Tuesday’s QPR quiz

first_imgTest your knowledge by seeing how many of these Rangers-related questions you can answer correctly.[wp-simple-survey-37]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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Stop the Presses! Human Evolution Falsified!

first_imgHuman bones found in Morocco undermine almost everything that has been taught about human evolution since Darwin. But is that news? Happens every year, doesn’t it?This news is so hot, we have to get the word out now and wait for a fuller analysis later. Evolutionary paleoanthropology is in big trouble, if a new find in Morocco is as important as the news outlets are making it out to be. Announced in Nature this week, the discoverers are dating bones from five individuals at over 300,000 Darwin Years old – over 100,000 years older than when they thought modern humans first began to emerge. And it was found in northern Africa – not at Olduvai Gorge or in some South African cave where most of the attention has been focused. Added to that, the discoverers found stone tools and chemical evidence of cooking, and are saying these people probably lived all over Africa at the same time!numerous features of the face, jaw and teeth were almost indistinguishable from those of modern-day humansA modern human skull this old mangles the evolutionary timetable about the emergence of Homo erectus, Homo naledi, Neanderthals and most of the other pop icons of human evolution, squeezing evolutionists like a vise into an untenable position. Overstated? Look at what reporters are saying:Our species may be 150,000 years older than we thought (New Scientist). Despite its early date, the skull shows a face “that the researchers say is virtually indistinguishable from H. sapiens.”Modern humans evolved 100,000 years earlier than we thought – and not just in east Africa (The Conversation). “Taken together, these methods indicate that Homo Sapiens – modern humans – lived in the far northwestern corner of the African continent much earlier than previously known,” says Matthew Skinner, part of the team publishing the find.Scientists now believe modern humans emerged at least 100,000 years earlier than previously thought (BBC News). The video clip also indicates that modern humans were living all over Africa at the time.Oldest Fossils of Our Species Push Back Origin of Modern Humans (Live Science). Charles Q. Choi reports, “In one study, computer models and hundreds of 3D X-ray measurements of the fossils suggested that numerous features of the face, jaw and teeth were almost indistinguishable from those of modern-day humans. Their faces were those ‘of people you could cross on the street today,’ Hublin told Live Science.”In Photos: Oldest Homo Sapiens Fossils Ever Found (Live Science). Jeanna Brynner displays 10 photos of the discovery site and the bones.300,000-year-old skulls that look shockingly like ours could rewrite the human origin story (Business Insider). “These dates were a big wow,” Hublin said on a recent call with reporters.Ancient Fossils from Morocco Mess Up Modern Human Origins (Scientific American). Kate Wong says, “In a way, far from tidily solving the puzzle of our origins, the Jebel Irhoud discoveries add to mounting evidence that the dawning of our kind was a very complicated affair.”The discovery and analysis was published in Nature in two papers:Jean-Jacques Hublin et al, “New fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco and the pan-African origin of Homo sapiens,” Nature 546, 289–292, (08 June 2017) doi:10.1038/nature22336.Richter et al, “The age of the hominin fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco, and the origins of the Middle Stone Age,” Nature 5 46, 293–296 (08 June 2017) doi:10.1038/nature22335.In the same issue, two commentaries discuss the implications:Ewen Callaway, “Oldest Homo sapiens fossil claim rewrites our species’ history,” Nature. “Remains from Morocco dated to 315,000 years ago push back our species’ origins by 100,000 years — and suggest we didn’t evolve only in East Africa.”Chris Stringer and Julia Galway-Witham, “Paleoanthropology: On the Origin of Our Species,” Nature. “The discovery in Morocco of the earliest known H. sapiens fossils might revise our ideas about human evolution in Africa.”The articles give clues as to how hardcore evolutionists will attempt to rescue Darwin from this discovery. They will attempt to find a mosaic of primitive and modern features in the skulls and bones. They will claim that only some modern human attributes evolved that far back; others had a ways to go (for instance, the face is modern, but they have an “elongated skull shape” as if that matters). And they will continue to assume that the brains of these people—not available for testing—were not fully modern yet.The web of belief about human evolution is too strong to break under any conceivable falsifying evidence. With Darwin Flubber in their explanatory toolkit, evolutionists have flexibility to stretch and shrink parts of the web of belief without giving it up. It’s happened before – many times. Almost every year, some new bone or skull has the press telling us, ‘everything you know is wrong’ about human evolution. Yet the story goes on.If these people (yes, let’s call them people) were really using tools and cooking food, they were not primitive. If these people had spread out all over Africa, they were not numbskulls. Consider the absurdity of thinking that people with those skills, and with anatomically modern skeletons, walking upright and probably communicating with language, just sat there slowly evolving but never launching civilization for another 290,000 years! It beggars credibility to imagine such a thing. That is 30 times all of modern history, in which Homo sapiens went from straw huts to the moon. In all that time, not a single one of them ever thought of building a house, planting a farm and riding a horse? Not a single bright young person invented the wheel? Look— they controlled fire, built tools, migrated long distances, and were probably better hunters than most of us. How can anyone fall for such a stupid story? The Genesis account makes a lot more sense: people acting like people always do, right from the beginning.We have to start emphasizing this point more, and pushing back on the Darwin Party propaganda machine that refuses to take falsification for an answer. They call themselves Brights and imagine themselves smarter (see ENST) than “religious people” (their dismissive label for all Darwin skeptics). Well, I’ve had it.  I am angry. I’ve been covering this charade for 16 years now. Year after year, these know-nothings tell us that everything they previously believed is wrong. But do they repent and apologize? No; they just replace the old myth with a new myth. All that Java Man stuff was wrong. All that Nebraska Man stuff was wrong. Piltdown Man was a pure hoax. All those National Geographic covers from the 1960s are forgotten news. All the Lucy stuff of the 1970s is old hat. Skull 1470, Nutcracker Man, Handy Man, nobody talks about them any more. The myths from the 80s, 90s, and early 2000 stories were all wrong: from Orrorin to Ida to Homo whatever. Now, this announcement takes the cake, sweeping away all the 2016 stories into the dustbin.If we don’t get together and call their bluff as the perennial confabulators they are, and put some shame into their faces, we have nobody to blame but ourselves for the continuance of the Darwin myth. Maybe my idea of calling these people ‘historical racists’ will help. They think they are intellectually superior to dead human beings who can’t defend themselves. But they turn around and believe that their rationality is the result of glorified monkey convictions! Such self-refuting nonsense should rule them unfit for rational discussion. The Darwin Party is guilty of fake science. Take the offense for once, and drum these know-nothings out of academia and the media.Update 6/09/17: Todd Wood on his blog downplays the importance of this fossil for creationism, saying that “they don’t really require any major shift in our understanding of the origin of humanity.” This is primarily because he considers all the Homo fossils as true humans, including Homo erectus and Neanderthals, which date back even further in the evolutionary timeline. In his post, though, he doesn’t address the absurdity of the evolutionist story that fully modern humans failed to civilize for a third of a million years. That’s what, in my opinion, needs outrage by all people with common sense, creationist or not.(Visited 2,386 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Too Soon to Quote the Buyer | Season 2 – Episode 15

first_imgRalph asks what to say when his dream client refuses to allow him to quote. Even if your business has a transactional component, you still benefit by being consultative.The Blog: https://thesalesblog.comThe Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever Need: http://amzn.to/2ejSajxThe Lost Art of Closing: http://amzn.to/2hXXgCxThe Lost Art Audible: http://adbl.co/2ABiSA8last_img

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Britain’s Andy Murray beats Swiss Roger Federer to win Olympic tennis gold

first_imgAndy Murray had Centre Court rocking on Sunday, winning gold for the home team and beating Roger Federer 6-2, 6-1, 6-4 in the tennis final at Wimbledon.The result was a royal rout. Murray swept nine consecutive games, breaking Federer’s serve four times in a row.The victory marked a breakthrough for the Scotsman, who has lost all four of his Grand Slam finals, three against Federer.For Federer, the drubbing marked another Olympic disappointment. Playing in the games for the fourth time, he sought a victory to complete a career Golden Slam but still earned his first singles medal.From the start, there was no doubting spectators’ loyalty. The retractable Centre Court roof opened shortly before the final, and Federer walked onto the sun-splashed grass to a standing ovation. Then Murray entered, and the roar tripled.At the far end of the All England Club, thousands of happy fans with grounds passes enjoyed a carnival atmosphere on the picnic hill known as Murray Mount while watching the match on a huge video screen.Federer wore red and Murray blue in the most colorful tournament ever held at Wimbledon. Their tactics were also in sharp contrast.Murray returned aggressively to repeatedly put on Federer on the defensive when serving. Federer tried to come forward more than in any match this summer, but Murray answered with a succession of crisp passing shots for winners.The fans loved it, waving Union Jacks of all sizes. “An-dy! An-dy” they chanted. They applauded when Federer won a point, but they roared when Murray won one.And the bounces seemed to go Murray’s way. One of his service breaks came when he hit winners that clipped the net cord on consecutive points. But then the net, after all, was British. Federer showed little frustration as the match slipped away. Instead, it was Murray tossing his racket in the second set when he made a rare error.Otherwise, the usually dour Scotsman had little to get upset about. When he netted an easy forehand on break point early in the match, he laughed at his mistake.Murray won with plenty of flair and a succession of spectacular shots. A lunging backhand pass in the corner had fans on their feet. And he erased a break point with an acrobatic leaping overhead, followed by an improbable reflex volley winner after Federer fired at him from point-blank range.Murray fell behind 15-40 serving in the opening game but rallied to hold, and from 2-all he took charge, winning every game until 5-0 in the second set.Federer struggled to hold but had his chances to break, including in the third game of the second set. He held six break points but Murray erased them all and won the game on the 20th point on an errant Federer backhand, one of many.advertisementlast_img read more

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Video: Iowa WR Tevaun Smith Breaks Odell Beckham’s World Record With 41 One-Handed Catches In A Minute

first_imgClose-up view of Iowa footballs.LINCOLN, NE – NOVEMBER 24: General view of footballs used by the Iowa Hawkeyes before the game against the Nebraska Cornhuskers at Memorial Stadium on November 24, 2017 in Lincoln, Nebraska. (Photo by Steven Branscombe/Getty Images)Your Guinness world record didn’t last very long, Odell Beckham. The New York Giants’ wide receiver set a world record on Thursday, catching 33 of New Orleans Saints’ quarterback Drew Brees’ passes in a minute with one hand on ESPN’s Super Bowl set in Scottsdale, Ariz. Iowa wide receiver Tevaun Smith one-upped the NFL star on Friday, snagging 41 passes using only one hand. [email protected] goes for @OBJ_3‘s one-handed catch world record and snags 41 in a minute! #GoHawks #Swarm2015 http://t.co/BnLBmRNutP— Hawkeye Football (@HawkeyeFootball) January 30, 2015Smith had two less catches in that one-minute video than he did during the entire 2014 season, during which he caught 43 passes for 596 yards and three touchdowns.last_img read more

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Louisville’s Facebook Account Screwed Up A Statistic, And Kentucky Fans Aren’t Letting It Slide

first_imgLouisville messes up stat in tweet.This past Sunday night, Louisville took down Northern Iowa to reach its fourth straight Sweet 16. Senior Wayne Blackshear also became the first Cardinals player in school history to play for four straight squads that reached the second weekend of the NCAA Tournament. Tuesday morning, the school attempted to celebrate the accomplishment by posting the statistic to its Facebook page. Unfortunately, they screwed up and named Blackshear as the only player in NCAA Division One history to accomplish the feat. That isn’t even close to true, as dozens of players in college basketball history to have reached the Sweet 16 four straight times.Kentucky fans, predictably, are having a field day, claiming that the school is perpetuating a “lie.”…. “And the lie detector test determined….THAT was a lie!” @KySportsRadio pic.twitter.com/D1uwIpmGoJ— Jeremy Kemble (@IAM4UKWILDCATS) March 24, 2015UL Athletics sends out a blatant lie today http://t.co/ZTni2u97L9— Matt Jones (@KySportsRadio) March 24, 2015University of Louisville claims Wayne Blackshear is the first to appear in four Sweet 16 games. Kentucky has had seven players do that.— UK Cat Facts (@UK_CatFacts) March 24, 2015Regardless, Blackshear’s feat is quite impressive. Can we get a Kentucky vs. Louisville national championship game please?last_img read more

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Jamaica Welcomes Inaugural Flight from Prague

first_imgThe Ministry of Tourism’s effort to secure airlift into the island from new and emerging markets is bearing fruit, with the arrival of an inaugural flight from the Czech Republic yesterday (Dec. 28). The 200-seat Boeing 800 aircraft from Prague, with 84 visitors on board, landed at the Sangster International Airport in Montego Bay, St. James. It was the first of 12 rotations that will be coming to Jamaica between December 2012 and April 2013, boosting arrivals for the winter tourist season. Passengers were met and welcomed by tourism sector officials, and were showered with gifts and souvenirs, while enjoying the melodic sounds of a local band. The first three passengers off the flight, as well as the Captain and Chief Flight Engineer, received special gift packages. Deputy Director of Tourism in charge of marketing, Sandra Scott, told JIS News that the inaugural flight from Prague represented the dawn of a new day for Jamaica’s tourism and the fruits of the hard work in the country’s efforts to find new and lucrative markets. “This inaugural flight from Prague is very important to our progress on new and emerging markets. This flight is shared with the Dominican Republic… and we welcome the passengers from this flight as it means a lot to our marketing efforts and our initiatives as we focus on new business. The passengers are really happy as most of them are coming to Jamaica for the first time,” she said. She informed that the passengers would be staying at hotels in resorts areas across the country as a way of “spreading” the business throughout the tourism landscape. Ms. Scott told JIS News that Jamaica will also welcome an inaugural flight from Moscow, Russia on January 1, with “more flights from other countries in Eastern (Europe) going forward.”last_img read more

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Irving Oil raises cautions about NB Liberals throne speech talk of carbon

first_imgFREDERICTON – Irving Oil says any New Brunswick carbon plan needs to allow the province’s businesses to remain competitive.Premier Brian Gallant’s government announced in Tuesday’s throne speech that his Liberal government would bring in carbon pricing that helps combat climate change.The premier says the pricing model will minimize the impact on consumers while calling on industry to reduce emissions or pay its fair share.In a statement sent to The Canadian Press, Irving Oil said 80 per cent of its production goes to the U.S., where its competitors face no carbon tax.Jeff Matthews, an executive from the firm, said in the release that the firm is “committed to working with all levels of government on a plan that protects the environment while also maintaining competitiveness for New Brunswick businesses.”He’s calling on the province to create a Made in New Brunswick carbon pricing model.last_img read more

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Phoenix legal defeat prompts FAA to address noise concerns

first_imgPHOENIX – Nearly 100 people strolled through the high school cafeteria throughout the evening, studying colored graphs of flight takeoffs and jotting down comments for officials.More than three years after they awoke to find window-rattling flights rerouted in an airborne highway above their homes, residents of Phoenix’s downtown historic districts said they finally felt the Federal Aviation Administration was listening.A court victory by Phoenix and neighbourhood groups over the FAA last year has prompted the agency to be more responsive to residents as it continues to beat back noise complaints around the United States over the air traffic modernization plan known as “NextGen.”While challenges by residents of Washington’s Georgetown neighbourhood and other jurisdictions are still being heard in court, people in other affected areas such as Santa Cruz, California, have not sued the agency because they believe their complaints are being considered. Phoenix residents said they appreciated the FAA’s current approach.“They are being transparent now,” Opal Wagner, a resident of the vintage Willo district and vice-president of the Phoenix Historic Neighbourhoods Coalition, said at the first of three FAA public workshops held last week. She and others expressed disappointment that a fourth one wasn’t scheduled downtown where most noise complaints originated.“I think that it’s good that they are now dialoguing with the public,” Wagner said. “Maybe if they had done this in the beginning, there wouldn’t have been a lawsuit.”The historic districts and the city sued the agency after the FAA changed Phoenix Sky Harbor’s flight routes in September 2014, bringing airplane noise to public parks and the quiet neighbourhoods of charming bungalows, ranch houses and Spanish revival homes, some dating to the 1920s and earlier. About 2,500 households were affected. The noise got so bad for some, they sold their homes and moved.The FAA started revising flight paths and procedures around the United States in 2014 under the NextGen plan, which uses more precise, satellite-based navigation to save time, increase how many planes airports can handle, and reduce fuel burn and emissions. Noise complaints poured in from Orange County, California, to Washington, D.C., as flights took off at lower altitudes, in narrower paths and on more frequent schedules.The rollout of the procedures in Phoenix initially represented NextGen’s “most problematic implementation,” said Chris Oswald, vice-president of safety and regulatory affairs with Airports Council International-North America, a trade association that represents commercial airports in the U.S. and Canada. He said he was cautiously optimistic about the FAA’s more open approach.In the Phoenix case, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit on Aug. 29 agreed with the city and historic districts that the FAA was “arbitrary and capricious” in its flight procedure revisions in that area. The court said by leaving people in the dark, the agency made it impossible for the public to express views on the project’s potential effects — something the FAA is especially required to do for historic places and parks.Phoenix residents said they received no forewarning about the flight changes after FAA officials determined they would have no adverse impact and claimed a “categorical exclusion.”Following the court ruling, Phoenix and the FAA on Nov. 30 announced a joint plan aimed at resolving the dispute. Under the plan filed with the appellate court, the FAA agreed to reach out to residents while temporarily resuming the previous departure routes starting April 1.In a second step, it will develop satellite-based procedures for the original routes, seeking community feedback throughout the process.“I think we will get a considerable amount of relief with the return of the flights to their previous paths,” said Brent Kleinman, president of the Encanto-Palmcroft Historic Preservation Association in central Phoenix.“But the majority of the work is going to be in the second part of the process,” he said, which will decide the final flight paths.During last week’s workshops, Phoenix residents received printed material and mingled with FAA environmental experts and the airspace designers who fashion flight paths.“This is a format that we’ve used at other workshops, and it works really well,” said Ian Gregor, public affairs manager for the FAA’s Pacific Division, who attended all three sessions. “The people who have actually designed these procedures are on hand to answer questions.”Phoenix isn’t the only place where people say the FAA didn’t explain new routes or give them an opportunity to comment.In the Washington metro area, Georgetown University and neighbourhood groups have said the agency left them out of the loop about changes at Ronald Reagan National Airport. In nearby Maryland, residents objected to aircraft noise from both Reagan National and Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.But in Santa Cruz County, residents who initially complained about noise from planes headed to San Francisco said the FAA has been responsive to their worries. A dozen residents chosen by members of Congress in the three affected districts met with FAA representatives weekly throughout much of 2016 to come up with less obtrusive flight approach procedures.A new approach to the airport that is at least as quiet as it was before NextGen should take effect in August, said Denise Stansfield, founder of the Save our Skies citizen group. Technical problems temporarily increased noise for some residents recently, but once that pathway is permanently adopted, “you’re going to see the biggest celebration ever,” Stansfield said.___Anita Snow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/asnowreportslast_img read more

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Keeping staffers motivated productive during the holidays

first_imgNEW YORK — The holiday season can be a motivation and productivity killer at some small businesses. Staffers may spend time chatting or shopping online, ask to leave early for children’s holiday events or just not be in the mood to work.The companies with the most holiday problems are likely to be ones where November and December aren’t a particularly busy period — they’re not retailers, restaurants, caterers and other companies where staffers understand when they’re hired that this is prime time and everyone has to be physically and mentally present. At any company, if employees are distracted, owners may find that being firm but flexible will help keep everyone focused.Human resources professionals say holiday issues, like any matters that involve employees, are easier to resolve when staffers know in advance what the expectations and limits are. So, owners who sense that their workers are likely to be sitting and talking about parties and gifts may want to remind everyone now that chatting needs to be kept to a minimum. And if the owner or managers are seeing people giving in too much to temptation, a friendly, “hey, we have work to do,” is in order.It’s probably going to be impossible to completely stop staffers from shopping online. The solution may be to remind staffers that they should wait until break or lunch times to do their ordering. And if the owner sees someone shopping at other times, don’t make a big scene, but remind the staffer of the rules.Staffers who want to leave early for children’s plays or concerts should be given the chance to do so, but they also need to give the boss advance notice that there’s an event coming up and they must be held responsible for getting their work done. It may require some flexibility from an owner — allowing staffers to work remotely, come in early or leave late on another day. If the staffer needs a co-worker to cover for them, it’s the employee’s responsibility to set that up.HR pros warn that there’s a caveat about letting staffers leave for family events but not allowing others without children to take time to go to an event they’re interested in. Some employees can feel discriminated against if they see others getting what they feel is special treatment, and that could mean legal repercussions down the road. It’s best not to judge what kind of event is OK — as long as staffers are getting their work done, they should have permission to take part in an extracurricular activity.Some companies that have flexibility at holiday time give staffers an afternoon of their choosing off. Employees will consider that time to be a real gift — and knowing they’ll have a little free time may help them stay focused the rest of the holiday season._____For more small business news, insights and inspiration, sign up for our free weekly newsletter here: http://discover.ap.org/ssb_____Follow Joyce Rosenberg at www.twitter.com/JoyceMRosenberg . Her work can be found here: https://apnews.com/search/joyce%20rosenbergJoyce M. Rosenberg, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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