, the Paul F. McGuire Lecturer in Comparative Politics at the Kennedy School of Government, said rising populism is leading to a shift from the traditional left-right political division to a “new cleavage” separating people with cosmopolitan, liberal attitudes from those who are anti-establishment.Norris argued that the populist surge in Europe and the United States is driven primarily by a cultural backlash, observing that as progressive values have grown since the 1960s, “Many groups have been left off, and in particular the older generation rejects these values and feels that their values are now under threat.”She added, “It’s a threat to democracy and democratic promotion around the world.”Peter A. Hall, Krupp Professor of European Studies and resident faculty at CES, and Dante Roscini, professor of management practice at HBS and faculty associate, joined in the discussion. Photo by David Elmes/Minda de Gunzburg Center for European StudiesJoseph H.H. Weiler, former president of the European University Institute, said there has been an ongoing democratic crisis, stemming from the fact that the growth of the EU’s powers and functions have far outpaced that of its democratic institutions. European citizens do not have the feeling, essential to a democracy, that they can influence government, he said.“The big debate about austerity and growth doesn’t get processed through elections to the European Parliament,” he said.Daniel Ziblatt, professor of government at Harvard, said there are warning signs that Europe is heading for a crisis in democracy. He cited the rise of far-right political parties, a trend he believes traditional center-right parties are best suited to manage.“A well-organized constitutional right is able to contain the far right within its ranks,” he said.Wolfgang Merkel, director of the Democracy and Democratization Research Unit at the Berlin Social Science Center and currently a fellow at the de Gunzburg center, cautioned against sweeping judgments on whether democracy is in crisis.He said studies show, for instance, a significant decline in public trust in elective government, but high trust for institutions such as the military, police, and the judiciary.Frieden said EU leaders have failed to take the steps needed to resolve the debt crisis.“The longer the member states of the Eurozone … delay a restructuring of these debts, the greater costs to overall growth in the area, the greater the political cost to every member state government, and the greater the political cost to the European Union,” he said.Peter A. Hall, Harvard’s Krupp Foundation Professor of European Studies, warned that in addition to its debt, banking, and growth crises, Europe faces a political one, with declining levels of trust in government and a shift away from mainstream politics. Hall argued that EU leaders worsened or caused the problem by seeking a “fuller fiscal or political union” in response to the Eurozone crisis, an approach that he said deprives national electorates of the sense that their governments are accountable.“The EU should be loosening rather than tightening its requirements on national governments,” he said.But Hans-Helmut Kotz, visiting professor of economics at Harvard, said one of the EU’s problems is that it has failed to coordinate its fiscal and monetary policies. “The upshot is that monetary policy and fiscal policy intersecting in Europe do not suffice to create a macro environment that could nurture and support growth,” he said.Christopher Smart, a senior fellow at the Kennedy School’s Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, said that while populism and nationalism are no doubt on the rise, broader economic and technological trends are driving the world closer together.He added that institutions, notably the European Central Bank, remain firmly in place to grapple with those forces.SaveSaveSaveSaveSavelast_img read more

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Data Protection is More Than an Insurance Policy – It’s an AI Must-Have

first_imgData is king.In a world reshaped by digital transformation, data has become an integral piece of the decision-making process within an organization. All business models today are built around data, enabling leaders to make big decisions to increase revenue, decrease cost, and reduce risk. However, too often organizations view the protection of that data as an overhead or an insurance policy, rarely ever looking at the data they’ve actually stored. That data has a lot of value in it that if accessed…could be a game changer when it comes to business insights and intelligence.Organizations need to start thinking about data management by considering the following questions:How accessible is your data?How likely is it that your data will survive multiple disasters?What meta-data do you need?How important is the privacy and security of your data?And of course, there are industry trends that will shape the way you think data management and protection.With Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning, risk and responsibility lead to big outcomes.Over 70 percent of enterprise companies are expected to leverage AI by the year 2021. Innovation in specialized hardware is accelerating deep learning capabilities in the data center, translating into business insights that drive growth through historical data that can now be derived from machine learning algorithms.Building AI models and instantiating them is a vital investment – which of course, comes with risk.  That data is incredibly valuable.  The reality is that at some point your valuable data may be lost, damaged, corrupted, or compromised – the equivalent of taking 500 of the smartest people at your company and having them disappear.Data protection, and the accessibility of that data, has become significantly more important (than ever) for the future of the data center – and everywhere it lives – including the cloud and at the edge. This is more than just an insurance policy – this is critical in ensuring your most valuable data assets are there when you need them to drive growth and a competitive market position.Making your data protection intelligent is complicated.Data protection today is a very complex task. There are a lot of manual configurations to consider, a need for specialized administrators, and an intense process for accessing historical data.Fast forward into the future: we would like to have a fully autonomous system that isn’t just storing data arbitrarily, but using compute capacity to gain insights and develop a model to create the brain for your business. This would instantiate data through which the algorithms, results, trends, and trained models could extract the most value. Think about what this could do!When you consider data protection – protecting and trusting where your data lands – it’s not just about making sure it is resilient. It’s about making sure that all that effort you expended to develop an AI learning system over an extended period of time – the code and the data – lands somewhere that it is actually protected. The system must be intelligent enough to know on which location to store the data, what meta-data you need to produce the data, and be able to predict possible data loss events and prepare for them in advance.  And intelligence drives simplicity.New storage technologies give data protection a boost. Most protection data is kept on spindles. As new media storage is becoming cheaper, high capacity QLC flash devices continue to expand in capacity without increasing the price. Arriving to the market, these systems are able to store secondary data (i.e. the backup data) on a much faster storage device and still gain the price and efficiency of a data protection system.The future protection of storage will be integrated into an AI system and thus insights of past data will be available.Being able to gain insights directly from the secondary protection system will also allow reducing some of the load and capacity on the primary storage arrays, allowing a wider adoption of new storage technologies like storage class memory (SCM) for primary storage.It’s an AI, new application, multi-cloud, and IoT must have! As data becomes critical to the organization, a simplified, coherent data protection plan is required for new application development mechanisms too. Not only that, but more and more enterprises are moving to use hybrid cloud and multi-cloud strategies, meaning data not only resides on premise or on a single cloud, but rather on multiple different clouds. Over 20 percent of the enterprises believe that they will use more than five separate clouds in the future. This makes management protection of the data an even more complex task. But it also opens opportunities. In addition, the IoT devices that generate huge amounts of data pose a challenge for proper data management and protection strategies. I plan to explore all of this and more in future posts.As we can see, the value of business data paired with the reality of artificial intelligence has created a new world order. Our research shows that data protection initiatives were one of the most common initiatives undertaken by companies that are looking to transform and modernize their IT. The outcome? A robust, current environment adapted to keep up with the likes of the data generated by artificially intelligent infrastructure. Data protection is not merely an insurance policy. It’s a must-have to make big decisions and insights in order to stay competitive in this digital landscape.last_img read more

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Events celebrate Advent on campus

first_imgCampus Ministry will celebrate Advent by hosting a variety of events meant to encourage students to take time off during the pre-finals rush to prepare for Christmas. Kate Barrett, assistant director of undergraduate ministry, said she helps coordinate Advent events and prayer opportunities around campus that balance the Advent and the Christmas seasons. “Unfortunately, we’re never here for the Christmas season, except at the very end of it, when students return to campus after break,” Barrett said. “I try to help figure out ways to celebrate Christmas in the halls that allows students to enjoy all the warmth of Christmas while still respecting the beauty and enormity of the Advent season itself.” Barrett said a highlight of the scheduled events is Lessons and Carols next Sunday at 7:15 p.m. in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart. The Folk Choir, Liturgical Choir and Basilica Schola will perform Advent music, which will be supplemented by Scripture readings. “Lessons and Carols is a must-do event,” Barrett said. “[It] has a long tradition in the Church and at Notre Dame, so it’s long been an Advent tradition.” Other Advent events on campus include an RCIA Rite of Welcome at the 11:45 a.m. Basilica Mass on Sunday, a celebration of the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe in the Basilica on Dec. 12 at 5:15 p.m. and Advent Vespers in the Basilica’s Lady Chapel on Dec. 15 at 7 p.m. One-time events that celebrate the season are most effective on a busy college campus, Barrett said. “It’s meant to be a peaceful, reflective season, anyway, so there’s no need to add a lot of action and events,” Barrett said. “One great way to celebrate Advent is just to spend some quiet time each day with the daily Gospel readings. We have a little resource called the Little Blue Book that has daily reflections for Advent in it.” The Little Blue Book is available in the Campus Ministry office in Coleman-Morse Center, and Barrett said more prayer and reflection resources are available on the Campus Ministry website. Barrett said taking time to celebrate Advent is important, especially in the midst of final exams.  “When you think you’re too stressed to stop and pray, you should stop and pray,” Barrett said. “So many forces encourage us to jump right to Christmas, but Advent offers us the opportunity to slow down, to reflect on how we prepare our hearts for anything, but in this case, specifically for the coming of Christ into our world. “Advent also helps us keep Christmas in perspective by reminding us that – as Jesus did – what we really have to offer each other is ourselves, not all the stuff that the stores and websites want us to buy.” Information about events occurring during Advent is available on the Campus Ministry website, as well as its Twitter feed, Facebook page and app.   Contact Nicole McAlee at [email protected]last_img read more

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School of Rock Celebrates 500 Broadway Performances

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 20, 2019 Star Files School of Rock – The Musical What’s the best way to celebrate shredding hard on the Great White Way for 500 performances? A cupcake party, of course! That’s exactly what the Broadway company of School of Rock did on February 15. Stars Eric Petersen, Jenn Gambatese, Steven Booth, Becky Gulsvig and the epic kid band, including Rachel Katzke, Amadi Chapata, Gianna Harris, Olivia Chun, Chloe Bryan, Brandon Niederauer, Raghav Mehrotra and Terrence Bell, Jr., were on hand to enjoy cupcakes from BCakeNY during the sweet celebration. Check out Broadway.com’s hot shot of the event, then catch the musical at the Winter Garden Theatre! (P.S. It’s one of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s four musicals currently on Broadway; The Phantom of the Opera, Cats and Sunset Boulevard are also lighting up the Great White Way.) Becky Gulsvigcenter_img Related Shows View Comments ‘School of Rock”s Broadway company(Photo: Caitlin McNaney)last_img read more

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D.W. Brooks

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaInstead of pouring emergency relief money into Africa, Pedro A. Sanchez says that America needs to be teaching Africans how to be self-sustainable.Sanchez will share his ideas at this year’s D.W. Brooks Lecture at the University of Georgia as he speaks on “The African Green Revolution and the Millennium Villages Project.” The annual lecture and awards ceremony will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 3 in Masters Hall of the Georgia Center for Continuing Education.“Africa is hungry and Americans would like to help,” he said. “But we’ve been helping in the wrong way – by providing emergency food aid rather than enabling African farmers to produce more food.”Sanchez is the director of Tropical Agriculture at the Earth Institute at Columbia University in New York. He is also a research scholar for the International Research Institute for Climate Prediction and co-chair of the Millennium Project’s hunger task force. As a soil scientist at Columbia, he advises farmers in the west Kenyan village of Sauri, according to a New York Times article, on how to revive their badly damaged fields and how to plant trees as a way of fertilizing the soil for free, thus dramatically increasing their crop yields.The D.W. Brooks Lecture “audience should be thinking how individually and as UGA they could get involved,” Sanchez said.His talk will precede the presentation of this year’s D.W. Brooks Faculty Awards for Excellence winners. The awards are given annually to UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences faculty who excel in teaching, research, extension, public service and global programs.The awards were established in 1981 to recognize excellence in the CAES teaching program. In 1983, they expanded to include research, extension and county extension programs. An award for global programs was added in 1988 and is given in alternate years.The lecture and awards are named for the late D.W. Brooks, founder and chairman emeritus of Gold Kist, Inc. Brooks was an advisor to seven U.S. presidents on agriculture and trade issues. He also started Cotton States Mutual Insurance Companies in 1941 to provide farmers with insurance. The CAES sponsors the annual lecture series in his memory.last_img read more

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LARGELY UNDISCOVERED…CLARKSVILLE

first_imgNeed a great place to get away from the hustle & bustle? Well we have plenty of room for you to relax plus you’ll find plenty to enchant you here in Clarksville, Virginia. We’re known for our fishing tournaments and beautiful lakeside views, but that’s just the surface appeal of this area. Dive a little deeper, and you’ll find things to do and see that will delight every member of the family, no matter their age or interests. Looking for romantic getaway, a family vacation, great events, historic sites, you will find all that here, what you won’t see is bumper to bumper traffic.Need a great place to get away from the hustle & bustle? Well we have plenty of room for you to relax plus you’ll find plenty to enchant you here in Clarksville, Virginia. We’re known for our fishing tournaments and beautiful lakeside views, but that’s just the surface appeal of this area. Dive a little deeper, and you’ll find things to do and see that will delight every member of the family, no matter their age or interests. Looking for romantic getaway, a family vacation, great events, historic sites, you will find all that here, what you won’t see is bumper to bumper traffic.  Nestled on Bugg’s Island Lake (KERR LAKE) our lake holds the Virginia state and world record for the largest blue catfish catch, weighing in at 143 pounds. Clarksville also has been the premier location for nighttime fishing from a bridge and currently Clarksville is the nation’s only bridge location for hydro glow lights.Many visitors here have decided to stay, making the area’s main city of Clarksville a growing center for business and technology. We think that once you’ve seen what we have to offer, you will stay too! Your next adventure-At the Heart of It All: Clarksville  last_img read more

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