Student body launches #HireMe Scheme

first_imgThe Alliance for Bakery Students & Trainees has launched a scheme to help bakery students and trainees find jobs.The UK and Ireland-wide scheme is called ‪#‎HireMe‬ and is open to students and trainees who have finished their qualification or are studying. ‬‬It aims to benefit both the students and also bakery employers who are struggling to find people with the qualifications required to work for them.Students who are looking for a job in the baking industry can simply add their details, such as name, email, area of the country they wish to work in and a short personal statement on http://www.abst.org.uk/hire-me.html.This information is then sent out to bakery employers in the UK and Ireland, who can review everyone that is looking for work in their area, and contact them directly to arrange to see a CV or for an interview.The service is free for members.last_img read more

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Post-traumatic stress

first_imgThe diagnosis and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder has come a long way since the 1970s, with research now showing it is both more common and more treatable than once thought.While early doubters dismissed the condition as a Western phenomenon that arose because researchers pathologized a nonmedical condition, subsequent research identified physiological changes to the brain because of extreme trauma and led to the development of a consistent ability to diagnose the condition, both in Western and other nations.In fact, while surveys show that 7.8 percent of Americans have experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the numbers are far higher in some other nations, particularly those that have experienced intense violence. In Algeria and Cambodia, for example, which suffered through long civil wars, 37 percent and 28 percent of their populations, respectively, have experienced PTSD, studies say.Terry Keane, a longtime PTSD researcher, Boston University psychiatry professor, and associate chief of staff for research and development at the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, described progress in recent decades in understanding PTSD during a talk at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) Tuesday (March 23). Keane delivered his remarks as part of the Barry R. Bloom Public Health Practice Leadership Speaker Series, sponsored by the HSPH Division of Public Health Practice.Though rates of PTSD are not as high in the United States as in some war-torn nations, Keane said surveys show that PTSD is nonetheless a significant problem. Further, he said, studies show that the numbers and the levels of disability of those suffering from PTSD are higher than those of conditions such as major depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder.In the United States, women tend to develop PTSD at higher rates than men, something Keane said is not fully understood but that may be related to the personal nature of violence against women. About 60.7 percent of men experience trauma severe enough to potentially trigger PTSD during their lifetimes, with 8.1 percent of them developing PTSD. For women, 51.2 percent experience trauma, with 20.4 percent developing PTSD.PTSD is caused by an extreme trauma, which Keane described as a “massively disturbing event” that sparks intense alarm, anger, or distress. The condition is marked by apprehension and avoidance behaviors.PTSD also imposes an economic burden on society, Keane said, with its sufferers missing 3.6 days a month from work, costing an estimated $3 billion in lost productivity annually.“Can you imagine trying to hold down a job when you miss one day a week?” Keane asked.The biggest cause of PTSD is the sudden and unexpected death of a loved one, Keane said. In that case, PTSD is different from the normal grieving that such a loss would cause and is triggered by particularly horrific or difficult conditions surrounding the death. Other major causes of the ailment are wartime combat, sexual violence, and community violence.Those suffering PTSD can feel its effects for decades, Keane said. Progress in treating the condition has resulted in several therapeutic approaches and medicines that can help. Keane said he is very hopeful about the prospects of identifying and treating patients. One of the biggest challenges, though, is education to raise awareness.“I am so hopeful,” Keane said. “[We can] turn around a devastating condition, a costly condition … if we can just get this [information] out.”last_img read more

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Making the most of meals

first_imgHarvard University recently launched an effort to address chronic hunger among its neighbors in Cambridge and Boston by partnering with the local nonprofit Food for Free to donate nearly 2,000 nutritious meals each week to families in need. The initiative builds on Harvard’s long commitment of community engagement, which includes extensive partnerships with local schools and creating and preserving affordable housing.To ensure that breakfast, lunch, and dinner are available for every undergraduate, Harvard University Dining Services regularly purchases more food than is actually consumed. In the past, excess fresh food has been composted. The new program ensures that untouched food is instead provided to those who need it.Graphic by Georgia Bellas/Harvard Staff“This is a new initiative ― a new type of idea,” said Sasha Purpura, executive director of Cambridge-based Food for Free. “The food from Harvard is very healthy, easy to reheat, and simple to serve. None of it has to be cooked from scratch, which is not only time-consuming, but oftentimes not possible as some of our recipients live in motels or on the street where cooking options don’t exist. This is a new way of doing food redistribution and it has really been making a difference in the battle on hunger.”According to surveys, one in nine residents of Eastern Massachusetts doesn’t know where the next meal will come from, with nearly half of the group made up of children and seniors. The Greater Boston Food Bank alone has seen a 21 percent increase in requests for food assistance since 2008. Meanwhile, roughly a third of the food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted, according to the United Nations Environmental Programme.“Every day, too many families and individuals are forced to make very difficult choices — choices between eating or paying rent or utility bills,” said Meredith Weenick, Harvard’s vice president for campus services, which oversees HUDS. “At the same time, Harvard is aggressively seeking to minimize consumption and waste while implementing sustainable programs that increase efficient use of all that we consume on campus. Our partnership with Food for Free assures that any food we offer our students beyond what is utilized also serves our neighbors, so this really is a win-win for everyone involved.”In Harvard’s 14 undergraduate dining halls, the challenge is to maintain a menu that matches the demand of students, nearly 98 percent of whom live on campus and participate in the meal plan. As such, every location has a modest amount of food beyond what is consumed ― including salads, soups, main dishes, and sides. On an average day, the dining halls feed breakfast, lunch, and dinner to more than 6,600 students. That comes to nearly 20,000 meals a day.While HUDS continually monitors consumption, it is impossible to predict precisely how many students will eat and how much they will eat at any given meal. Since 2005, a student peer-to-peer outreach program designed to reduce food waste has halved the amount food being discarded that could otherwise be donated. (Composting has been and will remain part of Harvard’s extensive waste-reduction efforts.)Harvard tested the program last summer using the excess from Annenberg dining hall. Based on its success, all 14 dining halls on campus were brought into the program. In a typical week during the academic year, Harvard may donate up to 2,500 pounds of quality food that was never served. Given that the average meal is 1.3 pounds, each week approximately 2,000 meals are donated to needy families. In the six months since the program began, Harvard has donated more than 40,000 pounds of food.“HUDS has long been committed to giving back to the local community through food donations and various philanthropic activities,” said Managing Director David Davidson. “But this new Harvard food program formalizes and greatly enhances this giving in a way that is more effective, more wide-reaching, and more in line with the University’s commitment to sustainability.”The Harvard Sustainability Plan, released in October 2014, set an on-campus per capita waste-reduction goal of 50 percent by 2020. The Harvard Food Better campaign is engaging the entire University community in a dialogue about the food system, including waste. The Deans’ Food System Challenge, hosted by the Harvard Innovation Lab, is bringing together teams to develop solutions that make the food system more healthy and sustainable.“This new program further demonstrates Harvard’s interest in partnering with providers in the community to create innovative efforts to support local families,” said Kevin Casey, associate vice president for public affairs and communications. “This is a wonderful example of what can happen when local organizations work together to help meet an important community need.”“This is a sustainable program that reflects Food for Free’s mission to address the needs of local families on a daily basis,” said Purpura. “It is a model that is replicable and we hope that our pilot program with Harvard will both feed families and raise awareness at other institutions of higher learning and organizations in Cambridge. We are incredibly excited about this partnership and are looking forward to doing much more in the coming months.”The Cambridge Community Center, which is adjacent to the Peabody Terrace complex, is one of the local organizations receiving donations. The center serves 40 families a week through its after-school program, and has also served the food during family night gatherings and other special events. Eventually the center will have the ability to send after-school students home with meals for their families. A contribution from Harvard helped the center purchase a commercial freezer for storing donations.“These meals can make a real difference for some of our most vulnerable families. We are proud to work with Harvard, Food for Free, and other local organizations in helping to feed our community healthy, wholesome, and delicious food,” said Darrin Korte, director of programs at the Cambridge Community Center.last_img read more

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Commencement ceremonies to begin earlier than previously scheduled

first_imgCommencement ceremonies for the Notre Dame class of 2019 took place in the Purcell Pavilion at the Joyce Center at 8 a.m. — two hours earlier than scheduled — due to a “high probability of heavy rain and lightning,” according to a Sunday morning email from vice president for Campus Safety and Operations Mike Seamon and University registrar Chuck Hurley. The gates to the venue opened at 7 a.m., and there was no procession by the graduates or the faculty.Due to limited seating, ceremony attendance was limited to guests with a “red severe weather ticket.” According to the email, other guests were able to view a “closed-circuit broadcast” of the ceremony at several locations around campus: the north dome of the Joyce Center, auditoriums in the DeBartolo Hall, Jordan Hall of Science and Compton Family Ice Arena. The ceremony was also streamed on commencement.nd.edu and WNIT2.Individual diploma ceremonies will take place Sunday at noon instead of the previously scheduled 2 p.m., according to the email.Editor’s Note: Story updated May 19 at 8:37 a.m.Tags: Commencement 2019, Inclement Weather, Joyce Center, Notre Dame Stadiumlast_img read more

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Global Programs 2015

first_imgBuilding the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ international reputation and a robust global community of support are the main goals of the college’s Office of Global Programs. With a full slate of research, academic and outreach activities and the introduction of a new strategic plan, 2015 has been a banner year for the office. More than 200 CAES faculty, staff, and students traveled abroad during 2015. Whether it was to attend or teach classes, work on an outreach project, complete an internship or perform field research, each trip helped to expand CAES’s international community, enhance its partnerships and extend its reach. CAES faculty and administrators traveled to Brazil, Ecuador, Indonesia, Italy, Mexico, Qatar, Senegal, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam to recruit graduate students and to develop outreach and exchange programs. To read more about one of these recruitment programs visit tinyurl.com/VietnamUGA. The office hosted international scholars through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) funded Borlaug Higher Education for Agricultural Research and Development (BHEARD) Program and supported the Feed the Future Peanut and Mycotoxin Innovation Lab (PMIL), a multipronged research program. To learn more about these programs visit tinyurl.com/BEHEARDUGA and pmil.caes.uga.edu. “Looking ahead (into 2016), we will continue enhancing our international footprint,” said Amrit Bart, director of the CAES Office of Global Programs. “We hope to provide more students with immersive intercultural experiences and intensify our efforts to promote research collaborations with international partners.”Guided by a new strategic plan that was finalized in early 2015, the office is working to support more international experiences for Georgia-based students and faculty and to recruit more international students and scholars to the college. This includes increasing financial support for student and faculty travelers and developing new partnerships in Asia and Africa, Bart said. For more details about the strategic plan visit global.uga.edu/news/2015/StrategicPlanComplete.html. “Too often strategic plans collect dust on a shelf. In the case of the Office of Global Programs, we’re referring to our plan on a daily basis as we decide how to assist CAES students and faculty to achieve their goals,” Bart said. “We are laying the groundwork for partnerships that will impact the University of Georgia from a student’s first day of class to a faculty member’s entire career.”Here are more highlights from the Office of Global Programs’ year: About 162 faculty and staff members from the college made 249 international trips, either as part of a research or outreach project or as part of a study abroad program.CAES welcomed 143 visiting scholars this year. Approximately 75 CAES students studied abroad this year, visiting a total of 26 countries. The top five most popular destinations were Costa Rica, Italy, Australia, France and New Zealand. The college organized and led four specific study abroad programs, including “Europe: The Grand Tour – Art and Gardens;” “Costa Rica: Coffee from Bean to Cup;” “Italy: Viticulture and Enology;” and “France: French Food Production, Culture and the Environment.”Dozens of international graduate and undergraduate students came to study at the college’s Griffin, Tifton or Athens, Georgia, campuses. To stay up to date on the CAES Office of Global Programs, visit global.uga.edu.last_img read more

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NextGen know-how: Take responsibility for your life

first_img 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr I recently had the opportunity to attend a week-long conference with Jack Canfield, co-author of the Chicken Soup for the Soul series and The Success Principles: How to Get From Where You Are to Where You Want to Be. The event was focused on helping people break through to higher levels of success.The first principle of success Jack introduced was “Take 100% Responsibility for Your Life.” Most of us have been conditioned to blame something or someone outside of ourselves for the parts of our life we don’t like. But the truth is, there is only one person who is responsible for the quality of life you live: you.When Jack first introduced this success principle, my immediate thought was that I didn’t have room for improvement. I take responsibility for my life. I don’t blame others for my outcomes. But as we got deeper into the topic, I realized there are places where excuses linger and I don’t take full responsibility. continue reading »last_img read more

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Cappelli: Destinations in Croatia can no longer be viewed as one place, tourism transcends administrative boundaries

first_imgThe three-day program of this event brings a handful of educational workshops and presentations, and in addition to the traditional meeting with representatives of the Croatian Government and the Croatian Tourist Forum, this year’s Days of Croatian Tourism will be crowned with awards and recognitions for the best actions of the Croatian Tourist Board and Croatian Chamber of Commerce.  RELATED NEWS: “From the very beginning of its mandate, the Government of the Republic of Croatia has been focused on encouraging the development of the Croatian continent, in which the tourism and hospitality sector plays a major role. That is why we decided to hold the Days of Croatian Tourism in Slavonia this year. In addition to this year’s Days of Croatian Tourism, numerous and diverse events are held in the host counties in order to present Slavonia in the way it deserves, and that is as a destination rich in content, beauty, culture and an indispensable part of Croatian tourist offer.. ” Minister of Tourism Gari Cappelli pointed out at the opening of the Croatian Tourism Day. At the end of the day in the evening in Vinkovci, the first part of the awards of the Croatian Tourist Board and the Croatian Chamber of Commerce in the categories for destinations of the year, attractions of the year, awards to the business sector (Tourist flower – quality for Croatia) and people in tourism. “This year’s Days of Croatian Tourism are special because they are not held in one place but in five counties of Slavonia, Baranja and Srijem. Destinations in Croatia can no longer be viewed as one place, tourism transcends administrative boundaries and that is why these Days of Croatian Tourism are special, because they represent what we build the future of tourism, and it is the joint presentation and development of destinations which, although special in their own way, one whole, a complete tourist story ” Cappelli concluded. Photo by Mint “In recent years, we have focused all our attention on our beautiful coast, while neglecting the continental part of the country. I am glad that this has been changing lately, so we are paying more and more attention to the interior of the country, which has a lot of tourist potential. We Slavonians know very well the potential of our homeland, but we must make sure that others find out about it. That is why it is important that we smartly build the brand of Slavonia and the interior of the country in general. In addition to gastronomy and local culture, we must offer guests other facilities. First of all, we need to specialize, focus on targeted niches, such as cycling or agritourism, which attract tourists throughout the year, not just a few months of the season” said the president of the Croatian Chamber of Commerce, Luka Burilović. Yesterday, a traditional meeting of tourist workers and all stakeholders in the tourist system of the Republic of Croatia was opened in Vukovar – Croatian Tourism Days (DHT) which are organized by the Ministry of Tourism, the Croatian National Tourist Board and the Croatian Chamber of Commerce since October 2 to 5, 2019 in Slavonia. center_img DAYS OF CROATIAN TOURISM BEGIN IN SLAVONIA. AND IT ALL STARTED WITH ONE CRAZY IDEA “I am extremely glad that the Days of Croatian Tourism are being held for the first time in history in the continental part of our country, in Slavonia, our still somewhat undiscovered tourist pearl. I am sure that this traditional tourist gathering, which gathers over 1000 participants, will be an additional wind in the back of the promotion and further positioning of Slavonia, both in the domestic market and in foreign markets that increasingly recognize this region as a desirable and indigenous tourist destination., he said HTZ Director Kristjan Stanicic, adding that he is sure that all Slavonians will prove to be excellent hosts.” Also, Cappelli pays special attention to the synergy and association of tourist boards, which is significant because the need for synergy and destination branding is increasingly emphasized in the everyday narrative, which we have been waiting for for years. After the island of Hvar, Slavonia should finally be presented and branded as one tourist brand, and not five as before. Cover photo: Eltz Castle, Vukovar City Museum The main part of the program begins today, October 03, when three presentations were organized for the participants, which include a visit to Slavonski Brod, Bukovlje, where the first boat farm is located – Eco-ethno Farm Savus, where a lecture will be held. The Farm to Table movement. Then, a visit to Požega and Kutjevo where workshops and tastings will be held Wine story – Graševina and a visit to the Papuk Nature Park and the Jankovac Forest Park, where a tour and lecture will be held Papuk, a mysterious jewel of Slavonia. The second part of the awards will be presented on Friday, October 04 in Osijek for the 10 best in tourism, in the following categories: Tourist destination of the year, Sustainable tourism award, Beach of the year, Tourist event of the year, DMK Travel agency of the year, Restaurant of the year, Marina of the Year, Camp of the Year, Hotel of the Year, Anton Štifanić Award in the category of company / institution / association and individual, Lifetime Achievement Award and Special Recognition for Outstanding Contribution to Tourism of the Republic of Croatia. last_img read more

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Legal case round up

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Long live King’s Cross

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UK lockdown drives fastest growth in grocery sales for over 25 years

first_imgOf Britain’s big four grocers, industry leader Tesco was the best performer with sales up 12.7 percent, closely followed by No. 2 player Sainsbury’s with a 12.5 percent increase. No. 4 Morrisons’ sales rose 9.8 percent, while Walmart owned Asda was the laggard with a 6.5 percent increase. The overall star performer was the Co-operative, the No. 6 player, with a sales increase of 30.8 percent. Kantar said that in the most recent four week period to May 17 grocery sales growth accelerated to 17.2 percent year-on-year as the government announced the first stage of easing lockdown restrictions. In the most recent four weeks, the trend towards fewer, larger shops evident in April continued. Kantar said shoppers visited a supermarket 3.5 times per week on average, meaning 100 million fewer trips overall than the same month last year, and increased their spend each trip to 27.41 pounds (US$33.7) – nearly 50 percent more than they did during pre-crisis times.Topics : United Kingdom grocery sales rose by 14.3 percent during the 12 weeks to May 17, the fastest rate since comparable records began in 1994, as Britons adapted to the national lockdown, data from market researcher Kantar showed on Wednesday. The period included both the pre-lockdown rush to the shops in March, and eight weeks of stay-at-home advice from the government. The UK has been in lockdown since March 23 though restrictions are being gradually eased. last_img read more

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