September 14 set for Corrigan’s culinary creations

first_imgEmail Previous articleTV3’s Take Me Out looking for Limerick menNext articleTalented singers combine for Irish tour admin Linkedin Facebook WITH news coming in recent weeks that celebrated Irish chef, Richard Corrigan was to cook up a storm at Thomond Park, Food for thought can let readers know that the date for this culinary extravaganza has changed to Tuesday September 14. An original date scheduled for two days later had to be changed as Corrigan will start filming a new 50 part series for Channel 4 Television then.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up However, keen to come to Limerick and fulfil his dream to visit the popular rugby venue, Corrigan will entertain up to 400 guests on the night and offer an insight into his noted cooking style with a slant to healthy eating for both academy players and children alike. Patrons on the night will sample the Epicurean delights as well as many other treats in store.“I love the alchemy that surrounds Thomond Park, its honest and pure, just like my cooking, I’m really looking forward to a great night in Limerick. An evening of inspirational recipes, good food and wine, elegance style and fun, I mean come on, that’s what it should all be about,” the top chef explained.“Food matters, cooking for family and friends is as important to me as sending any morsel out to customers from my kitchen in Mayfair,” he continued.Rising young Munster rugby stars, Kieran Essex, Mike Sherry and Conor Murray, will line out beside Richard Corrigan to prepare some recipes that are in keeping with the nutritional advice they have learned as part of their academy training.Tickets for this unique event are on sale now and are available from Thomond Park Stadium on 061 421106 or [email protected] and for more information click on www.thomondpark.ie. Advertisementcenter_img NewsSeptember 14 set for Corrigan’s culinary creationsBy admin – August 31, 2010 762 WhatsApp Print Twitterlast_img read more

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Prince’s Backing Band The Revolution Will Reunite For The First Time In 30 Years

first_imgPrince spent a number of years backed by The Revolution, a five-piece ensemble consisting of Wendy Melvoin, Lisa Coleman, Bobby Z., Brown Mark, and Matt Fink. While the group hasn’t performed in a number of years, the members have all recently come together in mourning of their late leader.In a new video posted to Brown Mark’s Facebook account, the band has announced plans to reunite. “We have decided, after spending three or four days together now grieving over the loss of Prince, that we would like to come out and do some shows,” Melvoin says. “We want to let you know that we’ll be there soon.”Watch below:While there’s no word of an official tour, the band does say “See you soon.” We’ll be sure to update when more information becomes available.last_img read more

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2 of 3 officers at Blake shooting in Wisconsin back on duty

first_imgKENOSHA, Wis. (AP) — Authorities say two police officers who were on the scene when a white officer shot and partially paralyzed a Black man in Wisconsin have returned to duty. The update announced Wednesday comes as Officer Rusten Sheskey, who shot Jacob Blake seven times on Aug. 23 in Kenosha, remains on administrative leave while a police review board examines the case. Sheskey was placed on administrative leave following Blake’s shooting along with Officers Vincent Arenas and Brittany Meronek. Police said in a statement Wednesday that Arenas and Meronek returned to duty Jan. 20. Hundreds of people were arrested and multiple businesses were destroyed during protests following Blake’s shooting. Kenosha County District Attorney Michael Graveley this month declined to file charges against Sheskey.last_img read more

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Local Roads Benefit From INDOT Funding

first_imgINDOT is awarding $86 million in federal transportation funds to rural cities, towns and counties. The announcement includes $47 million for road construction, $22 million for bridges and $14 million for bicycle and pedestrian projects. Over $10 million goes to recipients in southeastern Indiana.INDOT has awarded local federal transportation funding to:Dearborn County, $960,000 for replacing Bridge #24 on Cold Springs RoadDecatur County, $774,560 for rehabilitation of C.R. 1100S bridge over Sand CreekFranklin County, $796,800 for rehabilitation of St. Mary’s Road bridge over Whitewater RiverFranklin County, $65,280 for replacement of signage on county roadsCity of Greensburg, $269,730 for replacement of street signsCity of Seymour, $648,000 for West 2nd Street construction from Springhill RD to Vehslage RDAwarded rural projects would be designed, developed and have purchased land according to federal standards prior to bid during the state fiscal year beginning July 2016. Applications for those awards were due Friday, Dec. 13. In the near future, INDOT plans to issue a call for applications for rural local projects that would be bid during the state fiscal year beginning July 2017.The state programs 25 percent of its federal highway appropriation each year to fund larger local transportation projects. Metropolitan Planning Organizations distribute federal highway funds to local communities within the state’s larger urbanized areas while INDOT distributes such funds outside MPO areas. To receive federal monies, communities typically pay 20 percent in local matching funds.last_img read more

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Brewers waltz past Dam Inn Mates

first_imgBy Bruce Fuhr,The Nelson Daily Sports EditorThe West Kootenay Men’s Flag Football League got off to a slow start Sunday at the Mount Sentinel field in South Slocan.Game one of the two-game set was cancelled as defending champion Castlegar Vikings failed to field a team.In the second game of the day, Hume Brewers appeared to be in mid-season form, pounding Dam Inn Mates 21-1.Hume pivot Steven Doyle picked apart for three touchdowns en route to the lopsided victory. The victory avenged a loss by the Brewers to Dam Inn in the 2009 playoffs.The Mates, last year’s finalists against the Vikings, used a couple of different quarterbacks in an attempt to ignite the offence. However, the Mates could not penetrate the Hume defence.The WKMFFL is a five-team league — Castlegar Vikings, Hume Brewers, Dam Inn Mates, Nelson Impact and Our Glass — playing Sunday’s the Mount Sentinel field.Games time are 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.Each team plays six games with the league ending in October.The playoffs follow with the top place team facing the fourth best in one semi final and the second and third-place teams meeting in the other contest.All games are played at Mount Sentinel [email protected]last_img read more

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SANTA ANITA TO OFFER FREE SHUTTLE SERVICE TO AND FROM ARCADIA’S NEW METRO GOLD LINE STATION

first_imgSERVICE AVAILABLE EACH RACING DAY BEGINNING SATURDAY, MARCH 5 ARCADIA, Calif. (March 2, 2016)–Santa Anita Park has announced it will offer fans free shuttle service to and from the new Metro Gold Line Arcadia Station, beginning with the Gold Line’s Arcadia launch this Saturday, March 5.Beginning Saturday, the Metro Gold Line will, for the first time, provide service to Arcadia, Monrovia, Duarte, Irwindale and as far east as the Azusa/Glendora border near Citrus Community College.The Santa Anita Shuttle will run on all race days and will operate in addition to Arcadia’s Transit Shuttle Service, providing fans with a non-stop trip to and from The Great Race Place, which is located a mile from the Arcadia Station. The Santa Anita Shuttle will be offered through closing day of the track’s Spring Meet on July 10.“Along with many thousands of others, we are very excited about the Metro Gold Line launch on Saturday and we believe our free shuttle is going to be a great way for fans throughout metro L.A. to connect with us,” said Nate Newby, Santa Anita’s Vice President, Marketing. “This is a welcome development and a great alternative for many of our fans and employees who regularly commute on the crowded 210 Freeway.”Beginning Saturday, the Santa Anita Shuttle will operate on a 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. basis with pickup and drop off service available every 20 minutes. Santa Anita Ambassadors will staff each shuttle and be available to assist fans who may have questions regarding racetrack seating, dining, etc.The Arcadia Transit Shuttle, which features stops at Santa Anita, Methodist Hospital, the Westfield Santa Anita Mall and the L.A. County Arboretum, will operate seven days a week from 7:10 a.m. to 6:36 p.m. and be offered free of charge through June 15.last_img read more

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SETI Outreach Director: “Teach Evolution”

first_imgEvolution is the foundation of biology, geology, and astronomy, claims Edna Devore, Director of Education and Public Education for the SETI Institute.  Writing in Space.Com, she finds it hard to believe evolution is controversial (see 12/14/2004 and 11/30/2004 entries).  Why, just look out the airplane window; it’s obvious.  “Evolution is fundamental to modern biology, geology and astronomy.  Ignoring or discarding fundamental scientific understandings of the natural world does not prepare our children well for the future,” she concludes.  “As America strives to ‘leave no child behind,’ it’s time that evolution is not left behind in our science classrooms.”She’s barking up the wrong tree.  No informed critic is advocating ignoring or discarding evolution.  Whether it can be classed with “fundamental understandings of the natural world” must not be merely assumed, but those on the design side of the controversy (see 01/24/2005 and 11/30/2004 entries and Evolution News blog) want evolution to be taught.  You can’t understand 20th century history or science without it.  Charlie’s little world cruise makes a nice story, and Haeckel’s little drawings make nice cartoons to get the teens to laugh.  Yes, teach evolution – all of it, the good, the bad, and the ugly (see 01/17/2005, 12/30/2004, 11/29/2004, 11/19/2004 and 12/14/2004 entries, and more going back 5 years in these pages).  Teach especially the parts the Darwin Party doesn’t want you to know.  Here; we’ll help.  Try our draft outline of a suggested eight-part comprehensive curriculum on evolution: Click here to continue—(Visited 20 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Zuma to lead SA team to US-Africa summit

first_img24 July 2014President Jacob Zuma will lead a South African delegation to the first United States-Africa Leaders’ Summit taking place in Washington on 5 and 6 August, Communications Minister Faith Muthambi said on Thursday.Speaking to journalists in Pretoria following the Cabinet’s latest fortnightly meeting, Muthambi said the summit was expected to provide a boost for Africa’s regional integration initiatives, as well as for various African Union (AU) economic development programmes.The White House made the announcement that US President Barack Obama would host the summit in January, saying that he looked forward to “further strengthen[ing] ties with one of the world’s most dynamic and fastest-growing regions.“The summit will build on the progress made since the President’s trip to Africa last summer, advance the administration’s focus on trade and investment in Africa, and highlight America’s commitment to Africa’s security, its democratic development, and its people,” the White House said.There will also be meetings of US and African CEOs, as well as an African Growth and Opportunity Act (Agoa) ministerial meeting, both aimed at strengthening trade and investment between the US and Africa.Agoa, which enables 39 eligible sub-Saharan African countries to export most products duty-free to the United States, has seen total African exports to the US more than quadruple, and US exports to sub-Saharan Africa more than triple, since its inception in 2000In August, US Trade Representative Michael Froman told a two-day forum in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia that the US was looking to work with African experts and leaders on forging an improved “Agoa 2.0” before the expiry of its current version in 2015.Some members of the US Congress have questioned whether South Africa, being relatively developed in Africa, should continue to be included in Agoa. Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies, speaking to journalists ahead of Obama’s visit to the country last June, argued against this view, saying it would be detrimental for the US market if South Africa were excluded.“South Africa has been a beneficiary of Agoa, but we also think that Agoa is a very significant instrument to benefit the US, not least because it is a widely appreciated measure by the US, which builds the US a high degree of goodwill in its relations with other countries on the African continent,” Davies said.Around 43% of South Africa’s exports, totalling to about $4.6-billion, have entered the US under the Agoa programme and this, according to Davies, has helped support the development of the economy, notably in manufacturing.Elizabeth Thabethe, then deputy trade and industry minister – now deputy small business development minister – said at the time that Agoa should be developed into a programme that supported African integration more directly.“This is where we need to be innovative in defining mechanisms that support Africa’s integration,” Thabethe said, adding that larger, more integrated African markets would underpin growth and development in Africa, which in turn would encourage growth in US trade and investment to Africa.SAnews.gov.za and SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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ODNR adds more than 900 acres to Shawnee State Forest

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A Forest Legacy project in southern Ohio recently resulted in an addition of 929 acres of highly strategic forest land, an area known as the “Little Smokies of Ohio,” to Shawnee State Forest, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR).“By acquiring these ‘Little Smokies’ parcels, ODNR continues to show its commitment toward protecting and fostering the growth of Ohio’s forest lands,” said Robert Boyles, Ohio’s state forester. “These additional woodland acres will fill many of the largest gaps in the Shawnee State Forest, and by using proper management, will provide Ohioans with healthy forests, which create ideal habitats for all of our wildlife, offer countless recreational activities and produce the timber products that contribute to our state’s continued economic growth.”The 63,747-acre Shawnee State Forest includes Ohio’s only state-designated wilderness area and surrounds the 1,168-acre Shawnee State Park. Together, they are the largest contiguous protected forest in Ohio. The project complements partner efforts such as The Nature Conservancy’s plan to connect their nearby 17,123-acre Edge of Appalachia Preserve to Shawnee State Forest through the Sunshine Corridor.“It’s really satisfying to see the pieces of the puzzle coming together at the Shawnee State Forest as we work to connect it with our Edge of Appalachia Preserve,” said Bill Stanley, assistant Ohio director of The Nature Conservancy. “There was no question that The Nature Conservancy should assist in making this deal a reality. Having this land under ODNR management will allow the forests to mature, increasing their value to water quality and habitat.”“The Ohio chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation (NWTF) is thrilled about helping provide 929 acres of new hunting access. This is a great step forward, and it fits perfectly with our ‘Save the Habitat. Save the Hunt.’ initiative,” said Lee Crocker, Ohio regional biologist with the NWTF. “Ohio has a critical need to provide more hunting and outdoor recreation access, and the NWTF volunteers are working hard to accomplish this. These additional acres will create excellent brood and nesting habitat for wild turkeys and will provide important habitat for a whole host of other wildlife species.”This acquisition is also important for recreation and tourism, as it protects the routes of popular hiking trails (including the North Country National Scenic Trail, American Discovery Trail and the Buckeye Trail) and scenic drives (like the Scenic Scioto Heritage State Byway and Shawnee State Forest’s Driving Tour Loop). Finally, the project supports the Ohio Forest Legacy Program’s core goal of protecting working forests in the most productive counties for timber statewide.The protection of this important forest land was made possible through a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Forest Legacy Program and funding from The Nature Conservancy and NWTF. Other supporting partners include the ODNR divisions of Parks and Wildlife; North Country Trail Association; American Discovery Trail Society; and the Buckeye Trail Association.The ODNR Division of Forestry works to promote the wise use and sustainable management of Ohio’s public and private woodlands. To learn more about Ohio’s woodlands, visit forestry.ohiodnr.gov.last_img read more

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Was calf CPR a miracle or another day on the farm?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Was it an early Easter miracle or just another day on the farm? Michelle Ramseyer thinks it might have been a little bit of both.Michelle and her husband Jeff raise around 200 cattle in an organic rotational grazing system with neighboring grain farmer, Dean McIlvaine. The Ramseyers provide the livestock and the labor while enhancing the fertility and controlling weeds on McIvaine’s farm ground for their Lone Pine Pastures operation in Wayne County, Michelle said.Michelle and Jeff Ramseyer“He actually owns the properties we have cattle on. We have 110 head of cattle and close to 80 calves on the ground now. We are a grass-fed operation. We started back in 2014 when we got the cattle. Dean is an organic crop farmer and all of the cattle are raised on organic grass. We do not feed anything other than hay and grass. Dean needed more fertility because his crops weren’t growing well. Jeff went to him and said ‘Hey we can get you more fertility, why don’t we start a grass fed operation?’ That is what we did,” Michelle said. “Our first 40 heifers were delivered in December of 2014 and we calved in March-April of 2015 and have gone from there. We graze on his cropland and we have about 200 acres of permanent pastures we will start here in another couple of weeks. We market our beef to Heinen’s Grocery Store and we have freezer beef we sell in the community though Facebook. We also have organic raised pork in an open barn with outside access.”On Palm Sunday, Jeff and Michelle went out to the pastures to check for calves in the farm ATV.“I go out with him a couple times a week. I attend ATI as a Dairy Science major, so I’m busy with that and we have four kids,” Michelle said. “It was Sunday and he wanted me to go out with him. We had had four calves that were born and he wanted to figure out which momma belonged to which calf and look at some of the cows.”That is when something caught Michelle’s attention.“We rolled up on the Kubota to a cow and a calf that were laying in an old hay pile. I said to Jeff, ‘She is laying on that calf.’ And he says, ‘No, she’s not. She’s fine.’ The momma jumped up as we got a little closer the calf just laid there,” she said. “Jeff jumped off the Kubota realizing, ‘Well, Michelle’s right.’ He ran to the calf and he picked the calf up and it was still warm. He kind of blew on its face and tried to shake it and I just went into ‘mom mode’ I think. I ran off the Kubota over to them and started mouth-to-mouth on this calf. Jeff said the first time I blew in the calf’s mouth his eyes about popped out of his head. Two more times I blew into his mouth and he started breathing on his own. He was laid out flat. His tongue was out — his tongue was blue.”The timing was extremely fortunate.“I just knew that he needed to start breathing and if he was still warm, he was suffocating. His head was under the cow and the rest of the body was not under the cow, his head was. So I knew he was suffocating, that’s the only reason he was like that. I just thought we got to get air into his lungs, and how else do you get air into lungs? I’ve taken child CPR courses and adult CPR courses. So I just did that and I also pounded on the side of his chest where I knew his heart was a couple times just to stimulate him and it must have worked because he’s up and viable now,” Michelle said. “So we happened upon this calf at the right time, because in our situation, normally what happens is we lose very little calves. But in any farming situation, you lose a calf and have no idea why this calf died. Especially beef. With dairy you usually know, but with beef all of the sudden you’ll happen on a calf and won’t know why it’s dead. So we’re very lucky.”Since then, the calf seems to be doing remarkably well.“It took him probably about 10 minutes after we got him going and he was up and wobbly and walked about 300 yards with his mom and started nursing. So we were excited we actually saved him and Jeff checked him yesterday and this morning and says he’s still nursing and he still looks good, so we’re hoping that there wasn’t any other damage,” Michelle said. “We really watch the health of our animals. It’s very important to us. I am a big softie when it comes to our calves. Those are my babies and they’re like my kids. They might not let me pet them, but we really watch our animals for care.”And while calf CPR may be a bit out of the ordinary for the farm, doing whatever it takes to care for animals in the best possible way is standard procedure for the Ramseyers and for livestock farms in general.“Right after that calf being revived, we were driving around again and the calves do this all the time — they’re laid out flat, you roll up to them and you’re like, ‘What happened?’ And they’re just laying in the sun sunning themselves,” she said. “Our hearts go in our throat every time we see an animal that is not doing well, or we think is not doing well. That type of situation happens on the farm.”Whether large or small, extreme measures for animal care are a part of every successful livestock operation. Improper animal care is more than an emotional issue, it is simply bad business for the farm.“We do it everyday. There are times when I get frustrated because we have to go check cows. Sometimes, the cows come before our family. That’s just the way it happens. There are dairy farmers out there that miss Christmas mornings. We miss family get-togethers because we have a situation at the farm we have to take care of and that’s first. We miss ball games because we have to go put fence up or we have to get cows in or we have a cow having a calf that needs assistance, and guess what, sorry kids, we’ll get you to your game but we might miss it. That’s our way of life, that’s what we do,” Michelle said. “For those people that don’t have that experience and have questions, I know not only us, but several farms that say, ‘Come, I’ll show you. I’ll show you what I do. Come to our farm. You have a question, we’ll show you what we do.’ We don’t have time to take tours every day, but we want people to realize that we take care of our animals. No matter what, we take care of our animals. That’s first. And sometimes it’s before family because that’s what pays our bills. It’s well worth it. We love what we do or we wouldn’t be doing it.”The lifestyle on the farm requires hard work, steadfast dedication to the animals and their welfare and even, on occasion, some heroic CPR. But, miracle or not, it is just another day on the farm.last_img read more

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