Halo Anniversary reverts to original graphics with a button press

first_imgWe first started hearing about the HD update the original Halo Xbox game was undergoing back in February. Then Microsoft started hinting at it and showed a demo at E3, but we haven’t really got to see any extended segments of gameplay from Halo: Combat Evolved Anniversary until now.The video above has just been released and includes gameplay from the E3 build. The main focus of the walkthrough is showing off the updated visuals and the fact this is the exact same gameplay and campaign we were all enjoying a decade ago.AdChoices广告343 Industries, who were tasked with updating the game for Microsoft, managed to update the look without effecting the gameplay by using a hardware trick. They figured out a way to run the original game engine at the same time as the new one supplying the HD visuals. So in effect this is a true run through of the original, just with a veil of HD painted over the top. To prove that is the case, 343 has included Classic Mode, which at the push of a button reverts the graphics back to the original 2001 version. This is a nice option to have, as once you’ve become accustomed to seeing all games in HD, it’s easy to forget what we used to class as cutting edge graphics. The fact it is accessible on a button press means you can easily check out how the more detailed areas used to look. The water especially has seen a major improvement, as have the effects such as water splashes and dust.The other feature of this game that’s going to get Halo fans excited is the ability to play co-op over Xbox Live. We can imagine Live is going to be buzzing for months when the game gets released on November 15.One final point to make is the visuals on display in the video are now several months out of date, meaning when the game does ship it will look even better than it already does here.last_img read more

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AMD closes OS Research Center and with it support for Linux

first_imgAMD announced last month that it was set to reduce its workforce by 15%, which amounts to around 1,700 jobs. At the time we didn’t know where those job cuts would come from, but now it is becoming both clear and surprising who AMD is deciding to let go.AMD is in the business of making chips, which it relies on selling to generate revenue. But in order for those chips and associated hardware to sell there needs to be support in place across multiple operating systems. With that in mind, AMD created the Operating System Research Center (OSRC) in Dresden, Germany back in 2006.OSRC’s goal was to be a center of excellence for operating systems, provide support for CPU designs within the company, implement new CPU designs, carry out research and development for operating systems, and be the engineers on hand to help partners using AMD chips. In other words, a key part of the company and also the place where developers worked to support the use of AMD on the Linux platform.With that in mind it was surprising to find out AMD has apparently decided to close the Dresden OSRC facility. That means a number of staff working on supporting the Linux kernel have also been dismissed, some of whom have confirmed this via the Gmane mailing list.AMD is making staff cuts due to the tough economy it is working within, but it doesn’t make much sense to cut internal support for operating systems. There are still thought to be OSRC staff located in Austin, Texas, but the majority of Linux support was handled by roughly 25 staff out of the Dresden office.Those staff will easily find new jobs elsewhere due to their experience and skill sets, but they likely won’t be working on supporting AMD chips anymore. So this really doesn’t seem like an intelligent decision by AMD, does it?More at ExtremeTech and The H Openlast_img read more

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