Video: “Who’s Out of Step?”

first_img Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. HerbeautyHe Swears He’s Ready For Another Relationship. Is He Really?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Is What Scientists Say Will Happen When You Eat AvocadosHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Lipsticks Are Designed To Make Your Teeth Appear Whiter!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyDo You Feel Like Hollywood Celebrities All Look A Bit Similar?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Are Indian Women’s Best Formulas For Eternal BeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy More Cool Stuff Make a comment This sermon was delivered by Rev. Ken McMillan, Interim Pastor, First United Methodist Church of Pasadena on Sunday, June 10, 2012. Rev. Ken McMillan is a native of Santa Barbara, a graduate of UCSB with a B.A. degree in music, and a graduate of Iliff School of Theology in Denver. He was ordained as a Deacon in 1960, and as an Elder in 1962. His last appointment of 17+ years at Los Altos UMC in Long Beach was preceded by pastorates in Corona del Mar, Sierra Madre, Fountain Valley, and Highland Park. Since retiring in 2002, he has served interim pastorates at Anaheim UMC and Belmont Heights UMC. He currently chairs the Annual Conference Board of Pensions. Ken has been married to Patty for 52 years, and they have two children and two grandchildren.First United Methodist Church, 500 East Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, (626) 796-0157 or visit www.fumcpasadena.org. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Business Newscenter_img Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Sermons and Lessons Video: “Who’s Out of Step?” Delivered by Rev. Ken McMillan, First United Methodist Church, Pasadena Published on Monday, June 18, 2012 | 4:03 pm Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena 14 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Subscribe Top of the News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  First Heatwave Expected Next Week last_img read more

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Home gardening blooms around the world during coronavirus lockdowns

first_imgJaime Calder all but gave up on gardening after moving from the fertile soils of Illinois to dusty Texas, but the coronavirus changed her mind.The magazine editor and her family of five planted collard greens, chard, onions, blackberries, watermelons and peppers this year, expanding their garden while buckling down at home during the pandemic.People around the world are turning to gardening as a soothing, family friendly hobby that also eases concerns over food security as lockdowns slow the harvesting and distribution of some crops. Fruit and vegetable seed sales are jumping worldwide. “It’s supplementary gardening,” said Calder. “There’s no way this would sustain a family of five. But we’re amping it up, so we can try and avoid the store a little more in the coming months.”Russians are isolating in out-of-town cottages with plots of land, a traditional source of vegetables during tough times since the Soviet era, and rooftop farms are planned in Singapore, which relies heavily on food imports.Furloughed workers and people working from home are also looking for activities to occupy their free time, after the cancellations of major sporting events and the closure of restaurants, bars and theaters. Parents too are turning to gardening as an outdoor activity to do with children stuck at home after schools shut.”Planting a few potatoes can be quite a revelation to a child,” said Guy Barter, chief horticulturist at Britain’s Royal Horticultural Society, which has seen a five-fold rise in queries for advice on its website during the lockdown. Gardeners without yards are even planting potatoes in trash bags, he said. Gardening could trim retail demand for produce but trips to the grocery store will still be necessary. Bert Hambleton, retail consultant for Hambleton Resources, said supermarkets will continue to see an overall increase in produce demand as would-be restaurant-goers eat at home instead of dining out.Seed boom US seed company W. Atlee Burpee & Co sold more seed than any time in its 144-year history in March as the contagious respiratory virus spread, Chairman George Ball said.When they cannot find seeds in stores, would-be gardeners in Britain are seeking advice on how to extract them from tomatoes and squash purchased in supermarkets, Barter said.In Russia, demand for seeds rose by 20%-30% year-on-year in March, according to online retailer Ozon.Seed demand typically goes up in tough economic times, said Tom Johns, owner of Territorial Seed Company in Cottage Grove, Oregon. The company temporarily stopped taking orders over the phone due to a surge in demand and reassigned some phone workers to physically fill online orders, he said.”It doesn’t take long for people to become very concerned about the food supply – either the cost of food or getting food,” Johns said.Johnny’s Selected Seeds in Fairfield, Maine, saw a 270% jump in orders the week of March 16, after US President Donald Trump declared a national emergency over the coronavirus.Canada-based Stokes Seeds, which ships to the United States and Canada, received 1,000 online orders during the weekend of March 21, four times more than normal, President Wayne Gayle said.”We didn’t have the staff even just to enter them into the system, let alone fulfill them,” he said.The company temporarily halted all online orders and is prioritizing orders from commercial vegetable growers “to ensure our food security this summer,” according to its website.’I grow tomatoes, you grow carrots’With so many digging into gardening for the first time, there has also been a push to pool resources and collective knowledge on home food production.Nathan Kleinman, co-director of Philadelphia-based Experimental Farm Network, said more than 2,000 people signed up and attended weekly calls to discuss gardening best practices as they begin putting seeds in the ground.”The reaction was overwhelming,” Kleinman said. “It struck a nerve with a lot of people.”Melanie Pittman, an teacher who lives on 5 acres near Crete, Illinois, said while everyone was stocking up on toilet paper, her partner ran over to the local home improvement store to stock up on seeds and gardening tools.Pittman is more than doubling her garden, planting corn, beans, tomatoes, potatoes, onions and growing mushrooms. She is also working with other growers in her community to expand her reliance on local food.“I try to reach out to other individuals who are growing food in the area, to avoid the overlap – ‘I grow tomatoes, you grow carrots,’” she said.Gardening may be a rare positive trend to emerge from the crippling pandemic, said Diane Blazek, executive director of the US industry group National Garden Bureau.”We’ll come out in the end and hopefully everyone will be eating better and gardening more and more self-reliant,” she said.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Gosden happy with Hobbs

first_imgAnte-post favourite Jack Hobbs pleased trainer John Gosden in his final piece of work on Wednesday morning ahead of the 150th Dubai Duty Free Irish Derby at the Curragh on Saturday. Gosden is seeking to win the Irish Classic for the first time with the colt that finished second behind stable companion Golden Horn in the Investec Derby at Epsom earlier this month. “He worked this morning with William Buick on him and we were happy with him and the horse seems in good order,” said the Newmarket handler. “We would appreciate a shower or two and something close to good ground but we are pleased with the horse and we’ll be heading over, all being well between now and the weekend. “He handled Epsom surprisingly well for a tall, rangy, horse and we hoped the Curragh would suit him better and it was the plan to always come here and we are holding with it.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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