Assistant Professor – Pulmonary

first_imgDivision: Medicine (80001010)Department: Medicine – Pulmonary (90002367)Employment Duration: Full-timeBaylor College of Medicine and Department Summary:Baylor ( www.bcm.edu ) isrecognized as one of the nation’s premier academic health sciencecenters and is known for excellence in education, research, andhealthcare and community service. Located in the heart of theworld’s largest medical center ( Texas MedicalCenter ), Baylor is affiliated with multiple educational,healthcare and research affiliates ( Baylor Affiliates).SummaryThe Department of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care andSleep Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) in Houston,Texas looking for a faculty to join our academic program. We seek aclinician and clinical-educator at the level of Assistant Professorto join our expanding clinical practice. Baylor College of Medicinein Houston, TX is seeking an adult pulmonologist to participate inthe coordination and optimization of care for adult cystic fibrosis(CF) patients.The BCM Adult CF Center is one of the largest centers in thecountry and is the only accredited adult CF center in southernTexas, caring for 300 CF patients every year. Our multidisciplinaryteam has an active clinical trial enterprise participating innearly twenty ongoing clinical trials and is closely aligned withother departments integral to the care of our CF patients,including ENT, Endocrinology and Gastroenterology, amongothers.Job Responsibilities:Responsibilities will include inpatient and outpatient CFresponsibilities and general pulmonary practice at Baylor Collegeof Medicine St Luke’s Hospital.Job Qualifications:Education: M.D.Licensure: Licensed by the Texas Medical BoardBaylor College of Medicine is an Equal Opportunity/AffirmativeAction/Equal Access Employer.1154CA; CHlast_img read more

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WILLIAM HILL “SPORTSBOOK” TO PARTNER WITH TROPICANA EVANSVILLE

first_img William Hill is launching its 143rd U.S. Sportsbook at Tropicana Evansville, which is owned by Eldorado Resorts, Inc. (NASDAQ: ERI), in September, pending approval by the Indiana Gaming Commission. The Sportsbook, which is a remodel of the current 421 Lounge, is scheduled to open in time for football season and is the first Indiana sportsbook for William Hill.The state-of-the-art Sportsbook will feature a 16’ x 9’ ft. the video wall, ten 65-inch viewing monitors, and 12 odds boards which will provide sports fans with comfortable places to watch sports with friends and bet on the games.The William Hill “SportsBook” will integrate 421’s existing bar while re-imagining and transforming the lounge to create the ultimate sports betting experience for fans. The book will be located just off the casino floor, steps away from the entrance to the hotel and Downtown Evansville’s only 24-hour restaurant, The DELI.“We are excited to continue expanding our relationship with Eldorado Resorts and introducing William Hill to sports fans in Indiana,” said David Grolman, President of Retail Operations for William Hill US. “Tropicana Evansville is a great destination, nestled between Nashville, Louisville and St. Louis, and we look forward to serving guests with our 85 years of sports betting experience.”Glenn Carano, Senior Vice President of Operations, East Region at Eldorado Resorts, Inc. said, “We are delighted to have William Hill as the official sportsbook operator at Tropicana Evansville. They are a leader in the sports betting industry and bring years of experience with them. We have no doubt that William Hill’s industry-leading wagering menu and technology will enhance the guest experience which isalways the priority at all Eldorado Resorts properties across the country.”The “Sportsbook” will offer guests and bettors access to William Hill’s mobile app, kiosks, and InPlay wagering menu while they enjoy the casino’s world-class restaurants and entertainment.William Hill is currently hiring for more than a dozen positions for this location. Interested candidates (must be 21 years of age or older at the time of application) may apply at williamhill.us or email Senior Recruiter Josh Brady at [email protected] William HillWilliam Hill PLC is one of the world’s leading betting and gaming companies, employing over 16,000 people. Its origins are in the UK where it was founded in 1934, and where the company is listed on the London Stock Exchange.With headquarters in London and Leeds, it has a national presence of licensed betting offices in Great Britain and Northern Ireland and is one of the country’s leading online betting and gaming services. In 2012, it established William Hill US with a focus on retail and mobile operations in Nevada, which is now the largest sports betting business in the USA. William Hill US (www.williamhill.us) currently operates 113 race and sportsbooks in Nevada and the state’s leading mobile sports betting app.William Hill is operating in New Jersey at Monmouth Park Racetrack, Ocean Resort Casino, Tropicana Atlantic City, and online with the William Hill New Jersey sports betting app as well as in four casinos in Iowa and in West Virginia at Mountaineer Racetrack. William Hill is a licensed sports betting provider in numerous casinos in Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and New Mexico, and serves as the exclusive risk manager for the sports lottery in Delaware.William Hill has licensed operations in The Bahamas, Italy, Spain, and Sweden and serves online customers in the UK, Ireland and throughout the world from its digital hubs in Gibraltar and Malta.  In February 2019 it completed the acquisition of MRG Group acquiring the Mr. Green and Redbet brands and with it an expanded pan-European footprint in faster-growing online betting and gaming markets.About Tropicana EvansvilleTropicana Evansville is a multi-million dollar entertainment complex located on the scenic banks of the Ohio River in southwestern Indiana.  The single-level 24-hour casino encompasses 45,000 square feet of gaming space featuring over 1,100 slot games, over 30 table games, a dedicated Poker Room and a High Limit Room. Accommodations include a 243-room hotel tower and a 95-room boutique hotel. The property showcases four dining options, four bars, a conference center, riverfront event center, and a 1,660-vehicle attached parking garage.Must be 21. Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-9 WITH IT.For more information visit www.tropevansville.com FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare WILLIAM HILL “SPORTSBOOK” TO OPEN IN SEPTEMBER FOR FOOTBALL SEASON By: Ryan OakesLAS VEGAS (August 21, 2019)last_img read more

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YESTERYEAR-Bud’s Service Station by Pat Sides

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Bud’s Service Station was located at 1 Jefferson Avenue, where the street intersects with SE Second, a block south of the Alhambra Theater in the Haynie’s Corner district. This Mobilgas service station, designed in a quirky architectural style, was owned by Bud Johnson when it was photographed in 1950, shortly after it was built. It is now gone, but Evansville still has a few small service stations dating from this era, although they have been largely abandoned or were converted to other uses when larger “convenience stores” began to replace them.FOOTNOTES: We want to thank Patricia Sides, Archivist of Willard Library for contributing this picture that shall increase people’s awareness and appreciation of Evansville’s rich history. If you have any historical pictures of Vanderburgh County or Evansville please contact please contact Patricia Sides, Archivist Willard Library at 812) 425-4309, ext. 114 or e-mail her at www.willard.lib.in.us.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s Residence Hall Association introduces Navy Ball waiver outlining code of conduct

first_imgTickets for this year’s Navy Ball, scheduled for Nov. 15, went on sale in the Saint Mary’s Student Center on Tuesday. In an Oct. 11 email, the Residence Hall Student Association (RHA) announced it would not be hosting the annual fall formal, and will instead be collaborating with Student Government Association (SGA) to host the Navy Ball.The Navy Ball, a long-standing tradition born out of the rivalry between the Notre Dame and Navy football teams, brings Saint Mary’s students and Midshipmen together for a night of dancing after each game and is historically hosted by SGA, senior Grace Kelly, president of RHA, said.“It was a little bit of a new project for RHA to take on, but we’re really excited about it,” Kelly said.As the Navy Ball is normally hosted by SGA, Kelly said RHA had to adjust to juggling the schedules of two executive student boards in planning the function.“We had to start meeting with [SGA], in addition to meeting with our own RHA executives, and [have] our formal committee meet as well,” Kelly said. “So a lot more meetings started happening. A lot of text messages like ‘OK, can you meet this day? Can you meet that day? Something’s come up that we need to discuss to make sure that we’re on top of everything.’ So just a lot of meetings and collaboration.”Kelly said the groups worked closely with director of residence life Ariel Leary, dean of students Gloria Jenkins and representatives from the Office of Student Involvement.Jenkins was not available for comment.This year’s Navy Ball features several new changes, Kelly said, including an increased number of tickets available to both Saint Mary’s students, their guests and Navy Midshipmen.“We have 150 [tickets] set aside for the Midshipmen,” Kelly said. “I’m not entirely sure how many are coming. We have a contact with the Naval Academy, and we’re trying to figure out exactly how many of them are going to be coming. Obviously, they’re not going to be the football team that’s coming because they’re not going to be allowed to go out the night before the game.”After reevaluating the fire capacity for the event venue, RHA found it could host a greater crowd than in previous years, and moved to offer an increased number of tickets to the student body, Kelly said.“For Saint Mary’s students – I don’t have the exact number – but in the past, we’ve been able to have about 750 people for formal and it’s going to be at the Hilton Garden Inn,” Kelly said. “We reevaluated … and we have about at least 800 or 900 tickets for Saint Mary’s students.”Freshman Emily Bennett, who bought her Navy Ball ticket Tuesday, said she is glad the College is opening up the Navy Ball to more students.“I think it’s a good thing,” Bennett said. “So everyone can go instead of just like a certain group of people. It’s more open. And now I don’t really have to worry about not being able to go with my friends.”Kelly also said RHA is increasing security presence at this year’s Navy Ball, as well as adding more chaperones.“We are beefing it up a bit,” she said. “This year, we’re hiring more security. We’ve had students work in the past, and if another student is doing something that’s against the rules of formal, it’s not exactly fair to [the student workers] to be like, ‘Hey, you need to go talk to your peer and be like you can’t do that.’ So in addition to having chaperones, we’ve hired more security guards to just try and make it a safe event for everybody. And that way, everybody gets to have a really fun time.”The other big change being made to the Navy Ball is the waiver students are required to sign before registering for and attending the event, Kelly said. This waiver outlines the behavioral expectations of students who attend the dance, and will inform future formal decisions made by RHA and the Saint Mary’s administration, she said.“In the past, students haven’t been exactly clear on how the College wants to portray the rules or anything like that,” Kelly said. “So the waiver this year for us was a way to really get our point across to students that this is what the college expects of us. … We’re reevaluating formal, seeing how it should be changed to make it a better event for students.”Saint Mary’s students will be held accountable for the actions of any guests they bring to the Navy Ball, Kelly said, and all in attendance will be expected to act responsibly and maturely.“We’ve had guests in the past who have been acting immaturely,” Kelly said. “And so part of the thing with the waiver is that we are telling students you can’t control your date’s actions, but you are going to be held responsible if they do somehow cause damage to the venue or if they cause a big ruckus or something like that. So because you are bringing them and they are your guests, you are responsible for how they act.”The conduct of students attending this year’s Navy Ball will influence how Saint Mary’s will host formals in the future, Kelly said.“If students are very receptive to the waiver, and they just behave very well, they’re mature, then that is great evidence for the school that ‘you know what, this was a positive change and we can move forward,’” Kelly said. “But depending on how this Navy Ball does happen, it definitely plays a role into how the administration wants to continue forward with formal and how they want it to happen in the future.”Sophomore Sydney Hruskoci said she understands the need for a waiver outlining the rules of conduct, as more should be expected from college-aged students.“I mean, it’s a formal,” Hruskoci said. “So I feel like you know, it’s kind of understandable. Yes, of course people need to have fun; but at the same time, they can’t be stupid. So I understand. I get it.”Junior Elizabeth Day said she was a little surprised to learn that the usual fall formal would be replaced with this year’s Navy Ball.“I’m a little upset,” Day said. “But I’m excited to be able to go to Navy formal.”Day said she was never part of any misbehavior that may have prompted Saint Mary’s to reevaluate how it hosts its formals.“I do think that it’s a little extreme that we have to sign a waiver just to go to a dance,” Day said. “But I get it.”Tags: code of conduct, Formal, Midshipmen, navy ball, waiverlast_img read more

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Lesli Margherita Returns to Matilda’s Revolting Children

first_imgTaylor Trensch, Lesli Margherita and Gabriel Ebert in ‘Matilda'(Photo: Joan Marcus) Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 1, 2017 Matilda The Queen is back on the Main Stem being a little bit naughty! Original Great White Way cast member and legendary Broadway.com vlogger Lesli Margherita returns to Matilda on September 6. The Olivier winner takes over for Amy Spanger as Mrs. Wormwood in the musical, while Jennifer Blood, who played Miss Honey on the national tour, will also join the Broadway company on the same date, replacing Allison Case. The production is set to shutter on January 1, 2017 at the Shubert Theatre.Margherita won an Olivier Award for her performance in Zorro in the West End. Her additional credits include Man of La Mancha, Showboat, Little Shop of Horrors and Dames at Sea. Blood’s Broadway credits include Violet and A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder.Directed by Tony and Olivier Award winner Matthew Warchus, Matilda is the story of an extraordinary girl who dreams of a better life. Armed with a vivid imagination and a sharp mind, Matilda dares to take a stand and change her destiny. Based on the beloved Roald Dahl novel of the same name, the musical features a book by Dennis Kelly and music and lyrics by Tim Minchin.The cast currently additionally includes Bryce Ryness as Miss Trunchbull, Rick Holmes as Mr. Wormwood (to be replaced by John Sanders on September 13) and Natalie Venetia Belcon as Mrs. Phelps. Ava Briglia, Aviva Winick and Willow McCarthy share the title role.The Olivier-winning London production of Matilda continues to run at the West End’s Cambridge Theatre.center_img View Comments Star Files Lesli Margheritalast_img read more

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Governor Shumlin’s State of the State Address: ‘Vermont Strong’

first_imgVermont Governor Peter Shumlin stood before a joint assembly of the Vermont Legislature in the House chamber this afternoon and offered his second State of the State address. His speech focused heavily on the effects of Tropical Storm Irene and the rebuilding effort which followed the August 28 storm. “Vermont Strong” became a metaphor for the recovery effort and Shumlin used it frequently, not only in regards to the successful rebuilding of infrastructure after Irene, but for the community effort that will be required to overcome other issues the state and Legislature will face, namely the economic recovery and writing a balanced budget.The governor acknowledged Burlington businessman Antonio Pomerleau, who has given a million dollars to the recovery effort. Shumlin, ever the businessman himself, praised many businesses not only for their own contributions to the recovery, but also for their individual success during this economic downturn, now going into its fifth year. He singled out several manufacturers for their resiliency and growth. He ended the speech with, “Let’s get back to work.” State of the State AddressGovernor Peter ShumlinJanuary 5, 2012 Mr. President, Mr. Speaker, Mr. Chief Justice, Members of the General Assembly, distinguished guests, fellow Vermonters: Thank you. It’s been such a privilege to serve as Vermont’s governor over the past year. Our partnership of community, courage, and common purpose that has empowered us through the unprecedented challenges dumped upon us by Mother Nature, combined with our willingness to make the tough choices necessary to grow jobs and economic opportunities for all Vermonters, has made us stronger. I want to recognize a few of the thousands of Vermonters who have made us so proud in the last year, and serve as symbols of Vermont at its best. We are so grateful to the dedicated women and men of our armed forces, whose service both overseas and during the Irene recovery has been exemplary. Please join me in honoring our Vermont troops, led by Gen. Michael Dubie. The magnitude of devastation from Tropical Storm Irene astounded General Dubie and me as we landed in community after community in the days after the storm. I knew that we needed effective, experienced leaders to help us cut through bureaucracy and rebuild at breakneck speed as we raced winter weather. I am so grateful to our Irene Recovery Officer Neale Lunderville, who took a leave from his job to join our team in Vermont’s time of need. Neale, all Vermonters join me in thanking you for your selfless service to the state you love. This has been an especially tough year for Vermont’s local government leaders. I want to acknowledge four of our storm-tested, hard-working mayors: Thom Lauzon, Barre; Marty Manahan, St. Albans; Chris Louras, Rutland; Mary Hooper, Montpelier: please stand so we can acknowledge your service to Vermont. I also want to acknowledge an outstanding legal mind and a pioneer in civil rights who made history this year by joining the Vermont Supreme Court. Justice Robinson, thank you for your service to justice in Vermont. *** Today I report to you on the state of the greatest state in the nation, one that has demonstrated over the course of the past year what it means to be united as one community to overcome tragedy. In the wake of a deep recession, two spring storms, and a tropical storm that devastated our infrastructure and exacted an unimaginable toll on the lives of thousands of Vermonters, I can tell you without reservation or exaggeration: the state of our state is strong. Vermont strong! From Halifax to Hartford, Wilmington to Waterbury, Roxbury to Richmond, the hundreds of individual actions of bravery and courage in the days and months after Irene will be forever etched in my memory. I want to share one of them. Rutland Mayor Chris Louras, who like most local leaders was working long days without sleep after Irene, called me every few hours with progress updates on the unfolding tragedy ‘ the search for Mike Garofano and his son, who went missing during the storm. With Route 4 nothing but a streambed in sections where roadway once ran, I came in by National Guard helicopter to join Mayor Louras and give son Tommy Garofano a bear hug from all Vermonters. Tommy’s dad, Mike Sr., grew up in Rutland and went to work for the city for over 30 years, rising to become the manager of the water plant, a job to which he dedicated his life. Mike and his wife Sally had two sons ‘ Mike Jr., known also as Little Mike, and Tommy; Mike also had a son Robby. Robby lost his life in a tragic accident in 2010, and Little Mike and Tommy’s tight bond with their mom and dad helped them all in the face of such adversity. On the evening of Irene, with Mendon Brook raging, Mike and Little Mike braved through the storm to the water plant to check on the inlet valve that Mike had closed the previous day to make sure polluted water would not enter the city’s reservoir. It was a risk, but they were determined to protect Rutland’s water supply. With Mendon Brook carving craters where solid soil once stood, the banks gave way, sweeping them both away. Mike’s body was retrieved the next day, but the search for Little Mike went on for weeks. While Sally was comforted by family and friends, Tommy heroically joined the search and rescue effort, digging through mountains of Irene’s debris looking for his brother. Today on behalf of our state, we honor two Vermont heroes, Michael Garofano and Michael Garofano, Jr. with a promise that we will never forget. Joining us in the chamber are Sally and Tommy Garofano. To Sally and Tommy — and the families of the six other Vermonters who lost their lives as a result of Tropical Storm Irene — our admiration and support will never cease. Thank you. As Mayor Louras and I gave what comfort we could to Tommy on that day at Mendon Brook, something else happened that characterizes Vermont strong. With Route 4 shut down, and community after community isolated islands where roads and bridges once served, brothers John and Doug Casella had an idea. Doug said, ‘Governor, you get the Department of Motor Vehicles to lift the ban on hauling heavy equipment across what’s left of our roads and get us permission to retrieve some of the rock and gravel that Irene washed from our roads into our streams, and we’ll partner with other private contractors like Belden Company, Markowski Excavating, Mosher Excavating, Wilk Paving, the Agency of Transportation and the National Guard. We can have Route 4 open in three weeks.’ As soon as I got high enough in the chopper to actually have cell service in Vermont, I called Secretary Searles, Secretary Markowitz and Commissioner Ide, and within hours, our team applied Doug’s request, not just to Rutland, but to the whole state of Vermont. And guess what? Nine days later, Route 9 from Brattleboro to Wilmington to Bennington: Open. 18 days later, Route 4 from Woodstock to Rutland: Open. And today, all the roads destroyed by Irene: Open! Team Casella, Belden, Wilk, Mosher, Markowski are here today, and I would ask you to please stand. You represent the many Vermont construction companies who, along with AOT, the Vermont National Guard and Guard troops from around the country rebuilt us Vermont Strong, and Vermont honors you today. In this public/private partnership, with winter looming, we did it right, with Vermont ingenuity, fiscal prudence, and common sense. We rebuilt, for 35 cents on the dollar, bringing total estimated damage down to $250 million for state roads and infrastructure, and $140 million for town roads. Thanks to the skill of the best Congressional delegation in America, Senator Leahy, Senator Sanders and Congressman Welch, the Leahy amendment became law, ensuring that Vermont will get the federal aid we need in our time of need, reducing our projected cost to the General Fund to under $30 million. Please join me in recognizing the great work of Senator Patrick Leahy, Senator Bernie Sanders, and Congressman Peter Welch as well as our partners at FEMA. *** There are two Irene lessons that we must seize from our experience over the past four months. The first lesson is clear: if after Irene we can rebuild over 500 miles of damaged roads and 34 bridges in four months for a fraction of normal cost, with dwindling federal funds in our future, we must apply those lessons to maintaining and rebuilding Vermont’s aging transportation infrastructure from this point forward. We will build faster, smarter, and more economically. Instead of having state workers bunkered in their individual agencies, processing paper, we broke down the silos, forming a partnership between AOT, ANR, private contractors, and municipalities. Contracting procedures were modified; access to stone and gravel was expedited; dangerous debris was removed from brooks and streams as engineers worked together with environmental experts to get the job done. Projects that pre-Irene would have taken years got done in months; environmental quality was preserved; taxpayer dollars were saved; and roads and bridges were built to withstand the assault of extreme weather that looms even larger in our future. The second lesson comes from the remarkable tenacity of the hundreds of small businesses that were drowned in water and mud, putting hard working Vermonters out of work overnight. A year ago at this podium, I pledged the following: My jobs agenda will expand the ability of emerging entrepreneurs and businesses to get access to capital when they need it most. When Lt. Gov. Phil Scott and I traveled the state together, reaching out to the hundreds of small businesses shuttered by triple storms, our message to job creators was: We stand by you, we stand with you, and the state of Vermont will do its part in helping you get back on your feet. Partnering with the Vermont Economic Development Authority, we created an emergency low interest loan program that, with minimal bureaucracy and maximum effectiveness, got credit of up to $100,000 to crippled job creators within days. More than 340 businesses and farms were granted loans, totaling $15.3 million. With liquidity, Vermont ingenuity and hard work, miracle after miracle happened as business after business reopened. ·        Bartleby’s Bookstore in Wilmington: Open·        Leader Home Center in Brattleboro: Open·        Simon Pierce in Windsor: Open·        The Red Wagon Toy Company in Woodstock: Open·        Winhall Market in Bondville: Open·        Sunrise General Store in Bridgewater Corners: Open·        Wall-Goldfinger in Northfield: Open·        Nelson Hardware in Barre: Open·        The Rochester Café: Open·        American Flatbread in Waitsfield: Open·        Positive Pie in Montpelier: Open And the list goes on and on. The lesson for Vermont government in helping to grow jobs in Vermont is simple: Getting credit to entrepreneurs when they need it most grows prosperity and grows jobs. In fact, there is nothing standing in the way of Vermont’s job creators that cannot be made right by a partnership with state government that is built on a foundation of common sense, trust, and expedited risk credit for businesses when others won’t lend. Vermont’s response to Irene perfectly illustrates the strong state of our state. Perhaps the greatest lesson that we can take from the challenge of the previous four months is that despite Irene’s devastation, despite our heartbreak and pain, we are bound by common purpose. We are also bound by tragic loss. To the hundreds of Vermonters who lost so much ‘ lost their house, lost their belongings, lost the land that their homes rested on or the land they tilled, we stand with you in the long recovery that lies ahead, to help you close the gap between your hopes and dreams that were washed away and the paltry $30,200 maximum reimbursement afforded you by our federal government. While we know that we can never make you whole, our resolve as your neighbors and friends to continue to help you rebuild your lives remains as strong as ever. We are so grateful to everyone who has stepped up and contributed, from the students at Moretown Elementary School who passed a jar in class to the countless church groups, non-profits and private companies who have contributed millions of dollars. Vermont musicians like Phish and Grace Potter held concerts that raised well over $1 million, and Tony Pomerleau, who just recently pledged a very generous $1 million to the Vermont Disaster Relief Fund. At a youthful 93, Tony is here today. Tony, we thank you for your generosity.   Vermonters have been so generous, but we have many miles to travel before we rest and many dollars to raise before we sleep. In that spirit, we are pleased to introduce our new Vermont Strong license plates, which can be purchased at vtstrong.vermont.gov. If you purchase this plate for the front of your vehicle, the proceeds will go to the Vermont Disaster Relief Fund to help those who need us. *** I could devote this entire speech to our recovery, because I do believe that Tropical Storm Irene represents a defining moment in Vermont’s history. But now is our moment to apply that same courage, strength and ingenuity to our most pressing need: growing jobs and prosperity for all Vermonters. Having witnessed what Vermont can do together, I have never been more optimistic about our ability to keep getting tough things done to help us grow jobs in 2012. If we can rebuild destroyed roads and bridges in less than four months, we can meet my promise of connecting every corner of Vermont to high speed internet and vastly improved cell service by the end of 2013. In the past year, we have connected 7,500 locations, and installed 1,600 miles of fiber in our ongoing effort to connect Vermont.  We are going to keep our promise of closing Vermont’s connectivity gap and we are going to grow jobs as we connect. If we can rebuild our transportation infrastructure at 35 cents on the dollar, we can lead the nation in arresting the skyrocketing cost of health care that is hurting job growth and picking the pockets of our struggling middle class. Your Green Mountain Health Board is hard at work building that system now. If we can reopen hundreds of flooded businesses in 14 weeks, we can transform Vermont into the innovative education leader, where from early childhood to higher education to continuing education, we train employees for the prosperous jobs of our future. In my budget address next week, in addition to addressing the challenges and opportunities of replacing our state hospital and state office complex, I will propose significant state investments in higher education and dual enrollment, all aimed at making Vermont students even more competitive and creating opportunities for employers to recruit the employees they are now seeking. If we can turn the lights back on in just three days for over 70,000 utility customers, thanks to the heroic work of our utilities, we can create jobs by harnessing the sun, wind, water, forests and fields to produce community-generated renewable power. We have made progress this past year, but we need to keep building. This session, I will propose requiring an affordable and achievable Renewable Energy Portfolio standard that sets a goal to obtain 75 percent renewable electricity in 20 years. I will also recommend that Vermont build on our Standard Offer program so that we can build faster. If we can reconnect hundreds of miles of washed out dirt roads in just days so that milk trucks can get to our dairy farmers who had to dump milk during the storm, we can create jobs by fueling the renaissance in locally grown Vermont food. This year we will continue to focus on farm to plate, farm to fork, buy local, and farmer’s markets, while addressing the challenge of producing enough Vermont-grown milk to meet the needs of our value-added dairy companies. If we can build partnerships between state and municipal governments to keep our citizens safe and secure, we can work together to address two of the most serious problems we face: winning the war on recidivism, and stemming the epidemic abuse of prescription drugs, particularly opiates, that is driving crime and destroying the lives of too many of our neighbors.Next week, I will also propose changes to our Prescription Drug Monitoring System. Access to the system by law enforcement needs to recognize an individual’s right to privacy while giving law enforcement the tools they need to track down abusive access so we can fight our prescription drug epidemic. This growing problem is so frightening because while FDA-approved prescription opiates are easy to get, many are just as addicting and dangerous as street heroin and crack cocaine. *** Since taking office a year ago, I have visited countless businesses throughout the state, and met with small business owners, from Bo Muller-Moore who had a simple idea to put the phrase ‘Eat More Kale’ on t-shirts and now works 14 hour days to fill orders from across the country, to Briar and Adam Alpert of BioTek, a global leader in medical applications technology. I am so optimistic about our jobs future, and every day I see evidence of Vermont’s entrepreneurial success. But we have a lot more work to do. Too many Vermonters continue to struggle to make ends meet for themselves and their families. But to those who say that Vermont is a bad place to do business, that our bold policies for job growth aren’t getting results, that our optimism about Vermont’s jobs future is not matched by progress, I ask you to consider these facts: our unemployment rate at the peak of the recession was 7.3 percent; today it is among the lowest in America at 5.3 percent. Chittenden County now enjoys the fourth lowest unemployment rate in America. Over the past year, new jobs in Vermont grew by 62 percent over the prior year, more than any other state in the nation. Vermont ranked second in a recent study of how well states use tax breaks and economic development subsidies to actually create jobs. If you don’t believe the data, I invite you to join me on the road, reaching out to Vermont’s job creators. Here are a few that I have visited this year. In Newport, Bill Stenger is working on several projects in Orleans County in addition to building a world class four-season resort at Jay Peak that employs hundreds of Vermonters. Bill and his partners are bringing Anc/Bio and four other new projects that represent a $350 million investment and will produce 3,000 direct and indirect jobs in the heart of the Northeast Kingdom. In Rutland, GE continues to expand one of the largest GE manufacturing plants of jet engines in the nation for both commercial and military aircraft. In Castleton, Hubbardton Forge is on track to meet its goal of doubling its sales in five years. In Barre, SB Electronics is up and running, with capacity to produce parts for 100,000 plug-in hybrid vehicles within three years. In Essex, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters is building a new plant that will employ hundreds of additional Vermonters and help fuel the exceptional growth of one of America’s most successful companies. Next door in Essex Junction, IBM continues to innovate and create the jobs of the future. Vermont’s IBM plant is thriving and adding jobs, and is now one of the world’s largest producers of semiconductor technology, employing 6,000 people. In Arlington, Mack Molding continues to hire and expand. In Vergennes, Goodrich is hiring. In Essex Junction, Revision Eyewear is thriving and has developed a new combat helmet that, if adopted by the U.S. military, will allow them to vastly expand manufacturing in Vermont. In Newport, Louis Garneau will be building new facilities to expand manufacturing jobs. From the Massachusetts line to the Canadian border, companies that opened this year include Commonwealth Yogurt in Brattleboro, Farmstead Cheese in Woodstock, Swan Valley Cheese in Swanton, and many other small value-added agricultural businesses are growing their customer base, creating jobs, and adding vitality to a dairy industry that is poised for revitalization. My administration and I commit ourselves every day to attracting entrepreneurs and growing jobs, one job at a time, as we slowly but surely grow our way out of the most painful recession in our nation’s history. Let me say one more word about staying competitive and creating jobs. Our tax policy has a direct impact on our jobs future. You may have heard me say this before: Vermont’s problem is not that our taxes are not high enough; it is that our taxes are too high. I am a proud and strong supporter of Vermont’s progressive income tax structure ‘ the most progressive in the country, where unlike the federal government, we require our wealthiest citizens to pay their fair share of income tax. But, we cannot correct the tax failures of Washington from the State House in Montpelier, and we must be always mindful that every day, we compete with our neighboring states for jobs. Therefore, I remain determined not to increase broad-based taxes on Vermonters as we begin to see signs of modest economic growth. *** Looking back on the last year, we have so much to be thankful for, and so many opportunities ahead. As we enter this new year, partisanship continues to paralyze our democracy in Washington, DC. At a time when many of America’s cities and communities beyond Vermont’s borders often seem more divided than united, our little state has distinguished itself. Indeed, there is nothing wrong with America that could not be made right by the ingenuity and caring spirit of the people of the state of Vermont. By continuing to set aside what divides us and finding common ground to unite us, we will rebuild our state while making the bold decisions that will lead to continued job growth and a bright future for Vermont. Let’s get back to work. Thank you.last_img read more

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Olympics: Félix Sánchez is golden in 400-meter hurdles

first_img Brazil’s Arthur Nabarrete Zanetti: Zanetti, 22, became the first Brazilian gymnast to earn a gold medal when he claimed the top spot in the rings competition. He scored a 15.9 on his routine, just ahead of China’s Chen Yibing (15.8) and Italy’s Matteo Morandi (15.733). Yibing defeated Zanetti at last year’s world championships. “Now I’m No. 1, but I have him to thank for coming this far because it was by training to beat him that I managed to do it,” Zanetti told reporters. “I knew it was very difficult but not impossible and my concentration and all my long years of training paid off.” Men’s basketball: Brazil (4-1) faces Argentina (3-2) in the quarterfinals after rallying for an 88-82 win over Spain (3-2) en route to the Group B title. Argentina, which is coming off a 126-97 loss to the United States (5-0), finished third in Group A. The winner advances to the semifinals on Aug. 10. LONDON – Here’s what you might have missed in recent Olympic action: Dominican Republic’s Félix Sánchez: He claimed gold in the 400 meter hurdles in a blazing 47.63 seconds. Sánchez easily bested the United States’ Michael Tinsley (47.91) and Puerto Rico’s Javier Culson (48.10) to take his place on the top of the medal podium. After the race, Sanchez dedicated his performance to his late grandmother. “I’ve been really emotional all week, thinking about her,” Sánchez told reporters. “All of us do it — you think about winning, you train so hard. You get to this moment and everything has to go right for you to pull it off.” Cuba’s Mijaín López: The heavyweight retained his Olympic title when he claimed gold in the Greco-Roman 120-kilogram (264-pound) class with a victory over Estonia’s Heiki Nabi in the final. López, a four-time world champion who claimed gold four years ago in Beijing, celebrated with a victory lap around the arena with his country’s flag over his shoulders. López also carried Cuba’s flag at the opening ceremony. Here’s what you should keep an eye on Aug. 8: Women’s field hockey: Argentina (3-1-1), which finished atop Group B, is slated to face Great Britain (3-2) in the semifinals. The hosts finished second in Group A. The winner advances to the gold medal game on Aug. 10 against the winner of the Netherlands (5-0) and New Zealand (3-1-1). Men’s volleyball: Brazil (4-1) finished second in Group B and earned a quarterfinal berth against Argentina (3-2), which finished third in Group A. The winner advances to the semifinals on Aug. 10 and will face the winner of the United States (4-1) and Italy (3-2). By Dialogo August 07, 2012last_img read more

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House passes Phase 3 coronavirus relief

first_img continue reading » Following Senate passage earlier this week, the House today passed the Phase 3 coronavirus relief package – the CARES Act – which includes several provisions for which NAFCU had advocated. The president is expected to sign it.NAFCU aggressively lobbied Capitol Hill throughout negotiations on the bill to ensure credit unions have the relief they need to serve members and communities as the coronavirus introduces challenges.The final legislation includes several wins for credit unions, including:flexibility for the NCUA in dealing with troubled debt restructurings (TDRs);an adjustment to the definition of eligible institutions to ensure credit unions are eligible for new Small Business Administration (SBA) programs; ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Grocon takes out top award at UDIA for build-to-rent offering

first_img Seniors Living — Halcyon Lakeside, Halcyon Design Excellence — Avalon by Mosaic, Mosaic Property Group Premium Small Scale Development — The Lakes Residences, Northern Peninsula, Sunland Group Families opt for apartments, over house and land FULL WINNERS LIST Master Planned Development — Parklands, Project Grocon Consultants’ Excellence — Parklands, Cardno, Archipelago, Arkhefield, and ARM Community Engagement Excellence — Plan your Brisbane, Brisbane City Council Lakeside by Halcyon won the Seniors Living category at the UDIA awards. Inside the build-to-rent project on the Gold Coast.“Smith Collective will be home to a collective of like-minded, everyday people, from academics, students and healthcare workers engaged in the neighbouring tertiary and hospital precincts to young professionals, families and downsizing retirees searching for an active lifestyle.” Avalon by Mosaic Property Group won the Design Excellence category at the UDIA awards. President’s Award — Parklands Project, Grocon CEO’s Award — Walton Stores, Aspect Architects & Project Managers Urban Renewal — Lucent Gasworks, Cavcorp Residential Care — Dovetree, Wesley Mission Queensland Affordable Housing — The Kurrajong Townhouses, Churches of Christ in Queensland BEST OF THE BEST: Parklands Project by Grocon won the President’s Award at the UDIA awards.Build-to-rent communities are the way of the future, providing more people with close access to community amenity at an affordable price.An early example of one such community is the development that housed more than 6000 athletes and officials at this year’s Gold Coast Commonwealth Games. Inside the build-to-rent project on the Gold Coast.“It’s got a really good example of retail and community delivery, which is what our industry is essentially about.”Featuring 18 apartment towers, 82 two-storey townhouses and a 6280sq m retail hub, the Grocon and UBS Asset Management project is one of the city’s largest urban renewal projects and has already announced plans for new Woolworths and BWS stores.UBS Asset Management executive director Michael Woodrow said international trends showed people were increasingly willing to forgo home ownership in favour of the quality of lifestyle and location offered by precincts such as Smith Collective.“Our vision is to create a thriving community unlike anything the Gold Coast has seen,” Mr Woodrow said. Affordable Small Scale Development — Baringa Urban Village, Stockland Retail, Commercial, and Public Use — 900 Ann St, Consolidated Properties Group High Density Development — Oxley + Stirling Residences, Aria Property Group Marketing Excellence — Drift by Mosaic, Mosaic Property Group Environmental Excellence — Minnippi, Urbex Medium Density Development — Arc on Lima, Mosaic Property Group Working towards a better future in southeast Queensland “It will be new for renters in Queensland and Australia, that they have the certainty of tenure in this build-to-rent sector that allows them to feel like the rental property is theirs and not quite so transient as current rental properties.”He said the purpose for build-to-rent communities was to provide people with an opportunity to live close to where the work.“People are going to concentrate it around areas where the demand is unable when people don’t have access to properties when they’re close to the fantastic amenity without paying top range acquisition prices.”Mr Murray said the project stood out it several categories and was a good example of urban renewal, affordable housing and medium and high rise density development. Residential Subdivision — North Harbour, North East Business Park Minnipp by Urbex by Aria Property Group won the Environmental Excellence category at the UDIA awards. Parklands Project by Grocon won the President’s Award at the UDIA awards.Grocon’s Parklands Project, took out the top gong at the 2018 UDIA Qld Mitchell Brandtman Awards for Excellence on Friday, November 2.The development is earmarked to become one of Queensland’s first built-to-rent communities was not only crowned with the President’s Award, it also took home the Master Planned Development award.UDIA Queensland state president Ian Murray said the project, now named Smith Collective, was selected from the pool of category winners as it was the “best of the best” and was the largest built-to-rent community soon to be available in the state.“It’s a new emerging sector for the Australian development industry and this is one of the first earliest examples in Queensland,” Mr Murray said. MORE: “Research shows that while an increasing number of people want to live where they work, shop and play, they also yearn for the security of long-term leases and ability to add personal touches to their homes.“By maintaining ownership of Smith Collective’s residential offering, we are able to grant those wishes and help our residents and retailers build a sense of community often lost within large-scale urban developments. >>FOLLOW EMILY BLACK ON FACEBOOK<< Lucent Gasworks by Cavcorp won the Urban Renewal category at the UDIA awards.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus15 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market15 hours ago Oxley + Stirling Residences by Aria Property Group won the High Density Development category at the UDIA awards. Wildcard — Sustainability through Innovation and Scientific Solutions, Rock Trade Industrieslast_img read more

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AGS conducts ‘record-breaking’ seismic program off Norway

first_imgAxxis Geo Solutions (AGS), a Norwegian ocean bottom node seismic company, has achieved several seismic production records during an Utsira multi-client ocean-bottom node (OBN) seismic program.One of AGS’ vessels. Source: WikimediaAGS said on Thursday that this season’s Utsira multi-client ocean-bottom node (OBN) program, conducted in conjunction with TGS, began on Saturday, July 3.The crew achieved a company record regarding a one-day single marine source count which recorded more than 50,000 marine sources.The company added that this milestone was only one element of what was a record seven-day acquisition window in all areas on the Utsira OBN program in the North Sea.The crew has acquired over 300,000 marine sources in the trailing seven days, an average nearing 43,000 marine sources per day.The record source production was made possible by a record number of nodes being moved within the same period, enabled by the Constant Velocity handling system.AGS accurately positioned and moved over 14,000 ocean bottom nodes and deployed over 700 kilometers of receiver line during the same period.It is worth reminding that AGS signed a global master service agreement with an unnamed international oil company in mid-June covering marine services, OBN acquisition, and other methods.In connection with this agreement, AGS received its first call-off for provision of services in the North Sea, and it expects to execute the work program during 2019 or 2020 North Sea seasons. New contract awards from this customer will be under the agreement and will be given as call-offs.Spotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

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