Interviews With Bluegrass’ Baddest Players To Appear In New Book “If You Can’t Play, Get Off The Stage”

first_imgDiving into the rich, vibrant and controversial history of bluegrass music, If You Can’t Play, Get Off the Stage: Bluegrass in Western North Carolina and Beyond is the debut work from Garret K. Woodward, arts/entertainment editor for The Smoky Mountain News. The book features interviews, profiles, quotes and conversations with the biggest names in bluegrass, mountain and string music, including: Andy Hall (The Infamous Stringdusters), Balsam Range, Billy Strings, Bobby Osborne, Claire Lynch, Dave Johnston (Yonder Mountain String Band), David Grisman, David Holt, Del McCoury, Doyle Lawson, Eric Gibson, Frank Solivan, Graham Sharp (The Steep Canyon Rangers), Jeff Austin, Jesse McReynolds, John Cowan, Larry Sparks, Marty Stuart, Paul Hoffman (Greensky Bluegrass), Peter Rowan, Raymond Fairchild, Rhiannon Giddens, Rhonda Vincent, Ricky Skaggs, Ronnie Reno, Sam Bush, Tim O’Brien, and many more.Garret K. Woodward was born and raised in the tiny Canadian border town of Rouses Point, New York — on the shores of Lake Champlain and in the shadow of the Adirondack Mountains. He graduated from Quinnipiac University (Hamden, Connecticut) in 2007 with degrees in journalism and history. After stints in Lake Placid, New York, and County Kerry, Ireland, he landed his first reporting gig at the Teton Valley News in Driggs, Idaho. In 2008, the Idaho Press Club awarded him first place for “Best Light Feature” for his story “Chasing the American Dream of Breakfast.”From there, Woodward crisscrossed America for several years as a music journalist, covering backyard get-togethers and renowned festivals like Burning Man, Rothbury, Grand Targhee, Outside Lands and Wakarusa. Since 2012, he has been the arts/entertainment editor for The Smoky Mountain News, and was recently named the music editor for Smoky Mountain Living magazine, both based in Waynesville, North Carolina.In 2015, he won first place in the North Carolina Press Association awards for “Arts & Entertainment Reporting” for his cover story 
“Bless Your Heart — The State of Women in 
Bluegrass.” In 2016, Woodward was nominated for “Bluegrass Print/Media Person of the Year” by the International Bluegrass Music Association (IBMA). The NCPA also recognized him with another first place in 2016 for “Lighter Columns” for his weekly column in The Smoky Mountain News, “This must be the place.”To learn more about the book, or to purchase copies, click here or email him: [email protected]last_img read more

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USC continues push to become smoke-free

first_imgAs part of USC’s Healthy Trojans wellness initiative, the University Park Campus is beginning to make steps toward becoming smoke-free.The USC Academic Senate — composed of faculty members — began considering a smoke-free campus last December, when it started to conduct research on the feasibility and the possible benefits.Though this idea is only in its conceptual stages, members of the Academic Senate are pushing for a smoke-free campus to become a reality — as soon as within a few years.Chris Chomyn, a member of the senate and co-chair for the provost’s advisement on family rights, said he heard many arguments from USC community members in favor of going smoke-free.“One of the most compelling reasons that I heard was from Dr. Joseph Randolph,” Chomyn said. “He basically let us know that smoking causes tumors in nine different organs of humans. Additionally secondhand smoke causes cancer in people, and tobacco can be linked to more than 30 percent of all human cancers.”When research and statistics were presented to the Academic Senate in April, an initiative was almost unanimously passed to turn USC in the direction of a smoke-free campus. Since then, the USC Staff Assembly has also proposed and passed a similar initiative after talking with the Academic Senate.As the smoke-free initiative becomes more of a realistic possibility for USC, the Academic Senate has begun to think of the logistics involved in making USC smoke-free, said Patty Riley, co-chair of the faculty environmental committee of the Academic Senate.“It might follow the process that other organizations have used, which is a phased process where they first designate smoking areas for some amount of time,” Riley said. “Then, eventually the campus or the hospital or whatever sort of organization it is goes completely smoke-free.”Currently, there are a few designated smoking areas on campus, near the Ronald Tutor Campus Center and the Pertusati Bookstore.Though there is no campus ban on smoking, there are restrictions already in place, including a ban on smoking in or within 20 feet of university buildings.Administrators are not sure when the initiative will become a reality, said Peter Conti, head of the Academic Senate, but they do agree on one thing: USC’s transition to a smoke-free campus will attempt to be understanding of the students’ experience.“The most important thing here is that it’s not going to be a punitive process; it’s going to be an educational process,” Conti said. “I think we want to make it more of a joint effort between communities, saying, ‘We can do this as a community.’”Though the faculty and staff are in favor of the smoke-free initiative, it must next be approved by student groups in order to move forward.The Faculty Environmental Committee, along with the Advisory Committee on Work and Family Life, plan to speak to both the Undergraduate Student Government and the Graduate and Professional Student Senate this year to learn if students are in favor of the initiative.Alex Williams, a freshman majoring in theatre who does not smoke, said she is in favor of a smoke-free campus.“I just find it inconvenient to have to walk around and smell cigarette smoke everywhere outside because people don’t follow the rules necessarily of being far away from buildings or staying in the designated smoking areas,” Williams said. “I personally think [a smoke-free campus] is fine because my own personal view is that smoking kills and it is hazardous to people’s health, long-term and short-term.”Williams said student input should be a large part of the process, and suggested public forums or school-wide surveys to gauge student opinions.Other students said they felt differently.William Hellwarth, a freshman majoring in interactive entertainment who smokes, acknowledged that smoking is unhealthy, but said he believes it is a choice.“A lot of kids value very strongly their rights, including stuff like smoking on campus,” Hellwarth said. “They would feel trodden on, certainly.”Conti said although students do have the right to make their own decisions, others also have the right to be healthy.“People around you have a right to be healthy too. And we want to encourage people to choose that right as opposed to choosing the right to smoke,” he said.The university already has programs to help students stop smoking with the aid of counseling services, patches and even prescriptions. As the initiative progresses, the emphasis will be on helping students to make healthy decisions.“It’s important that the students get involved,” Conti said. “If the students want this to happen, it will happen.”last_img read more

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Stop the Presses! Human Evolution Falsified!

first_imgHuman bones found in Morocco undermine almost everything that has been taught about human evolution since Darwin. But is that news? Happens every year, doesn’t it?This news is so hot, we have to get the word out now and wait for a fuller analysis later. Evolutionary paleoanthropology is in big trouble, if a new find in Morocco is as important as the news outlets are making it out to be. Announced in Nature this week, the discoverers are dating bones from five individuals at over 300,000 Darwin Years old – over 100,000 years older than when they thought modern humans first began to emerge. And it was found in northern Africa – not at Olduvai Gorge or in some South African cave where most of the attention has been focused. Added to that, the discoverers found stone tools and chemical evidence of cooking, and are saying these people probably lived all over Africa at the same time!numerous features of the face, jaw and teeth were almost indistinguishable from those of modern-day humansA modern human skull this old mangles the evolutionary timetable about the emergence of Homo erectus, Homo naledi, Neanderthals and most of the other pop icons of human evolution, squeezing evolutionists like a vise into an untenable position. Overstated? Look at what reporters are saying:Our species may be 150,000 years older than we thought (New Scientist). Despite its early date, the skull shows a face “that the researchers say is virtually indistinguishable from H. sapiens.”Modern humans evolved 100,000 years earlier than we thought – and not just in east Africa (The Conversation). “Taken together, these methods indicate that Homo Sapiens – modern humans – lived in the far northwestern corner of the African continent much earlier than previously known,” says Matthew Skinner, part of the team publishing the find.Scientists now believe modern humans emerged at least 100,000 years earlier than previously thought (BBC News). The video clip also indicates that modern humans were living all over Africa at the time.Oldest Fossils of Our Species Push Back Origin of Modern Humans (Live Science). Charles Q. Choi reports, “In one study, computer models and hundreds of 3D X-ray measurements of the fossils suggested that numerous features of the face, jaw and teeth were almost indistinguishable from those of modern-day humans. Their faces were those ‘of people you could cross on the street today,’ Hublin told Live Science.”In Photos: Oldest Homo Sapiens Fossils Ever Found (Live Science). Jeanna Brynner displays 10 photos of the discovery site and the bones.300,000-year-old skulls that look shockingly like ours could rewrite the human origin story (Business Insider). “These dates were a big wow,” Hublin said on a recent call with reporters.Ancient Fossils from Morocco Mess Up Modern Human Origins (Scientific American). Kate Wong says, “In a way, far from tidily solving the puzzle of our origins, the Jebel Irhoud discoveries add to mounting evidence that the dawning of our kind was a very complicated affair.”The discovery and analysis was published in Nature in two papers:Jean-Jacques Hublin et al, “New fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco and the pan-African origin of Homo sapiens,” Nature 546, 289–292, (08 June 2017) doi:10.1038/nature22336.Richter et al, “The age of the hominin fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco, and the origins of the Middle Stone Age,” Nature 5 46, 293–296 (08 June 2017) doi:10.1038/nature22335.In the same issue, two commentaries discuss the implications:Ewen Callaway, “Oldest Homo sapiens fossil claim rewrites our species’ history,” Nature. “Remains from Morocco dated to 315,000 years ago push back our species’ origins by 100,000 years — and suggest we didn’t evolve only in East Africa.”Chris Stringer and Julia Galway-Witham, “Paleoanthropology: On the Origin of Our Species,” Nature. “The discovery in Morocco of the earliest known H. sapiens fossils might revise our ideas about human evolution in Africa.”The articles give clues as to how hardcore evolutionists will attempt to rescue Darwin from this discovery. They will attempt to find a mosaic of primitive and modern features in the skulls and bones. They will claim that only some modern human attributes evolved that far back; others had a ways to go (for instance, the face is modern, but they have an “elongated skull shape” as if that matters). And they will continue to assume that the brains of these people—not available for testing—were not fully modern yet.The web of belief about human evolution is too strong to break under any conceivable falsifying evidence. With Darwin Flubber in their explanatory toolkit, evolutionists have flexibility to stretch and shrink parts of the web of belief without giving it up. It’s happened before – many times. Almost every year, some new bone or skull has the press telling us, ‘everything you know is wrong’ about human evolution. Yet the story goes on.If these people (yes, let’s call them people) were really using tools and cooking food, they were not primitive. If these people had spread out all over Africa, they were not numbskulls. Consider the absurdity of thinking that people with those skills, and with anatomically modern skeletons, walking upright and probably communicating with language, just sat there slowly evolving but never launching civilization for another 290,000 years! It beggars credibility to imagine such a thing. That is 30 times all of modern history, in which Homo sapiens went from straw huts to the moon. In all that time, not a single one of them ever thought of building a house, planting a farm and riding a horse? Not a single bright young person invented the wheel? Look— they controlled fire, built tools, migrated long distances, and were probably better hunters than most of us. How can anyone fall for such a stupid story? The Genesis account makes a lot more sense: people acting like people always do, right from the beginning.We have to start emphasizing this point more, and pushing back on the Darwin Party propaganda machine that refuses to take falsification for an answer. They call themselves Brights and imagine themselves smarter (see ENST) than “religious people” (their dismissive label for all Darwin skeptics). Well, I’ve had it.  I am angry. I’ve been covering this charade for 16 years now. Year after year, these know-nothings tell us that everything they previously believed is wrong. But do they repent and apologize? No; they just replace the old myth with a new myth. All that Java Man stuff was wrong. All that Nebraska Man stuff was wrong. Piltdown Man was a pure hoax. All those National Geographic covers from the 1960s are forgotten news. All the Lucy stuff of the 1970s is old hat. Skull 1470, Nutcracker Man, Handy Man, nobody talks about them any more. The myths from the 80s, 90s, and early 2000 stories were all wrong: from Orrorin to Ida to Homo whatever. Now, this announcement takes the cake, sweeping away all the 2016 stories into the dustbin.If we don’t get together and call their bluff as the perennial confabulators they are, and put some shame into their faces, we have nobody to blame but ourselves for the continuance of the Darwin myth. Maybe my idea of calling these people ‘historical racists’ will help. They think they are intellectually superior to dead human beings who can’t defend themselves. But they turn around and believe that their rationality is the result of glorified monkey convictions! Such self-refuting nonsense should rule them unfit for rational discussion. The Darwin Party is guilty of fake science. Take the offense for once, and drum these know-nothings out of academia and the media.Update 6/09/17: Todd Wood on his blog downplays the importance of this fossil for creationism, saying that “they don’t really require any major shift in our understanding of the origin of humanity.” This is primarily because he considers all the Homo fossils as true humans, including Homo erectus and Neanderthals, which date back even further in the evolutionary timeline. In his post, though, he doesn’t address the absurdity of the evolutionist story that fully modern humans failed to civilize for a third of a million years. That’s what, in my opinion, needs outrage by all people with common sense, creationist or not.(Visited 2,386 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Was calf CPR a miracle or another day on the farm?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Was it an early Easter miracle or just another day on the farm? Michelle Ramseyer thinks it might have been a little bit of both.Michelle and her husband Jeff raise around 200 cattle in an organic rotational grazing system with neighboring grain farmer, Dean McIlvaine. The Ramseyers provide the livestock and the labor while enhancing the fertility and controlling weeds on McIvaine’s farm ground for their Lone Pine Pastures operation in Wayne County, Michelle said.Michelle and Jeff Ramseyer“He actually owns the properties we have cattle on. We have 110 head of cattle and close to 80 calves on the ground now. We are a grass-fed operation. We started back in 2014 when we got the cattle. Dean is an organic crop farmer and all of the cattle are raised on organic grass. We do not feed anything other than hay and grass. Dean needed more fertility because his crops weren’t growing well. Jeff went to him and said ‘Hey we can get you more fertility, why don’t we start a grass fed operation?’ That is what we did,” Michelle said. “Our first 40 heifers were delivered in December of 2014 and we calved in March-April of 2015 and have gone from there. We graze on his cropland and we have about 200 acres of permanent pastures we will start here in another couple of weeks. We market our beef to Heinen’s Grocery Store and we have freezer beef we sell in the community though Facebook. We also have organic raised pork in an open barn with outside access.”On Palm Sunday, Jeff and Michelle went out to the pastures to check for calves in the farm ATV.“I go out with him a couple times a week. I attend ATI as a Dairy Science major, so I’m busy with that and we have four kids,” Michelle said. “It was Sunday and he wanted me to go out with him. We had had four calves that were born and he wanted to figure out which momma belonged to which calf and look at some of the cows.”That is when something caught Michelle’s attention.“We rolled up on the Kubota to a cow and a calf that were laying in an old hay pile. I said to Jeff, ‘She is laying on that calf.’ And he says, ‘No, she’s not. She’s fine.’ The momma jumped up as we got a little closer the calf just laid there,” she said. “Jeff jumped off the Kubota realizing, ‘Well, Michelle’s right.’ He ran to the calf and he picked the calf up and it was still warm. He kind of blew on its face and tried to shake it and I just went into ‘mom mode’ I think. I ran off the Kubota over to them and started mouth-to-mouth on this calf. Jeff said the first time I blew in the calf’s mouth his eyes about popped out of his head. Two more times I blew into his mouth and he started breathing on his own. He was laid out flat. His tongue was out — his tongue was blue.”The timing was extremely fortunate.“I just knew that he needed to start breathing and if he was still warm, he was suffocating. His head was under the cow and the rest of the body was not under the cow, his head was. So I knew he was suffocating, that’s the only reason he was like that. I just thought we got to get air into his lungs, and how else do you get air into lungs? I’ve taken child CPR courses and adult CPR courses. So I just did that and I also pounded on the side of his chest where I knew his heart was a couple times just to stimulate him and it must have worked because he’s up and viable now,” Michelle said. “So we happened upon this calf at the right time, because in our situation, normally what happens is we lose very little calves. But in any farming situation, you lose a calf and have no idea why this calf died. Especially beef. With dairy you usually know, but with beef all of the sudden you’ll happen on a calf and won’t know why it’s dead. So we’re very lucky.”Since then, the calf seems to be doing remarkably well.“It took him probably about 10 minutes after we got him going and he was up and wobbly and walked about 300 yards with his mom and started nursing. So we were excited we actually saved him and Jeff checked him yesterday and this morning and says he’s still nursing and he still looks good, so we’re hoping that there wasn’t any other damage,” Michelle said. “We really watch the health of our animals. It’s very important to us. I am a big softie when it comes to our calves. Those are my babies and they’re like my kids. They might not let me pet them, but we really watch our animals for care.”And while calf CPR may be a bit out of the ordinary for the farm, doing whatever it takes to care for animals in the best possible way is standard procedure for the Ramseyers and for livestock farms in general.“Right after that calf being revived, we were driving around again and the calves do this all the time — they’re laid out flat, you roll up to them and you’re like, ‘What happened?’ And they’re just laying in the sun sunning themselves,” she said. “Our hearts go in our throat every time we see an animal that is not doing well, or we think is not doing well. That type of situation happens on the farm.”Whether large or small, extreme measures for animal care are a part of every successful livestock operation. Improper animal care is more than an emotional issue, it is simply bad business for the farm.“We do it everyday. There are times when I get frustrated because we have to go check cows. Sometimes, the cows come before our family. That’s just the way it happens. There are dairy farmers out there that miss Christmas mornings. We miss family get-togethers because we have a situation at the farm we have to take care of and that’s first. We miss ball games because we have to go put fence up or we have to get cows in or we have a cow having a calf that needs assistance, and guess what, sorry kids, we’ll get you to your game but we might miss it. That’s our way of life, that’s what we do,” Michelle said. “For those people that don’t have that experience and have questions, I know not only us, but several farms that say, ‘Come, I’ll show you. I’ll show you what I do. Come to our farm. You have a question, we’ll show you what we do.’ We don’t have time to take tours every day, but we want people to realize that we take care of our animals. No matter what, we take care of our animals. That’s first. And sometimes it’s before family because that’s what pays our bills. It’s well worth it. We love what we do or we wouldn’t be doing it.”The lifestyle on the farm requires hard work, steadfast dedication to the animals and their welfare and even, on occasion, some heroic CPR. But, miracle or not, it is just another day on the farm.last_img read more

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Meet The Internet Video Stars: Hak5 & TechnoBuffalo

first_img4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App veronica henry 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… There was a time when YouTube – and all of Internet video – was dominated by cat videos. dumb stunts and crotch kicks. And while we’ll never be free of such lowbrow gems, the genre has grown to accommodate decidely more sophisticated content – particularly in the technology arena.While websites have traditionally dominated this space, thanks to YouTube, Revision3 TV and their competitors, a new breed of video content producers are building careers. Though YouTube’s turbulent relationships with talent have been widely publicized, other video makers tell a different story – one that sees the online medium as a critical component to their professional visibility and ultimate success.For more insight, I sat down with a couple of top content creators: Jon Rettinger, known by his legion of followers as TechnoBuffalo, and Shannon Morse, Linux aficionado and co-host of Hak5.Where It All BeganBetween them, their fans number in the millions, but it took years of hard work to get there. Tech geekdom for Morse began at home. The theater and choir club enthusiast grew up watching her father build computers – and he helped her build her first machines. When she didn’t make it into the theater program at college, her love for all things entertainment never waned. On a whim, she traveled with friends to Toronto to watch a live performance of Pure Pwnage, and met the cast and crew. Several return trips later, she met the talented guys at Hak5 and had an epiphany. As Morse puts it, “Talking about tech tied together my entertainment and geeky technology sides.”Shannon MorseFor Rettinger, it was addressing a market niche that wasn’t there. “About 6 years ago, my computer broke and I thought about switching to a Mac. When I couldn’t find any videos on YouTube that talked about how to use a Mac, I figured it was a good excuse for me to document my own experience.” Those initial YouTube videos, produced while he held a full-time job running a marketing department, quickly attracted lots of viewers. He knew a business idea when he saw it.Soon, Rettinger joined the YouTube partner program, at a time when he had about 8,000 subscribers. Still in search of funding, he pitched the idea for TechnoBuffalo to a venture capital firm – and was promptly laughed out of the room. But one of the VCs took pity on him, pointing out that he was inexperienced and suggested he get an MBA. Rettinger signed up for school and during his first semester, he pitched his idea again to a private equity firm and landed the funding he needed to launch the TechnoBuffalo website.Jon RettingerGrowing An AudienceTechnoBuffalo launched in 2010 and focused on strategically incorporating social media as a business tool. Today, the website has seen seven consecutive months of traffic growth – with a combined 15 million page and video views in October. “By trade, I’m a marketing guy, so I was able to quantify social media effectiveness,” Rettinger says. He used social media to get people involved and invested in the content of the site. He gave previews, incorporated feedback and essentially crowd-sourced the launch.Morse grew her audience organically. “When I first started, I didn’t know a thing about growing an audience. I just decided to be myself and talk to people. Being friendly was actually a key component to my growth in Internet media.”Both talk about the importance of maintaining that connection to the audience. But they warn you need a thick skin to deal with some of the trolls.Revision3 TV Enters The PictureHak5 started in 2005, around the same time as Revision3. After three years of operating independently, Hak5 co-host Darren Kitchen ran into Revision3 co-founder Jay Adelson in a Tekzilla IRC chat room. As luck would have it, the pair were invited to a Diggnation taping in NYC.After just a few meetings with CEO Jim Louderback, they had a new distributor and network. Kitchen and Morse still produce the show themselves and it is the longest-running show on the Revision3 TV network.Rettinger’s initial discussion with the Revision3 didn’t end in an immediate deal, but when he ran into Louderback at CES in 2010, things resumed moving forward. “They gave me the freedom I wanted,” he recalls. “Which was a really big deal for me.”The benefits of working with Revision3: their network, industry connections and reputation for growing and nurturing talent. 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… Related Posts What’s On The Backend?In addition to writing and hosting, Morse runs the Hak5 webstore – so if you have any order problems, you know who to turn to.Throughout the day, she’s researching, plugging through emails and writing show notes. In the studio, the co-hosts do a quick rundown of the episode and set up the shot. Paul Tobias – cameraman and editor – handles the technical aspects, using Panasonic cameras and a slew of wireless microphones. Recording takes about an hour and then it’s off to prepare for the next episode while Tobias edits and sends the finals off to Revision3 for distribution.At TechnoBuffalo, the setup is simple. Ralph Liernas does all the filming. They shoot with a Canon 5D Mark II, use a Zoom H1 and Rode microphone for audio. Rettinger does all the video editing himself with Final Cut Pro. He’s got this down to a science: filming to editing to upload in just 1.5 to 2 hours.The Nitty Gritty – CompensationSo how much do these folks make? The compensation model is pretty much what you’d expect. With Revision3 as their exclusive advertising and distribution partner, the Hak5 team gets a cut of ad revenue. Additionally, their fans support the show through their purchases at the Hakshop, where the duo personally make and sell hacking gadgets.For TechnoBuffalo, there is also ad revenue both from the website and videos. So ad clicks, page views and cost-per-action (CPA) deals – where for example, they get a cut if viewers sign up for Netflix (or other partners) using a special code linked to the show. A salary from TechnoBuffalo, sponsored videos and featured content on the website round out the revenue stream.Is there still room to succeed in this crowded field? Rettinger and Morse say yes. While professionalism is important (minimizing the um’s and like’s), Morse says, “Don’t be afraid to make a fool of yourself in front of people. They’ll laugh with you and appreciate your work.”Rettinger, who is a bit miffed that he chose the twitter handle @jon4lakers, adds, “And please, please, pick a good name.” Tags:#Streaming video#YouTube last_img read more

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Total abdominal colectomy

first_imgDefinitionTotal abdominal colectomy is the removal of the large intestine from the lowest part of the small intestine (ileum) to the rectum. After it is removed, the end of the small intestine is sewn to the rectum.Alternative NamesIleorectal anastomosis; Subtotal colectomyDescriptionYou will receive general anesthesia right before your surgery. This will make you asleep and unable to feel pain.During the surgery:Your surgeon will make a surgical cut in your belly.The surgeon will remove your large intestine. Your rectum and anus will be left in place.Your surgeon will sew the end of your small intestine to your rectum.Why the Procedure Is PerformedThe procedure is done for people who have:Crohns disease that has not spread to the rectum or the anusMany colon cancer tumors, when the rectum is not affectedSevere constipation, called colonic inertiaRisksTotal abdominal colectomy is usually safe. Your risk depends on your general overall health. Ask your doctor about these possible complications:Risks for any surgery are:Blood clots in the legs that may travel to the lungsBreathing problemsInfection, including in the lungs, urinary tract, and bellyHeart attack or strokeRisks for this surgery are:Bleeding inside your bellyDamage to nearby organs in the bodyScar tissue may form in the belly and cause a blockage of the small intestineThe end of the small intestine that is sewn to the rectum may come open (anastomosis), which may be life threateningWound may break openWound infectionsBefore the ProcedureAlways tell your doctor or nurse what drugs you are taking, even drugs, supplements, or herbs you bought without a prescription.advertisementBefore you have surgery, talk with your doctor or nurse about the following things:Intimacy and sexualityPregnancySportsWorkDuring the 2 weeks before your surgery:Two weeks before surgery you may be asked to stop taking drugs that make it harder for your blood to clot. These include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), Naprosyn (Aleve, Naproxen), and others.Ask your doctor which drugs you should still take on the day of your surgery.If you smoke, try to stop. Ask your doctor for help.Always let your doctor know about any cold, flu, fever, herpes breakout, or other illnesses you may have before your surgery.Eat high fiber foods and drink 6 to 8 glasses of water every day.The day before your surgery:Eat a light breakfast and lunch.You may be asked to drink only clear liquids such as broth, clear juice, and water after noon.Do NOT drink anything after midnight, including water. Sometimes you will not be able to drink anything for up to 12 hours before surgery.Your doctor or nurse may ask you to use enemas or laxatives to clear out your intestines. They will give you instructions.On the day of your surgery:Take the drugs your doctor told you to take with a small sip of water.Your doctor or nurse will tell you when to arrive at the hospital.After the ProcedureYou will be in the hospital for 3 to 7 days. By the second day, you will probably be able to drink clear liquids. Your doctor or nurse will slowly add thicker fluids and then soft foods as your bowel begins to work again.Outlook (Prognosis)After this procedure, you can expect to have 4 to 6 bowel movements a day. You may need more surgery and an ileostomy if you have Crohns disease and it spreads to your rectum.Most people who have a total abdominal colectomy recover fully. They are able to do most of the activities they were doing before their surgery. This includes most sports, travel, gardening, hiking, and other outdoor activities, and most types of work.ReferencesCima RR, Pemberton JH. Ileostomy, colostomy, and pouches. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Sleisenger MH, eds. Sleisenger & Fordtrans Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2010:chap 113.Fry RD, Mahmoud NN, Maron DJ, Ross HM, Rombeau J. Colon and rectum. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 19th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2012:chap 52.Cunningham D, Atkin W, Lenz HJ, Lynch HT, Minsky B, Nordlinger B, et al. Colorectal Cancer. Lancet. 2010;375:1030-1047.Review Date:12/10/2012Reviewed By:Robert A. Cowles, MD, Associate Professor of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, David R. Eltz, and Stephanie Slon.last_img read more

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Kansas Coach David Beaty Speaks Glowingly of Oklahoma State

first_imgIf you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers! “Their running backs are good,” added Beaty. “They got a true freshman, (Justice) Hill, out of Tulsa. Really a quick dude, very much along the same mold that they have always had there at Oklahoma State. The kid runs really, really fast. They have several that they use.“(Rennie) Childs is another good one that ones the ball well. They do a good job of making you beat them. They’re not going to give you the football. They take care of the ball. He does he want put it in jeopardy and they’re big up front and they move your defensive line a little bit in the run game. They got a good squad on the offensive side of the ball.”Beaty is right about protecting the football.https://twitter.com/solidverbal/status/786646361580199936“Defensively, Glenn Spencer is one of the best guys I’ve ever had to coach against. They’re high in the Big 12 in just about every category. They are second in the conference, third down defense, which is something I always look at. So they do a good job on money downs. They’re first in the conference in fourth down defense. So they’re not easy to convert against …“I think they’re first in the conference in red zone as well. One guy that sticks out to me, No. 96, tackle, I believe his name is Vincent Taylor, he’s a good guy, a hard-charging ball flare. They had two really good ends last year and I didn’t know how you could replace those guys. But they have two really good defensive ends this year.“They have nice recruiting. They are solid in the kicking game as well. It’s a good Oklahoma State football team, not unlike the teams he fields every year. But we’re excited about the challenge that we got put in front of us this week.”Can we hire David Beaty as a PR rep after his days in Lawrence are over? David Beaty and his Kansas Jayhawks have a single win this college football season after beating lowly Rhode Island earlier this year. However, they haven’t been far enough from a few other Ws. Beaty talked earlier this week about the challenge of facing the Pokes.“We got a great team coming in here,” said Beaty at his weekly presser. “Coach (Mike) Gundy, as you know is one of the best in the Big 12, if not in the country, and this year is no different.“They got a really good football team again, led by Mason Rudolph, as good of a manager as I’ve seen so far. He manages the ball really well, takes care of the ball. You’re going to have to beat these guys. They’re not going to beat themselves.“We are going to have to work to create some turnovers, though … He’s taking care of the ball, really, really well which bodes well for them.”Beaty also talked up OSU’s All-American candidate at WR.“One of more dynamic players in the conference, James Washington, who is a really talented guy. You just flip on the Texas game alone he makes a couple of plays in that game that are just ridiculous. He should have been tackled two or three times in a couple of those plays and somehow he stays on his feet and goes the distance against some really good players.”last_img read more

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