Gallic farce amidst golf’s gender battle

first_imgThe Royal and Ancient Golf Club’s decision to allow women to enter the Open Championship will provide the likes of Michelle Wie, teeing off in her first professional tournament as the announcement was made, with the chance to challenge their male counterparts directly.The move is progressive and open-minded, in fact the very nature of an ‘Open’ Championship dictates that gender should be a side issue, but was always likely to ruffle a few feathers.Frenchman Jean Van de Velde, last witnessed wading through Carnoustie’s Barry Burn on the final hole of the 1999 Open Chamionship, offered the most absurd reaction The piqued 39 year old claimed, in protest, that he would attempt to qualify for next year’s Women’s British Open at Royal Birkdale: “I am definitely going to approach them to get an application and if they let me play in the qualifying event then I will. I’ll even wear a kilt and shave my legs.”We thought we’d seen the last of his legs in Barry Burn, but Van de Velde, it seems, is serious. despite the fact that no female professionals except Wie have expressed even a long-term thought of competing with men, he insists that a line must be drawn in the sand trap.”Those guys playing in The Open a hundred and fifty years ago and who won it three or four times must be spinning in their graves. My whole point is where do we draw the line?” Van de Velde asked after hacking his way through a seven-over 78 at the Volvo Masters in Spain (a men’s tournament). “If we accept that women can enter our tournaments, then it applies that men can play with women.”Maybe the Frenchman is willing to play the fool to provoke discussion of wider issues about the separation of women’s and men’s events and the spirit of competition, but we simply can’t take his suggestions seriously. Someone of the calibre of Tiger Woods, for instance, would never consider such an absurd or unsporting suggestion as entering a women’s event, and the prospect of Van de Velde doing so is uninspiring. It smacks of a cheap publicity stunt by an out-of-form player who feels threatened by the emergence of women with the ability to humiliate him yet further, this time on a golf course.Besides, Van de Velde is overlooking the Ladies’ Golf Union “gender policy”: “It shall be a condition of any competition organised by the Ladies’ Golf Union that players must be of the female gender.” Looks like the Philips Ladyshave can be put away for a rainy day, then. There is also the clause: “If there is uncertainty as to a player’s gender then, in order to ensure fair competition, a member of the committee may ask a player to provide proof of gender to a medical expert” – and Van de Velde certainly wouldn’t make the cut on this front.The crux of the matter is this; an influx of dominant men into women’s events would damage the game irreparably, whereas the likes of Wie or Annika Sorenstam would have to play “up” to the standard of the field in order to compete. The argument simply cannot be made in the opposite direction. What is more, players like Wie and Sorenstam competing with men would surely help to dissolve misogynistic condescension and inspire young girls with the confidence and ambition to follow in their footsteps.  ARCHIVE: 5th week MT 2005last_img read more

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Ocean City Intermediate School Awarded Sustainable Jersey for Schools Grant

first_imgOcean City Intermediate School Awarded Sustainable Jersey for Schools Grant to Fund ‘Promoting Student Health and Wellness by Ensuring Access to Healthy Drinking Water Throughout the School Day’Sustainable Jersey for Schools representatives announced that Ocean City Intermediate School has been awarded a Sustainable Jersey for Schools Small Grant. Ocean City Intermediate School is one of 30 schools in New Jersey to receive a Sustainable Jersey for Schools Small Grant funded by the New Jersey Department of Health in this funding cycle.  “We are extremely excited about receiving this grant.  It will help us to continue our message of sustainability and conservation that began with our edible garden grants and continued with our sustainability grant last year,” explains the Ocean City Intermediate School Principal, Geoff Haines. “We look forward to continuing to educate the OCIS family about conservation and staying healthy.”  The Ocean City Intermediate School will use this year’s grant money to pursue a project that will ensure access to healthy drinking water for all students. The school plans to purchase and install three water bottle filling stations in locations easily accessible to students, staff and visitors. The stations have built-in water filtration in order to replace the old, existing water fountains.  The grant proposal was written up by the ‘OCIS Green Team,’ which is constantly working on new ideas to advance the school’s resources and ability to conserve. The health and science teachers are excited to incorporate the water stations into their lesson plans, as well as the prospect of guest lecturers. Superintendent Dr. Kathleen Taylor was thrilled to hear about the grant, sharing how, “the District is always looking for ways to improve the health of our students and the impact our schools have on the community. This grant is one more step forward in our initiative!” Currently, 207 districts and 516 schools have registered to work toward Sustainable Jersey for Schools certification. “Sustainable schools are healthy schools, and schools that promote health and well-being will see benefits,” said Donna Drewes, who co-directs Sustainable Jersey with Randall Solomon. “These grants funded by the New Jersey Department of Health will support schools as they tackle important health and wellness actions.” The New Jersey Department of Health is funding the grants through its Maternal and Child Health Services Title V Block Grant. Technical assistance to grant recipients will be provided by three of the Department of Health’s regional partners: AtlantiCare (south), EmPoWER Somerset (central) and The Center for Prevention and Counseling (north). About The Ocean City Intermediate SchoolThe Ocean City Intermediate School (OCIS) is made up of students in grades four, five, six, seven, and eight who reside in Ocean City and Sea Isle City, along with students that are part of the School Choice Program. Like the district, OCIS is “committed to excellence.” The school is supported by a community that recognizes the effort to focus upon what is best for all of the students in Ocean City. OCIS has enjoyed a rich history of academic and co-curricular excellence that is a result of the hard work and partnership between our staff, the community, and our parents/guardians. Our educators are focused on respect, hard work, dynamic lessons and modeling that align with their curriculum under the New Jersey Student Learning Standards.About Sustainable Jersey for SchoolsSustainable Jersey for Schools is a certification program for public schools in New Jersey. It was launched by Sustainable Jersey, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that provides tools, training and financial incentives to support and reward municipalities and schools as they pursue sustainability programs. Currently, 207 school districts and 516 schools in New Jersey are participating in the program.Sustainable Jersey for Schools is underwritten by the New Jersey School Boards Association (NJSBA), the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities Clean Energy Program, The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation and the New Jersey Education Association (NJEA). The 2016 Sustainable Jersey for Schools small grants program is funded by the PSEG Foundation, NJEA, the Gardinier Environmental Fund and the New Jersey Department of Health. Founding Sponsor contributors are South Jersey Gas, New Jersey Natural Gas and NJM Insurance Group. Bayer Foundation is a Silver Sponsor and Jersey Central Power and Light and Spiezle Architectural Group are Bronze Sponsors.Sustainable Jersey for Schools Program partners include: New Jersey School Boards Association (NJSBA), New Jersey Education Association (NJEA), New Jersey Association of School Administrators (NJASA), New Jersey Association of School Business Officials (NJASBO), New Jersey Parent Teacher Association (NJPTA), New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA), New Jersey School Buildings and Grounds Association (NJSBGA) and The Sustainability Institute at The College of New Jersey (TCNJ.)Website:          www.SustainableJerseySchools.comTwitter:            www.twitter.com/SJ_SchoolsFacebook:       www.facebook.com/SustainableJerseyInstagram:       https://instagram.com/sustainable_jersey/Linked In:        www.linkedin.com/company/sustainable-jersey The Ocean City Intermediate School just participated in the “Kindness Challenge.”last_img read more

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Staggered Approach to Phase 2 of Reopening for Palm Beach County?

first_imgThose missing the big screen will be happy to hear that movie theaters will also be allowed to open their doors at this stage, albeit at 33 percent of their maximum capacity.For the third and final portion of phase 2, businesses included up to that point will be allowed to increase their occupancy to 75 percent.However, it is important to note that not all entertainment venues will be allowed to reopen in the governor’s second phase.The following types of businesses would have to wait a while longer: arcades, auditoriums, bars, bingo parlors, casinos, concert houses, hookah and cigar bars, sports lounges, nightclubs and adult entertainment venues.County officials hope to discuss their plan at the Sept. 1 board meeting. Palm Beach County officials are gearing up to head into phase 2 of Gov. Ron DeSantis’ reopening open, and it will apparently be a more staggered approach than originally thought.Last week, West Palm Beach television station WPEC obtained a draft plan through a public records request and a county email from Director of Emergency Management Bill Johnson.The plan, which county officials could send to DeSantis in the coming days, reveals a gradual reopening, rather than a one-size-fits-all approach. To that end, the first part of phase 2 could potentially include allowing venues for services such as acupuncture, body piercing, massage therapy, and tanning salons and tattoo parlors to begin operating first. Escape rooms would also be under that first part.The second part would see the reopening of pool halls, bowling alleys, skating centers, trampoline centers, and other entertainment venues at 25 percent capacity.I will be holding a press conference at 5:00 PM to announce my SAFE. SMART. STEP-BY-STEP. Plan to Re-Open Florida. Watch live on https://t.co/FBjm0K60MW. pic.twitter.com/NkXDiCkiiF— Ron DeSantis (@GovRonDeSantis) April 29, 2020last_img read more

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