Speaker Series Continues Sister Cities Mission During Pandemic

first_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News Dr. Donald GrantSister Cities relationships between two cities in different countries are typically fulfilled and consummated through travel, exchanges, and in-person events. With those tools sidelined by the COVID-19 pandemic, it is a challenge to reap the benefits of these noble public diplomacy efforts.In order to bridge that gap, the Senegal Subcommittee of the Pasadena Sister Cities Committee launches its virtual speakers series at 6:30 p.m. Thursday with a talk by Dr. Donald Grant, Jr. titled, “Sister Cities: Breaking Historical Cycles by Building Bridges.”“We, the Senegal Subcommittee, have concluded that our confinement could be a remarkable opportunity to educate ourselves in, among other things, affairs of the world, African affairs, and relations between Senegal and the United States,” said Boualem Bousseloub, chair of the subcommittee.Pasadena has six Sister Cities partnerships, with Ludwigshafen, Germany (1948); Mishima, Japan (1957); Järvenpää, Finland (1983); Vanadzor, Armenia (1991); the Xicheng District of Beijing, China (1999); and Dakar-Plateau, Senegal, which was approved by the Pasadena City Council in 2018 after many years of discussion, planning, and research. An exploratory delegation led by Councilmember John Kennedy and Bousseloub visited the West African city.Following approval by both cities, Dakar-Plateau Mayor Alioune Ndoye led a delegation to Pasadena in June 2019 and Pasadena Mayor Terry Tornek led a delegation to Dakar-Plateau in March to finalize the partnership.Grant will speak about “anti-Black racism and how a city like Pasadena can balance out some of what’s happening by taking advantage of this Sister Cities relationship, [because] we see consistent disparity in the city,” he said.Grant, who has a doctorate in clinical psychology, is executive director of Pacific Oaks College’s Center for Community and Social Impact (CCSI) in Pasadena. He is an international speaker, workshop facilitator, film and TV consultant, and published author. His latest book is Black Men, Intergenerational Colonialism, and Behavioral Health: A Noose Across Nations. He also serves as executive director of the boutique training and consulting firm Mindful Training Solutions.“My book is a study on Black men in the United States, the UK, Canada, and France, the similar outcomes that we experience and how history has led us to where we sit today as it relates to those concerns,” he added. “I’ll speak about that research to help us see how colonialism on the continent of Africa has led partly to many of the things we see today, and how this [Sister Cities] relationship has the capacity to remedy some of that.”Grant participated in early discussions with Kennedy, Bousseloub, and others about forming a Sister Cities relationship with a city on the continent of Africa, before Dakar-Plateau was eventually chosen.“Sister Cities relationships are so valuable, when you think about xenophobia and racism, particularly in our current climate,” Grant said. “They provide people with an opportunity to see through a new lens and think about things in a different way. Traveling just enriches your life so much, and a Sister Cities relationship has the capacity to do some of that without leaving your town. It provides a great opportunity for people to build relationships in ways they would not have before.”He added that the goal is to translate city relationships into individual relationships.“For Sister Cities, the goal should be to enhance the micro, enhance the relationships of individual people to curate change in a community,” he said.Grant said he hopes society sees lasting changes from the racial justice movement that has unfolded across the country this summer.“That’s another reason why I’m excited about this discussion, because shortly after Reconstruction in America, we saw this kind of renaissance where Black people were afforded some equity and there were Black politicians and wealthy Black towns that surfaced,” he said. “Shortly after that, Jim Crow was waiting right around the corner with segregation. My fear is that we will advance these global movements and pay attention to these concerns and then it won’t be sustainable because people will become complacent when they see some of the small gains. Keeping the history in front of us is critical.”Bousseloub said the Senegal Subcommittee is working on finalizing plans for additional virtual events, including exchanging ideas about curricula between teachers and correspondence between students from schools in both cities, and eventually a Pan-African market and festival.The subcommittee is currently planning a virtual event on Sept. 19 about Dakar-Plateau, the African Diaspora, and Senegalese history, culture, music, and education.Here are the Zoom login details for Grant’s Sept. 10 talk: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88488768580, meeting ID: 884 8876 8580. Or dial-in by phone: (669) 900-6833. STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Herbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCreative Ways To Burn Calories That Require Little EffortHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Is What Scientists Say Will Happen When You Eat AvocadosHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNutritional Strategies To Ease AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeauty People Speaker Series Continues Sister Cities Mission During Pandemic The Pasadena Sister Cities Committee begins a virtual series Thursday featuring Dr. Donald Grant of Pacific Oaks College By JUSTIN CHAPMAN Published on Thursday, September 10, 2020 | 11:42 am Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Subscribe Top of the News center_img 51 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it More Cool Stuff Make a comment Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Business News Community News CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Donegal IFA calls for Climate Change Bill to be scrapped

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Facebook Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margey Google+ Pinterest Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Donegal IFA calls for Climate Change Bill to be scrapped Newsx Adverts Previous articleIrish Government funding of A5 up for discussion at North/South meetingNext articleGovernment reaffirms commitment to fund Altnagelvin Cancer Centre News Highland Google+center_img Pinterest WhatsApp The IFA is calling for the proposed Climate Change Bill to be abandoned in light of the setting of a date for the general election.Earlier this week, the Oireachtas Agriculture Committee called for the bill to be put on hold, expressing concern about some of the restrictions it would impose.the IFA says the bill is ill-timed and badly-thought, with the association’s Donegal president saying the last thing farmers need is more restrictions. Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson By News Highland – January 21, 2011 Twitter Facebook LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton Twitterlast_img read more

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Karnataka HC Takes Suo Moto Case On Burning Down Of Shanties Of Migrant Workers In Bengaluru

first_imgNews UpdatesKarnataka HC Takes Suo Moto Case On Burning Down Of Shanties Of Migrant Workers In Bengaluru Mustafa Plumber2 Jun 2020 7:32 AMShare This – xThe Karnataka High Court on Tuesday directed the Registrar General to file a suo-moto public interest litigation on the basis of a letter written by Advocate Vaishali Hegde informing about an incident in which temporary shanties of migrant workers were burnt down near the Sunday Bazar area in Bengaluru East. A division bench of Chief Justice Abhay Oka and Justice S Vishwajith…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Karnataka High Court on Tuesday directed the Registrar General to file a suo-moto public interest litigation on the basis of a letter written by Advocate Vaishali Hegde informing about an incident in which temporary shanties of migrant workers were burnt down near the Sunday Bazar area in Bengaluru East. A division bench of Chief Justice Abhay Oka and Justice S Vishwajith Shetty directed the registrar to make the State government and Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike, as party respondents to the petition and posted the matter for further hearing on June 11.  A division bench of Chief Justice Abhay Oka and Justice S Vishwajith Shetty directed the registrar to make the State government and Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike, as party respondents to the petition and posted the matter for further hearing on June 11.The letter addressed to the Chief Justice Abhay Oka, on May 29, relies on reports published in the Times of India and other newspapers which reported about the incident. It says “The newspaper reports indicate the brazen action by unscrupulous and rowdy elements by taking law into their own hands and deliberately setting fire to the shanties/huts in the slum only with a view to ensure that voiceless and poor migrant labourers/workers are dispossessed from the land and rendered shelterless.” Further it reads that “The newspaper reports indicate that police have remained mute spectators and have not come to the aid of the migrant labourers by citing some proceedings pending before the office of the deputy commissioner.” Urging the court to send a strong signal to the rowdy elements that a society governed by Rule of law would not tolerate such brazen and illegal actions. The letter states “This court has been dealing with the suo-motu public interest litigation pertaining to the hardships and sufferings being faced by migrant labourers. This issue be treated as a suo-motu public interest litigation and monitor an appropriate investigation into the matter by ensuring the guilty are brought to book and not left to escape the clutches of law. It is also sought that directions be issued to the state and its authorities to provide requisite shetler, food and other facilities to the unfortunate poor migrant labourers. As per news reports, around 600 migrants from Kalaburagi have been living in Kacharakanahalli area (Sunday Bazaar area) for the past 20 years. It is said that before the lockdown, the residents had gone back to their villages. With the easing of the lockdown, when they returned, they found their places were gutted completely. Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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No Sussex regrets for O’Brien

first_imgAidan O’Brien has no regrets about sidestepping the Sussex Stakes at Glorious Goodwood with the brilliant Gleneagles. The dual 2000 Guineas hero and St James’s Palace Stakes winner looked set for a mouthwatering clash with top older miler Solow in the Group One contest, but was not declared, with connections citing the rain-softened ground as the reason. Conditions had dried up prior to racing on Wednesday, with the going officially described as good, but O’Brien insisted he was happy with the decision not run his star three-year-old. Asked if he had any regrets about not running, O’Brien told Channel 4 Racing: “No, absolutely not. I was delighted the minute I walked out on the track that he was at home. “The straight is on the slow side of good and Gleneagles is a fast ground horse. “There are absolutely no doubts. When we were listening to everybody before we came, we would be (having doubts), but the minute we put a foot on it we knew it was the right thing.” The Prix Jacques le Marois at Deauville and the Prix du Moulin at Longchamp are the next viable options over a mile for Gleneagles and O’Brien is not ruling out a step up to a mile and a quarter in either the Juddmonte International at York or Leopardstown’s Irish Champion Stakes. He said: “The lads will make the decision on where he goes. He could go to France for the mile race (Marois), he could go to Longchamp for the mile race (Moulin), he could go to neither. “He could go to York for the mile and a quarter, he could go to Leopardstown for the mile and a quarter. “Wherever he gets proper fast ground, he’ll go somewhere like that.” center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Hoornstra: A call for teams to act as civic institutions, not big businesses, for five months

first_imgIt might not be that simple.“Each collective bargaining agreement is its own animal. Parties deal with whatever baggage has carried over from the previous term,” said Eugene Freedman, a labor lawyer who has written about the ongoing labor negotiations in baseball. “There are a lot of issues from the players’ side as far as service time manipulation, the arbitration process, the free-agent process. Those are all things they’re already dealing with. I have no doubt those things will be key issues in the next negotiation.”Baseball’s current Collective Bargaining Agreement is set to expire after next season. If there is to be a 2020 season, players should set aside concerns about “baggage” from this negotiation and realize that any season, however short, is better than none at all. Teams, meanwhile, must place their “civic institution” function ahead of their “big business” model for the next five months.Here’s why: Anyone old enough to recall the cancellation of the 1994 World Series remembers how far afield a profit-seeking institution can stray from its sense of civic duty. Once that lesson sinks in with fans, it is difficult – if not impossible – to reverse.In 1998, researchers in Israel conducted an experiment. A group of 10 daycare centers was considering fining parents who were late to collect their children at the end of the day. Six of the 10 centers, chosen at random, posted a sign on their front-facing bulletin boards notifying parents that fines would be issued for tardiness. Twelve weeks later, the fines were rescinded. In the other four centers, no fine was implemented.Paradoxically, the centers that instituted a fine caused a significant increase in the number of late-arriving parents. And once the fine was rescinded, the rate of tardiness remained high. What happened?In his book The Moral Economy: Why Good Incentives Are No Substitute for Good Citizens, author Samuel Bowles argues that the parents’ thinking had shifted. Once the fines were implemented, picking up their children on time was no longer an moral concern (“I’m going to try to be on time because it’s the right thing to do”) but an economic one (“I’ll try to be on time, but I can afford to be late”). The thought process literally moved from one region of the brain to the other.Great. What does that have to do with baseball?Before free agency, before television changed a sport into a business in which players rightfully demanded a fair stake, players and owners often negotiated their financial concerns on their own, without representation from outside agents. In his monumental book “The Lords of the Realm,” author John Helyar describes a scene from the late 1940s, when Indians owner Bill Veeck left 25 blank contracts on his desk for players to assign themselves salaries for the season. One player reduced his annual salary by $5,000.“Decades later, that story is still told with horror at the players’ union,” Helyar wrote. “But it was  a stance that reflected the values of the time and relationships with management. Many players had warm relationships with their owners, who, in the words of one baseball man, ‘would do anything for them but pay well’.”Related Articles Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire The timing of this rhetoric amounts to salt in an open wound. This week, all 30 teams issued statements in support of communities of color in response to the death of George Floyd and the civil unrest that followed. The Cleveland Indians’ statement read, in part, “in our role as a civic institution, we strive to unite and inspire our city with the power of team.”The problem with that sentence is that professional sports teams act as both civic institutions and big corporations. Sometimes, the goals of the civic institution and the corporation run in conflict. Want to unite and inspire your city with the power of team? How about green-lighting a 117-game season tomorrow?Since most owners aren’t as outspoken as the most vocal players, it’s unfair to pick on the Indians. (The Indians are owned by Paul Dolan, who hasn’t outlined his preferred terms for a 2020 season.) Their statement was in the context of Black Lives Matter demonstrations, but it might well have applied to the Covid-19 crisis in America. We miss sports. We could use more unity and inspiration, even in times of relative peace.Profit is not the only concern of baseball players or owners right now. Athletes cannot practice social distancing on the field. They must fly across the country, entering and exiting airports, and sleeping in urban hotel rooms, during a global pandemic. According to multiple reports, however, negotiations over safety concerns have been mostly, quietly, agreed upon. One source close to the players’ union told me they will not accept a 50-game season through negotiation. However, he sees the possibility for compromise if owners can agree to stage “close to 90-100 games” excluding the playoffs.While teams have reportedly insisted they will lose money on every regular-season game played in an empty stadium, staging a longer regular season means more money for the players. That appears to be the tension preventing a 2020 season from beginning in labor peace. Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies center_img In 1994, fans who pined for the pre-free agency baseball of their youth were aghast to learn how big a business the game had become. They couldn’t, or wouldn’t, sympathize with a player or owner whose thinking focused on economic rather than moral concerns. Many fans were lost for life.Now, a new generation of fans is being forced to reckon with the same burden, a burden that feels weightless when we’re focused on the games on the field. The health-related concerns of an immunocompromised player are relatable; these tap into our moral centers of reasoning. But the monetary concerns of an owner or player are truly mind-wracking if you view baseball only as a civic institution. Yet monetary concerns are what is holding up a new season.The effect is a hopeless fan base held hostage. It’s time to play ball. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error If professional sports teams sell hope, baseball stands alone as the most hopeless sport in North America.Negotiations to begin a 2020 season are going sideways at best. The Major League Baseball Players’ Association formally proposed a 114-game regular season Sunday. MLB team owners want a shorter season, reportedly close to 50 games, before the playoffs begin. Wednesday, multiple outlets reported that owners are not interested in countering the 114-game proposal. Commissioner Rob Manfred can begin a season without the players’ consent; his authority to do so is what passes for hope in early June.Meanwhile, NASCAR is already running races. The National Hockey League is moving forward with its postseason, with only a few key details still to be set in stone. The National Basketball Association will reportedly invite 22 teams to Orlando to continue its regular season in July, under a plan that could be ratified Thursday.Baseball owners and players, meanwhile, have been arguing through the media about what is fair ground for negotiation. One star player is pitching for full public transparency of league revenues, not the defending World Series champions. Dodgers’ Will Smith: ‘I feel like it’s been five years’ since his 2019 debut last_img read more

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