Finsbury sees declining cake sales

first_imgFinsbury Foods has announced falling sales in its cake business has resulted in a 2% drop in revenue for the 17 weeks to the end of October.The firm, which manufactures cake, bread and morning goods, revealed that group revenue was 2% less than the comparable period last year, and 4% behind on a like-for-like basis, excluding the recently acquired Goswell business.Its bread and free-from businesses continued to achieve double digit growth, with its acquisition of Goswell contributing to an 11% growth in sales. Like-for-like sales increased 8%.Commenting on the performance of its cake business, the firm said it has increased promotional investment and exited “some low margin products” as it has integrated its cake business.“Consumer behaviour is still being affected by the recession and premium range sales have been impacted in the short term,” commented chief executive John Duffy. “The economic environment remains challenging and uncertainty around input price inflation remains high. We continue to focus on integrating our businesses to improve efficiency and operating margins whilst gaining an improved understanding of our consumers.”last_img read more

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Press release: Address serious governance failures, RSPCA leaders are warned

first_img Press office The Charity Commission has issued the RSPCA with an Official Warning, after finding that a group of trustees (“officers”) failed to ensure they were sufficiently informed before making a settlement offer to the charity’s former acting chief executive.The Commission also found those trustees failed to act with reasonable care and skill in negotiating with that former executive.In May, it was reported that the RSPCA’s former interim chief executive received a significant pay-out from the charity, prompting the Commission to examine the trustees’ decision making.The Commission’s warning is critical of the trustees for not ensuring that the decision was properly made, particularly given the large sum of money involved.The Warning concludes that these failings amount to mismanagement in the administration of the charity.The Commission says it is vital that the RSPCA, an institution performing important functions, can demonstrate the highest standards of governance. But the regulator has had significant engagement with the RSPCA in recent years regarding the charity’s governance.It says the level of its engagement has been concerning considering the charity’s size and importance. The RSPCA has seen unusually high turnover among its chief executives, and significant periods of time without a substantive chief executive in post.David Holdsworth, Registrar of Charities for England and Wales and Deputy Chief Executive of the Charity Commission, says: Speaking on the wider issue of governance in charities, David Holdsworth added: Good governance in charities is not an optional extra, or a bureaucratic detail. Good governance is what underpins the delivery of a charity’s purposes to the high standards expected by the public. Charities that operate with their purpose at the core of all they do, and underpin this with robust governance and the highest standards of conduct will serve their beneficiaries better. Conversely, where we find weak governance, we are more likely to find a charity that is failing to meet its charitable potential. So good governance should be a priority for all trustees, especially those involved in important national institutions. Press mobile – out of hours only 07785 748787 The power to issue charities with an Official Warning was granted by the Charities Act 2016. It is designed to ensure a charity or its trustees know that a breach, misconduct or mismanagement has taken place and that it needs to be rectified. An official warning is not a statutory direction. The Commission cannot use an official warning to direct trustees to take specific action. However, it must specify any action it considers the trustees or the charity should take to rectify the breach, misconduct or mismanagement. Furthermore, failure to remedy any breach specified in a warning can be used as evidence of misconduct or mismanagement including when considering whether to exercise other specified powers.center_img Email [email protected] The Official Warning sets out actions the Commission recommends the charity takes to address its concerns. Among the steps set out are that there should be formal training for RSPCA Council members to ensure they are fully aware of their responsibilities as charity trustees, and ensuring the RSPCA’s council adheres to the charity’s code of conduct.The Commission also says the trustees should implement the recommendation of an independent report, commissioned by the charity, into the processes followed in recruiting and appointing a new chief executive.The regulator’s published guidance on its power to issue an Official Warning notes that trustees’ failure to rectify breaches specified in a warning would be grounds for it to take more serious regulatory action, for example using its powers to suspend trustees or appoint an interim manager.The Commission notified the RSPCA of its intention to issue the warning in June, and before the charity’s new chief executive took up post on 1 August 2018. The Commission has welcomed the appointment of a permanent chief executive and urged the trustees to work with him to improve the charity’s governance and management.ENDSNotes to editors The RSPCA is a much-loved national institution performing a crucial role in animal protection, with its staff and volunteers undertaking vital work. The public, and the RSPCA’s many members and supporters, need it to succeed and to deliver important benefits for society. They rightly expect that it should be run by its trustees to the highest standards. Unfortunately, that has not been the case and the charity’s governance has fallen short which has led to people asking legitimate questions about the pay-out to the former executive. Issuing an Official Warning signals to the trustees that we expect them to resolve this important issue and take immediate steps to improve the charity’s governance. The recent election of a new Council, the introduction of a new code of conduct and the recruitment of a new chief executive, provide an opportunity for a fresh start for the charity. The trustees must now show leadership, and work with the new chief executive in driving forward the required improvements in governance. The use of our formal legal powers is a significant step, and not one we take lightly. I hope that the trustees use it as an opportunity to work constructively with the RSPCA’s new chief executive and to show to their members, supporters and the wider public that they are committed to good and effective governance. If the trustees are not able to satisfy us that they have responded meaningfully and promptly to our Official Warning, we will not hesitate to take further regulatory action.last_img read more

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Jenny Lewis Announces Album Listening Party/Variety Show To Benefit Los Angeles Women’s Center

first_imgJenny Lewis has a new album on the horizon with her recently-announced On The Line LP scheduled to arrive on March 22nd via Warner Bros. Records. Her fans around the country will now get the chance to listen to at least some of the album in full ahead of its public release next month, as Lewis has announced a listening party/variety show/fundraising event set to take place this coming Sunday, March 3rd.According to Lewis’ website, the three-hour, one-night event will be available for fans to watch online starting at 6 p.m. PT and continuing until 9 p.m. The event will feature music, magic, a call-in hotline with Jenny, and special guests whose names were not revealed with the announcement. Lewis will, however, be joined at the event by comedian and actor, Tim Heidecker. Proceeds raised from the streamed listening party event will go to benefit the Los Angeles Downtown Women’s Center, the only organization in the Los Angeles area which focuses exclusively on serving and empowering women experiencing homelessness and formerly homeless women.Lewis followed up her initial album announcement recently by sharing the second single set to appear on On The Line with “Heads Gonna Roll”, which arrived on Valentine’s Day. The pre-release single featured contributions from Ringo Starr and Don Was.Lewis will embark on her 2019 spring tour starting March 21st in Nashville, TN. Her 2019 concert schedule features a mix of headlining performances in addition to a run of dates supporting Death Cab For Cutie throughout the summer months. Fans can head to her website for more schedule and ticketing details.Fans can tune into the event when it’s broadcasted live on Jenny’s YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter pages. Fans can click here for more info on the streaming options for the upcoming weekend event. Fans can also click here to pre-order On The Line.last_img read more

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Catching flux

first_imgAustralian photographer Stephen Dupont has spent years documenting dissonance.Dupont began working in Papua New Guinea in 2004, spending time with the gangs of Port Moresby, the nation’s capital and one of the world’s most crime-ridden cities.More recently, in 2011, Dupont traveled around the country, documenting a culture in transition as a Robert Gardner Fellow in Photography from Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. The fellowship, which supports a documentary photographer in an in-depth endeavor examining “the human condition anywhere in the world,” was created by documentarian and author Gardner in 2007.Dupont’s project examines the impact of globalism and the creep of Western lifestyles into a nation where traditional ways have long held sway.Dupont has long been interested in the clash of cultures. Living in Australia, he was first drawn to Papua New Guinea after two friends, a filmmaker and a photojournalist, traveled there. During his fellowship year, he focused on three areas: Port Moresby, a melting pot of the nation’s many tribes, rife with modern urban problems including crime, slums, unemployment, and AIDS; the fishing communities along the Sepik River, the country’s longest; and the tribes of the remote highlands, whose rugged terrain and isolated valleys still provide some insulation from the outside world. He took thousands of images using five different photographic formats, including Polaroid film and large-format, 4-by-5 cameras.Dupont’s work is on display through September at the Peabody Museum. The exhibition features diaries and large images that take the viewer to a country in flux, and also chronicle daily life — mothers sitting with their children, people dashing for shelter from a sudden downpour, a rugby team praying together before a match.The images hold echoes of Australia’s influence on the lowlands and the highlands’ eroding traditions. Dupont, who will participate in an online “webinar” on his work on June 27, found fertile ground at Sing-Sings, cultural events created by colonial authorities as a way to get highland tribes to interact peacefully. The events, which Dupont described as “tribal Woodstocks,” draw thousands to observe and participate in tribal dance, singing, and other competitions.To document the Sing-Sings, Dupont set up a portable portrait booth, using black or white sheets as backgrounds to isolate the subjects. But instead of using physical supports to hold the backdrop, Dupont had bystanders hold up the sheet. He then pulled back the frame to include the helpers around the edges. Where a portrait against a neutral background might be taken anywhere in the world, this technique allowed him to incorporate the flavor of the setting within the images.The Sing-Sing pictures show the subtle — and sometimes not so subtle — intrusion of Western influence into what is intended to be a traditional tribal display: one woman wears a white brassiere with otherwise traditional garb, while a man wears a drum made from a large plastic container on a sling around his neck.Dupont said the Sing-Sings have visibly changed since his first visit to the country in 2004. In addition to the Western items working their way into people’s dress, advertising is everywhere, with Digicel, the country’s leading mobile phone carrier, surpassing even Coca-Cola.“I was there in 2004 and there was far less advertising there,” Dupont said. “How will this look in 10 years’ time?”To get a sense of how people dress while away from the competitions, Dupont visited a traditional tribal area in the southern highlands. But a nearby liquid propane plant had brought in roads and infrastructure and moved people off their land. While some older people maintained traditional dress, most of the younger people wore Western clothes, adorned with a lone piece of traditional jewelry.“It’s the death of their culture. How long will it be before it’s completely gone?” Dupont asked.He may be around to find out. Though he has already done a lot of work there, the intersection of globalization and traditional culture is a rich subject area, and the diversity in Papua New Guinea means there’s still plenty to do.“New Guinea has really gotten into my blood,” Dupont said. “I feel as if I’ve only scratched the surface.”last_img read more

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Tracking Fritz Lang

first_imgFor many, the name Fritz Lang is synonymous with the image of a futuristic female robot, the haunting poster child for his 1927 science fiction classic “Metropolis.” But the Austrian-born director was a master of many genres, as visitors to the Harvard Film Archive (HFA) will see for themselves in the coming months.Beginning Friday and running through Sept. 1, the HFA will present a complete retrospective of Lang’s silent and talking feature films. With almost 40 works in total, the series is a tribute to the director’s remarkable range. It includes science fiction, spy thrillers, crime dramas, Westerns, and fantasy.In “1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse” Peter van Eyck and Dawn Addams attempt to solve a series of mysterious crimes and avoid becoming victims themselves.An in-depth look at Lang, whose career spanned almost 50 years, has long been a goal at the HFA. Following the success of last summer’s Alfred Hitchcock retrospective, the time was right.“It’s hard to imagine Hitchcock without Lang,” said David Pendleton, the HFA’s programmer and a big Lang fan. Hitchcock carefully studied the director’s work, Pendleton said, in particular Lang’s exploration of “ethical and moral gray areas,” and his treatment of outlaw types.“So often the police are less sympathetic than the criminals,” said Pendleton, “even though the criminals are repulsive in Lang’s films.”Lang (1890-1976) studied art early in life and started drafting screenplays while recuperating from wounds he sustained during World War I. His wife, screenwriter Thea von Harbou, was a collaborator on some of best-known German Expressionist films of the 1920s and early 1930s. The two eventually divorced, and Lang left Germany for Paris in 1933. Not long after that he decamped for Hollywood.Peter Lorre’s chilling turn as a serial killer who hunts children in Lang’s 1931 film “M” brought the character actor international fame.Critics agree that Lang did more than inspire some of the most memorable psychological thrillers in film; many also consider him the grandfather of the big-budget megahit. Much of Lang’s silent work, said Pendleton, “pioneered a lot of the genres that Hollywood now relies on for their summer blockbusters.”“People don’t even realize how influential he is.”Pendleton singled out “Metropolis” as the blueprint for any number of dystopian science-fiction films that followed. It still resonates 85 years later. The early 20th-century classic and 2012’s “The Hunger Games,” he said, both “represent this future with this extreme class difference in a technocratic society.”The series kicks off with a restored version of “Metropolis” that includes its original orchestral score as well as several minutes of previously missing footage. The new material fleshes out various subplots, secondary narrative strands that were stripped away when the movie was shortened for foreign export. The longer cut makes for a richer work, said Pendleton, and “offers the audience a sense of the complexity that Lang was trying to achieve with the film.” (The remainder of Lang’s silent works in the series will feature piano accompaniment.)Paul Richter plays the visionary swordsman Siegfried who wants to marry Kriemhild, the princess of Burgundy (Margarete Schön), in the first part of “Die Nibelungen.”Many movie buffs think Steven Spielberg is indebted to Lang for the unforgettable character Indiana Jones from the “Raiders of the Lost Ark” films. Visitors can draw their own comparisons on Aug. 23 when Lang’s silent film “The Spiders” (1919) screens at the archive. The two-part picture (a four-part series was the original plan) portrays a millionaire adventurer named Kay Hoog who travels to exotic locales seeking hidden treasures.Alfonso Cuarón’s Oscar-winning “Gravity,” from last year, carries echoes of Lang’s “Woman in the Moon” (1929). Lang’s movie — a “highly scientific film about space travel,” Pendleton said — highlights the director’s fascination with technology. His serious approach to the subject even compelled Nazi scientists working on the V-2 rocket to study the film in some detail.In the wrong place at the wrong time, Ray Milland and Marjorie Reynolds are caught up in complicated rings of espionage, murder, and the supernatural in “Ministry of Fear.”“Fury” (1936), a dark drama with Spencer Tracy, was the first of Lang’s U.S. films. The noirish “The Woman in the Window” (1944) and the love triangle “Clash by Night” (1952) were among the more than 20 others.If it????s a Western you’re looking for, try “The Return of Frank James” (1940), which screens July 28. The film, Lang’s first in the genre and his first in color, stars Henry Fonda in the title role, bent on revenge for his brother’s death.Pendleton picked the “often overlooked” 1937 feature “You Only Live Once” as his favorite. Set to screen on Aug. 9, the picture is “one of these ‘great lovers on the run’ films,” Pendleton said, a dark story that swirls with themes of injustice and redemption. But it’s also “tender and emotional, which is not always a quality we associate with Lang. And so I think it shows another side.”In “The Return of Frank James,” Clem (Jackie Cooper) and Frank James (Henry Fonda) seek revenge for his infamous brother Jesse’s death.Films are screened at the Harvard Film Archive in the Carpenter Center, 24 Quincy St., Cambridge. For a complete schedule, visit its calendar.last_img read more

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B’way Grosses: Rotten! Gets a Boost as Christian Borle Bows Out

first_imgChristian Borle in ‘Something Rotten!'(Photo: Joan Marcus) View Comments It’s hard to be the Bard, but it’s even harder to say goodbye. Christian Borle took his final bow in Something Rotten! on July 16, concluding his Tony-winning stint as a leather-clad Shakespeare at the St. James Theatre. The musical comedy bid farewell to him with a box office boost reaching six figures; at $745,373, it reached its highest numbers since April. Additional shows to celebrate similar upticks included The Color Purple, On Your Feet! and Aladdin. Meanwhile, Cats crawled its way back to Broadway and took in $603,553 for its first four purrformances (sorry), and The Crucible ended its limited engagement with a spike up to $613,098 and the highest capacity since its official opening.Here’s a look at who was on top—and who was not—for the week ending July 17:FRONTRUNNERS (By Gross)1. The Lion King ($2,513,984)*2. Hamilton ($2,282,207)*3. Wicked ($1,780,497)4. Aladdin ($1,683,488)5. The Book of Mormon ($1,486,802)*UNDERDOGS (By Gross)5. Motown the Musical ($424,198)4. Fully Committed ($415,767)3. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time ($393,715)2. Fun Home ($366,852)1. An Act of God ($337,557)FRONTRUNNERS (By Capacity)1. The Book of Mormon (102.07%)*2. Hamilton (101.38%)*3. Waitress (100.00%)4. The Humans (99.39%)5. Shuffle Along (99.12%)UNDERDOGS (By Capacity)5. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (67.45%)4. Paramour (66.51%)3. Jersey Boys (65.68%)2. An American in Paris (65.06%)1. Kinky Boots (64.72%)* Number based on nine regular performancesSource: The Broadway Leaguelast_img read more

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Onion Bugs.

first_img J. Cannon, UGA CAES The damage they cause “Thrips aren’t going to wipe out the Georgia onion crop,” he said. “But they definitely can reduce yields.” UGA CAES Georgia onion growers don’t usually think of insects as a major problem. But thrips can take a bite out of the sweet onion crop, said a University of Georgia scientist. Even a few causeÿ some damage Later in the season, he said, a few thrips may not cause as much damage. “However, in Georgia, thrips populations are highest during March, April and May,” he said. “So control efforts should be aimed at thrips during the spring.” David Adams, a UGA Extension Service entomologist, said the thrips weaken the plants. “They use their rasping mouthparts to damage the plant cells and lap up the juices,” he said. When it hurts the farmer, it hurts the consumer, too, Riley said. “If the supply is lower,” he said, “consumers will have to pay more for these onions.” Riley said this year one-third of Georgia’s 17,000 acres of onions may need thrips treatments they’re not getting. “With effective control of the higher thrips numbers this year,” he said, “farmers could add about $4 million every year to the value of the crop.” In 1998, Riley’s research revealed that fields with effective thrips control produced more and larger Vidalia-type onions. For about $100 per acre in treatment cost, farmers can pocket another $900 in onion value from fields where thrips are at damaging levels. Without treatment, the farmers harvested fewer jumbo and large onion bulbs. JUST ONE THRIPS doesn’t look like much, and just one isn’t; a single insect isn’t much larger than the period at the end of this sentence. But thousands of thrips can invade an onion field and prevent the bulbs from reaching large or jumbo size. But with Riley’s research data, farmers can be sure their thrips control dollars will pay off in the long run. He’s working to learn what thrips species damage onions and when it’s most effective to apply insecticides. “Even a relatively small population can have a significant yield impact,” said UGA entomologist David Riley. “Thrips damage the leaves. Without healthy leaves, the bulbs can’t develop to their potential.” Riley said he’s seen thrips populations increase during the past three years of his research at the Tifton campus of the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Adams said that the insects cause varying levels of damage at different times in the season. “If a lot of thrips are in the field early in the season, they can damage young plants as the bulbs are forming,” he said. “Effective control is vital then.” Research efforts paying off Treatment needed and effective Spotting the problem IMMATURE ONIONS like these are most prone to thrips damage during March, April and May. The thrips damage the leaves, weakening the plant and preventing full bulb growth. The damage thrips cause is hard to see. The insects are no bigger than the period at the end of this sentence. It’s hard to spot them. Bo Herndon, an onion farmer in south central Georgia, said he has to look hard to see thrips in his fields. “I’ve really got to get down and look close,” he said. “And even then, you’ll probably see the damage first. They’re easier to see if there are a lot of them. And at that point, it’s time to treat — fast!”last_img read more

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Unemployment rate up, jobs down

first_imgUNEMPLOYMENT EDGES UP SLIGHTLY TO 4.8% IN JULY, VERMONT’S ANNUAL JOB SLIPS DOWN 0.1%.Montpelier (August 15, 2008)– The Vermont Department of Labor announced today that the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for July 2008 was 4.8 percent, up one-tenth of a point from the revised June rate of 4.7% and up one point from a year ago.”National economic conditions continue to make job growth a challenge in the short-term,” said Patricia Moulton Powden, Commissioner of the Vermont Department of Labor. “This is showing up in our own labor market as a slight increase in unemployment coupled with a small decline in job growth.”Vermont’s observed seasonally adjusted monthly changes in employment, unemployment and unemployment rate are not statistically different from June values. For comparison purposes, the US seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for July was 5.7 percent, up two-tenths of a point from June 2008. Unemployment rates for Vermont’s 17 labor market areas ranged from 2.9 percent in Hartford to 6.0 percent in Newport. Local labor market area unemployment rates are not seasonally adjusted. For comparison, the unadjusted unemployment rate for Vermont was 4.5 percent, down two-tenths of a point from June 2008 and up eight-tenths of a point from a year ago.Jobs Data (Vermont’s job count estimates are produced from a statewide survey of business establishments conducted under the Current Employment Survey (CES) – a cooperative effort with the US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.)Seasonally adjusted job levels fell by 1,200 or -0.4% over June, and by -700 or -0.2% over the year. Much of the decline came as a result of a larger than expected fall in Local Government jobs – mostly education, (-600 or -2.0% over the month) and Construction jobs, (-400 or -2.8% over the month). However, sixteen out of the twenty-three seasonally adjusted series we measure showed declines or no growth in jobs. An important exception was Private Educational Services which grew by 700 jobs or 5.5% over the month.Before seasonal adjustment, Total Non-Farm jobs fell seasonally by -8,650 jobs or -2.8% from June to July – again driven by Local Government Education which shed 9,600 jobs for the summer. More importantly, annual unadjusted job growth was down -300 jobs or -0.1%. Seasonal job gains were seen in Construction (+150 / 0.8%), but the segment remains in decline showing a 650 job annual loss or -3.5%. Similarly, Retail Trade jobs grew by 100 in July, but still fell short of last year by 250 jobs or -0.6%. Leisure and Hospitality sector grew by 1,400 jobs or 4.2% in July, leaving the sector unchanged over the year.-30-last_img read more

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Long Island Forecast to See First Snow Friday

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The first snow flakes of the season are forecast to start falling on Long Island early Friday morning, but little-to-no accumulation is expected since the white stuff will be mixed with rain.There is a 90-percent chance that precipitation after midnight will change to rain and wet snow from 1 a.m. to 4 a.m. Friday, with a chance that more snow flakes will fall between 4 a.m. and 9 a.m., according to the National Weather Service. Temperatures are forecast to hit a low of 36 degrees overnight. It may make for a messy Friday morning rush hour commute.“Snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible,” meteorologists from the agency’s Upton office predicted.The storm is riding up the East Coast while a massive arctic air mass from the north blasts most of the nation with temperatures about 10-degrees below normal for this time of year. The heaviest snowfall amounts are expected around the Great Lakes, in New England and Canada.The winter solstice may not be until next month, but it is not uncommon for the first snow to fall on LI in November. The first flakes fell on LI during a Halloween nor’easter three years ago.Forecasters have given a 33-percent chance of LI experiencing more snow and slightly above-average temps in the coming winter season. The Farmer’s Almanac also predicted above-average snowfall this winter. But, neither source predicted exactly how much more snowfall is expected.Once this storm passes, temps are forecast to reach a high of 46 Friday with a wind chill between 30 and 40. The skies will clear up come nightfall, leading into a sunny Saturday and cloudy Sunday with temps remaining in the low 40s.There’s currently a 50-percent chance that rain will start off the week Monday, when temps may dip down as low as the high 30s during the day.last_img read more

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South Sulawesi policeman probed for alleged sexual harassment against three female officers

first_img“At first, one female police officer mentioned the harassment to her fellow female officers. It turned out that she was not the only victim. Two other female officers were harassed in 2017 and 2020,” Ibrahim said.Read also: Mataram University lecturer suspended over report of alleged sexual harassmentThe three women then reported the case to their superior, who opened an investigation against AM. During a preliminary investigation in which the three women and six witnesses were questioned, Selayar Islands Police chief Sr. Comr. Temmangnganro Machmud decided to remove AM from his post.Ibrahim said Temmangnganro initially tried to mediate the case, but after the three victims insisted on taking the case to court, the South Sulawesi Police agreed to begin the legal process. The South Sulawesi Police’s criminal investigation unit handled the case while the internal affairs division handled the alleged ethical violations. The investigation was still ongoing, Ibrahim said.“The perpetrator claimed that he was only joking, but for the victims what he did was harassment,” he added.The three women have continued their duties at the Selayar Islands Police while getting assistance for trauma healing.Besides the sexual harassment case, the Selayar Police had also named AM a suspect in an illegal logging case. (aly) The South Sulawesi Police have carried out their legal proceedings against the head of the Selayar Islands Police’s criminal investigation unit for allegedly harassing three female police officers who are his subordinates.“The harassment was not physical but verbal through improper words. It offended the dignity and honor of the victims and, therefore, the perpetrator must undergo the legal and ethical process,” South Sulawesi Police spokesman Sr. Comr. Ibrahim Tompo told The Jakarta Post on Saturday.The case came to light after three female police officers reported the officer, identified only as First Insp. AM, 47, for sexual harassment in July.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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