Oxford Students Protest India’s Citizenship Amendment Act

first_imgProtests against the bill erupted in cities and at universities across India. During a protest at Jamia Millia Islamia University in Delhi, police were accused of firing tear gas at the library, locking the gates of the university’s campus, and using batons on students. Excessive police force is also believed to have been used at a number of other universities. Those attending the event joined protesters across the world, expressing solidarity with students who had been subject to police brutality as they carried out demonstrations in universities across India. Yesterday students gathered outside the Radcliffe Camera to protest the Citizenship Amendment Act, a bill passed in India’s Parliament which has been widely criticised as Islamophobic. By Tuesday at 8:00 am the statement had received more than300 signatures by members and alumni of Oxford University. “OIS celebrates India’s unity in diversity; we are saddened thatthis spirit of unity is under threat, and we hope that the right to peacefulprotest is upheld.” #JamiaProtests #JamiaMilliaUniversity @adilhossain pic.twitter.com/D9ynVJ2wzK— Tania Saeed (@taniasaeed) December 17, 2019 A statement released by the Oxford India Society said: “OxfordIndia Society stands in solidarity with our fellow students at universitycampuses across India who are protesting against the unjust CitizenshipAmendment Act, and we condemn police brutality against these protestors.center_img The protest outside the Radcliffe Camera, which endured the rain this afternoon, was attended by approximately one hundred despite term ending for undergraduates last week. Placards at the event read “selective democracy is not democracy”, “trust anyone but Delhi Police” and “unconditional solidarity with Jamia, Amu, DU [Delhi University] and others”. Another statement open for signature by Oxford students alsocalled for an end to violence against those protesting, as well as criticisingthe CAA: “We, the students, scholars and alumni of the University of Oxford,are in solidarity with students exercising their fundamental right to dissentand protest across India.“We condemn the violence unleashed on students in Jamia Millia Islamia (NewDelhi), Aligarh Muslim University (Aligarh), Delhi University (New Delhi),Cotton University (Assam) and other educational institutions. The use of policeforce against students exercising their fundamental right to protest inuniversity spaces and elsewhere is a direct attack on the foundations of ademocratic society. We demand an immediate end to all forms of violence againstthe protesting students and call for accountability of those responsible.“Over the last week, we have seen many peaceful protests and demonstrationsacross India against the Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019. The Act stipulatespreferential treatment to religious minorities from Pakistan, Bangladesh andAfghanistan in the process of acquiring Indian citizenship, while explicitlyexcluding Muslims from its purview. This explicit and blatant exclusion ofMuslims from citizenship upends the long-standing fundamental ideals of equality,liberty, pluralism and secularism enshrined in the Constitution of India. Welend our voices in support of the fight against this immoral andunconstitutional law and call for its immediate withdrawal.“As we watch, with extreme concern, the events unfolding in India, we lend ourunconditional support for the students and others peacefully taking to thestreets to fight injustice.” “We demand cessation of violence by the policeand their complete withdrawal from the university premises.“We demand an immediate, independent, and robustinvestigation into the abuse of power by the Delhi Police, Uttar PradeshPolice, and the Central Reserve Police Force.“We demand that student protestors be allowed tocontinue to protest peacefully in exercise of their fundamental rights underthe Indian Constitution without any threat of use of force by the police orother law enforcement agencies.“We call upon officers of the Indian Police andAdministrative Services to fulfill their duty to uphold the Constitution ofIndia, and to resist any political demand to act in abuse of the powers thathave been conferred upon them; and, to ensure police forces under their commandact strictly in accordance with the constitutional, legal and ethicalconstraints that bind them.“We call on the Minister of Home Affairs, Mr.Amit Shah, to immediately take these necessary steps to curb police brutality,or resign.” As well as at Oxford, today students gathered in protest ata number of campuses across the UK and the world including Harvard, Yale andMIT. A statement was released on behalf of students and alumni protesting atAmerican universities. The statement criticised the use of force by policeresponding to the peaceful protests, and made a number of demands of the Indiangovernment: The Citizenship (Amendment) Act passed through India’s Parliament on 11th December this year. The bill is designed to enable the provision of citizenship as a right to religious minorities from Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan who have suffered from, or who stand the risk of suffering from religious persecution. However, the bill specifically nominates six religions as being eligible for citizenship: Hindus, Sikhs, Buddhists, Jains, Parsis, and Christians. The bill has been criticised for its omission of Muslim refugees, which violates India’s constitutional commitment to secularism.last_img read more

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UK local government funds criticise Barclays over executive pay

first_imgThe Local Authority Pension Fund Forum (LAPFF) has said it will vote against Barclay’s executive remuneration plan at today’s annual general meeting (AGM), while attacking its decision for Sir John Sunderland to lead the selection of the bank’s new chairman.The forum, a shareholder voting group for 60 local authority funds with more than £120bn (€146bn) in assets, said it believed institutional shareholder pressure was the only meaningful way to spur change at the bank.Sunderland is currently non-executive director at the bank, and former head of the remuneration committee, which came under severe criticism from shareholders for excessive pay.Councillor Kieran Quinn, who chairs the forum, said: “Sir John Sunderland has fortunately recognised it is inappropriate for him to serve as chair of the remuneration committee, but how can it be appropriate for him to lead the selection of Barclay’s new chair? “It appears that a continuing series of no votes by institutional shareholders is one of the few options open for meaningful engagement at Barclays.”The re-election of Sunderland and planned remuneration are two of the bank’s proposals expected to be rejected by the Forum and fellow institutions at today’s AGM.Pensions & Investment Research Consultants (PIRC), a proxy-voting service, has advised its members to follow suit.Standard Life Investments (SLI), asset manager and institutional shareholder, also denounced the bank’s remuneration policy.Owning 1.92% of the bank on behalf of its clients, SLI said it did not take the decision to reject the remuneration report lightly.Alison Kennedy, stewardship director at the manager, said: “We appreciate there were competitive pressures. Nevertheless, we are unconvinced the amount of the 2013 bonus pool was in the best interests of shareholders.“The board has stated its intention of reducing the compensation to net income ratio over the medium term. We support this intention, and it is important that, over time, the board demonstrates convincingly this will be achieved.”A spokesman for the LAPFF added that, while Barclays was a high-profile example, it was the tip of the iceberg for the problems in the financial sector.“The LAPFF has a long history of raising governance concerns at Barclays and at banks in general, going back to the LIBOR scandal, executive remuneration and accounting standards,” he said.“It is clear Barclays is the tip of the iceberg of dissatisfaction from pension funds.”last_img read more

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UN secretary general voices concern at rights violations and rising crime during visit to Guatemala

first_img 24 Views   no discussions Tweet Sharing is caring! Share Sharecenter_img NewsPrint UN secretary general voices concern at rights violations and rising crime during visit to Guatemala by: – March 17, 2011 GUATEMALA CITY, Guatemala — Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Wednesday expressed appreciation of Guatemala’s contribution to United Nations peacekeeping operations, but also voiced alarm at the worsening rate of crime, insecurity and human rights violations in the Central American country.“Guatemalan troops are serving with peacekeepers in Haiti and in conflict zones such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sudan and Côte d’Ivoire,” said Ban at a joint news conference with President Alvaro Colom in the country’s capital, Guatemala City.“A distinguished Guatemalan, Edmond Mulet, is my Special Representative in Haiti. I am especially pleased that a number of Guatemalan women are serving in UN peacekeeping operations.“I value this contribution, but I know it has taken a toll. Tomorrow I will solemnly dedicate a monument to the Guatemalan UN peacekeepers who died while serving the cause of peace. The only way to truly honour their sacrifice is to carry on our work for peace, security and justice, here in Guatemala and around the world,” said the secretary-general.Ban told reporters that at a meeting with members of the Guatemalan cabinet, he had expressed alarm over rising crime and insecurity and that he was particularly concerned about abuses of human rights.“Ending impunity is critical to protecting all Guatemalans from violence,” he said, adding that the UN will provide additional support.“We have to foster security for all Guatemalans and their children. I am sure the people of Guatemala agree they did not end 36 years of armed conflict only to see violence take other forms. Now it is time to end all violence,” said Ban.The secretary-general recalled that Guatemala is known throughout the world for its ecological diversity, its rich culture, and its proud history.“Our shared challenge today is to ensure that Guatemala also earns a reputation as a haven of justice, respect for human rights, and true security. We have serious work ahead,” he said.He described his talks with Colom as “constructive,” saying they covered important issues of concern to both of them, including insecurity, poverty, violence against women, regional issues, and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the global commitments to reducing extreme and boosting social-economic progress by the target date of 2015.He said that Colom and he were in full agreement on the importance of the work of the International Commission against Impunity in Guatemala (CICIG).“I expressed the UN’s strong support for CICIG and Commissioner Francisco Dall’Anese,” Ban said.The secretary-general also met Nobel Peace Prize laureate Rigoberta Menchu and was due to have bilateral with several heads of state in Central America, including those of Costa Rica, Belize, El Salvador, Panama, the Dominican Republic and Honduras. He was also slated to launch the UN Peacebuilding Fund’s engagement in Guatemala.Source: Caribbean News Now Sharelast_img read more

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Waiting game

first_imgStudents gathered for hours along Trousdale Parkway to line up for a pre-screening of the first episode in the fifth season of the hit HBO television show, Game of Thrones. The Special Events Committee asked students to reenact scenes from the show for free items such as HBO cups, Game of Thrones T-shirts and mix tapes.last_img

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