Vulfpeck Members Release Debut ‘The Fearless Flyers’ EP

first_imgLast week, Vulf Records mysteriously released two tracks under a moniker The Fearless Flyers. The new band, comprised of Vulfpeck bassist Joe Dart, guitarist Cory Wong, drummer Nate Smith, and Snarky Puppy guitarist Mark Lettieri, put out two songs on Monday and Wednesday, generating huge response to the funky-fresh releases. The new project, which is produced, composed, and mixed by the “Vulfmon” himself, Jack Stratton (bandleader/multi-instrumentalist of Vulfpeck), will be pressed on a limited supply of 12″ vinyl—though the campaign to reserve your own copy closed on Friday. From the time of the announcement, it was not clear whether or not The Fearless Flyers would release a full record, or if only the two songs would appear on the pressing.Then, on Friday, without much promotion outside of a few ambiguous posts on Vulfpeck’s social media pagges, The Fearless Flyers released the full EP on Bandcamp. In addition to the previously released “Aces of Aces” and “Under the Sea / Flyers Drive”, the self-titled debut record includes four additional tracks.“Introducing the Fearless Flyers” showcases the tight musicianship between the four players, providing the style of playing that fans of Vulfpeck crave from the band’s earlier days. A sped-up, jammed-out, funkified rendition of Stevie Wonder’s “Signed, Sealed, Delivered” appears on the EP, featuring guitarist Blake Mills and gospel performer Sandra Crouch. A secondary version of “Barbara” also appears on the record, featuring Sandra Crouch again on the tambourine, as a follow-up to Vulfpeck’s 2012 Vollmich version of the song.The six-track presentation closes with “Bicentennial”, a clear continuation of the closing groove from Vulfpeck’s 2017 “Grandma” from Mr. Finish Line. Vulfpeck’s soulful original version of the song features Antwaun Stanley on vocals, David T. Walker on guitar, and James Gadson on drums and closes with a 45-second groove that left fans wanting more. The Fearless Flyers’ “Bicentennial” is the extension of that groove and it features Tedeschi Trucks Band’s Elizabeth Lea on trombone and the voice of Jack Stratton as the “sibilant announcer.”With clear ties between Vulfpeck and The Fearless Flyers, it’s safe to say that the new band is a real thing–and we want more. You can own a copy of The Fearless Flyers today for $6, if you didn’t already reserve a copy of the vinyl, here.<a href=”http://vulf.bandcamp.com/album/the-fearless-flyers”>The Fearless Flyers by The Fearless Flyers</a>In other news, Apple recently released a new commercial for the Apple Pay feature, using Vulfpeck’s “Back Pocket” as the soundtrack. The commercial is in international circulation, positioning the song to get stuck in even more heads across the globe.Vulfpeck has a light year ahead of them, with only four dates on the calendar so far. Following a festival appearance at Sweetwater 420 and two nights in New Orleans, the funk quartet will head to Morrison, Colorado, for their first-ever headlining performance at the legendary Red Rocks Amphitheatre. With KNOWER and Kamasi Washington also on the bill, the 4/27 show is shaping up to be one of the most exciting to date. Head here for more information.last_img read more

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House masters appointed

first_imgHarvard College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds, the Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and of African and African-American Studies, today (March 26) announced the appointment of three House masters. Rakesh and Stephanie Khurana will become master and co-master of Cabot House. Douglas Melton and Gail O’Keefe will assume those roles at Eliot House, while Christie McDonald and Michael David Rosengarten will oversee Mather House.Last month, James L. Cavallaro, clinical professor of law at Harvard Law School (HLS) and executive director of the HLS Human Rights Program, and his wife, Nadejda Marques, were appointed interim master and co-master of Harvard College’s Currier House for the 2010-11 academic year.“I’m tremendously pleased that such outstanding scholars — and talented, enthusiastic members of the Harvard community — will be taking on these important and influential roles,” Hammonds said. “Each of the new masters — Professors Rakesh Khurana, Doug Melton, and Christie McDonald — are leading scholars in their fields. But more important than their scholarly contributions, they are, alongside their spouses, wonderful, outgoing people who have a passion for working with and mentoring students.“Harvard’s House system is both unique and has been central to the College’s undergraduate experience since the 1930s,” Hammonds continued. “Rakesh, Doug, and Christie will live up to the traditions of their many predecessors, while bringing new life and ideas to Cabot, Eliot, and Mather Houses. Please join me in welcoming them to each of these House communities.”Professor Rakesh Khurana and Stephanie Khurana (Cabot House)Rakesh Khurana is the Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development at the Harvard Business School. He teaches a doctoral seminar on “Management and Markets and the Board of Directors and Corporate Governance” in the M.B.A. program.Khurana received his B.S. from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., and his A.M. in sociology and his Ph.D. in organization behavior from Harvard. Prior to attending graduate school, he worked as a founding member of Cambridge Technology Partners.His research uses a sociological perspective to focus on the processes by which elites and leaders are selected and developed. He has written extensively about the CEO labor market and business education.His wife, Stephanie, is acting executive director for the Tobin Project, an alliance of the nation’s leading academics committed to pursuing transformative ideas that improve the lives of fellow citizens. She previously was co-founder, CEO, and director of Surebridge Inc.She received a B.S. in applied economics from Cornell University, an M.B.A. from the Harvard Business School, and an M.P.P. from the Harvard Kennedy School. She has served on the Cornell Advisory Board for Dean of Students and the President’s Council of Cornell Women. Her career includes receipt of a “Top 40 Under 40” award from the Boston Business Journal. She also serves on the board of Step Into Art, a nonprofit that provides art education for inner-city children.The couple have three children: Sonia (13), Nalini (11), and Jai (7).Professor Douglas Melton and Gail O’Keefe (Eliot House)Douglas Melton is the Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences at Harvard and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He is also a co-director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, and has become a leading researcher and public advocate in stem cell research.He earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Illinois and then went to Cambridge University in England as a Marshall Scholar, where he received a B.A. in history and philosophy of science and a Ph.D. in molecular biology at Trinity College, Cambridge, and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology. He teaches undergraduates, graduate students, and medical students at Harvard in courses ranging from basic developmental biology to bioethics.As an educational consultant, Gail O’Keefe works with parents to help them gain an understanding of the learning issues that their children face, advocating for services, placement assistance, and working to improve parent-child relationships. She also works with EDCO, a voluntary collaborative of 21 urban and suburban school districts serving Greater Boston, to ensure that educational opportunities remain available for children in state custody.O’Keefe earned a B.S. in biology from the University of Connecticut, studied at Tufts University’s Department of Urban and Environmental Policy, and received an M.A. in applied developmental and educational psychology from Boston College.Professor Christie McDonald and Michael Rosengarten (Mather House)Christie McDonald, who grew up in New York City, received her B.A. from Mount Holyoke College (having previously studied for a year in Paris) and her Ph.D. from Yale University. She is the Smith Professor of French Language and Literature and professor of comparative literature in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, where she served as chair from 2000 to 2006. Her research and teaching focus on the dialogue of literature with the social sciences and the arts. Two of her most recent collaborative projects will be published this year, “Rousseau and Freedom” and “French Global: A New Approach to French Literary History.”A native of Montreal, Michael David Rosengarten is associate dean of the Center for Continuing Health Professional Education and associate professor of medicine at McGill University. He earned a bachelor of electrical engineering from McGill before moving to the University of Ottawa, where he received his M.D. degree. Since 1980, Rosengarten has held numerous appointments at McGill and the Montreal General Hospital. A longtime cardiologist specializing in electrophysiology, he combined his medical experience with his computer and Web skills to lead McGill’s continuing medical education in distance learning.The two have spent more than 15 years commuting between Montreal and Cambridge, often meeting at their home in northern Vermont near the Canadian border. They will reside together at Mather House. They have four grown children in Montreal, Seattle, Atlanta, and Lowell, Mass.last_img read more

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US Charges Venezuelan Chief Justice with Corruption and Money Laundering

first_imgBy Dialogo April 17, 2020 Maikel Moreno — the highest-ranking judge in Venezuela — was indicted on separate charges in Miami, Florida for money laundering and corruption on March 26, the same day that Nicolás Maduro and others in his regime were charged with narco-terrorism and other criminal charges.Moreno is believed to have doled out legal favors in exchange for millions of dollars in bribes paid through Miami and foreign bank accounts that he spent on chartered private jets, expensive watches, and other luxury goods in South Florida, federal prosecutors say in their affidavit.One example they cite was Moreno authorizing the Maduro regime’s seizure of a General Motors auto plant in Venezuela rather than keeping it open for thousands of workers.Ariana Fajardo Orshan, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida, said corrupt Venezuelan leaders like Moreno have for too long used South Florida to launder their money.Former Venezuelan intelligence chief Hugo Carvajal stands during his extradition hearing to U.S. at the High Court in Madrid, Spain, September 12, 2019. (Emilio (Naranjo / Reuters)“Whether it is million-dollar condos, very fancy yachts or private jets — all of this has become a part of our society in southern Florida,” Fajardo said. “This party is coming to an end.”Fajardo also announced that her office had already seized more than $450 million in bank accounts and assets in several cases involving more than a dozen Venezuelan defendants, including a former national treasurer.According to the criminal complaint, in 2014, Moreno told U.S. authorities in a visa application that he earned the equivalent of about $12,000 per year from his work in Venezuela. Yet for a span of four years — from 2012 to 2016 — Moreno’s U.S. bank records show about $3 million in his accounts, primarily from large transfers from shell corporations with foreign bank accounts.Fajardo said Moreno specialized in cases involving fraud and financial crimes so that he could take advantage of deep-pocketed business defendants willing to pay bribes for their freedom. She said the chief justice “received large bribes to authorize the dismissal of charges or the release from custody of multiple Venezuelans who literally stole billions of dollars from Venezuela’s state-owned oil proceeds.”Another former general pondering surrenderMeanwhile Hugo Carvajal, the former chief of Venezuela’s military intelligence unit, is discussing his possible surrender with U.S. authorities. Carvajal was among those charged with Maduro and other top regime officials with narco-terrorism.Carvajal, a former general and ally of the late Venezuelan leader Hugo Chávez, has been in hiding since a Spanish court in November approved his extradition to the United States. It was unclear when or if he would surrender.The Spanish police arrested the former spy chief in April 2019 at the request of U.S. authorities, but Spain’s High Court initially ruled that he should be released and his extradition request was denied. The court reversed that decision in November, prompting Carvajal to go into hiding. Since leaving Venezuela, Carvajal has denounced Maduro and given his support to Interim President Juan Guaidó.last_img read more

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SportMod Mayhem is Saturday at Dodge City Raceway Park

first_imgBy Lonnie WheatleyDODGE CITY, Kan. – It will most assuredly be an action-packed night at Dodge City Raceway Park this Saturday, Aug. 29 as the track hosts the second annual IMCA SportMod Mayhem special.While SportMods battle it atop the 3/8-mile clay oval for a $1,000 winner’s share, the night of racing action that goes green at 7:30 p.m. also includes Xtreme Motor Sports IMCA Modifieds, IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars and IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks.General admission is $15 with children 11 and under admitted free when accompanying a paid adult.For more information, contact the track at 620 225-3277 or check www.dodgecityraceway.com.last_img read more

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Syracuse thrives in blocking ahead of 2nd ACC weekend

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Freshman Leah Levert looks across the court as the ball is set, watching the hitter’s arm. Her core tightens as the hitter rises for the spike. She bends her knees for the jump. She extends her arms as she explodes off the ground.“You just have to get that block. You just have to,” Levert said.Most of the time, Levert and her teammates have. This season, SU (7-7, 0-2 Atlantic Coast Conference) has out-blocked every opponent it has faced. Head coach Leonid Yelin attributes his team’s blocking success to its height and athleticism, but said that the team must do a better job converting defense into offense if it is to win ACC games.And Syracuse will look to continue its blocking dominance when it travels to Notre Dame (3-10, 0-2) on Friday and Boston College (6-7, 1-1) on Sunday in the team’s second weekend of ACC play.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We cannot rely on one skill, doesn’t matter how good it is,” Yelin said. “We will continue trying to be (the) better (blocking) team because ultimately, better blocking brings the defense up too.” Through 14 games, SU has out-blocked opponents 156.5 to 80.5, led by middle blockers Levert and Lindsay McCabe. Additionally, the two have combined for more total blocks than the Orange’s opponents.Levert said blocking is an emotional individual experience, but said there are also critical technical aspects to the skill, such as watching the opposing hitter’s arm as she jumps for a hit.She also credited team blocking and communication as big reasons for SU’s early success on the block.“Our pin blockers are really good with communicating and encouraging you to get there and encouraging you to go up with them,” Levert said.The next step for the team is to incorporate blocking the ball into better team defense. Yelin said that the team’s height up front could hurt digging in the back row.“We are quick enough but we are not experienced enough,” he said. “We have to learn to read different situations better — what the hitter is going to do instead of just reacting.”Yelin compared mental volleyball to children learning to read a book — the more they practice, the easier it is to read. In volleyball, the more games the players play, the easier it is to anticipate where the ball is going.A good dig to the setter allows the team to stay in system and score more points and staying in the system is Yelin’s top priority.“When (you’re an) older player, you do a lot of things by just understanding what you have to do, trying to save your energy,” he said. “When you’re younger, you’re still relying on your physical ability.”The Orange has abundant youth and athletic ability. The 6-foot-2 Levert has played in 45 of SU’s 53 sets this season despite being a freshman.“It’s not only about honing your body,” Levert said of blocking, “but also making your body know what you’re supposed to do because that’s what your mind is telling it to do.”Levert is passionate and strong on the block because of her intensity and her “carnal side,” but she knows she can’t let it take over. This mental struggle is key for McCabe, too.The senior said that blocking requires a lot of effort, but players need to be more focused in order to channel that effort into good overall defense.“On an individual basis, everybody knows what they need to be ready to play,” McCabe said. “So just taking that time before starting warm-ups to be ready to compete and play at your highest level.” Comments Published on October 2, 2014 at 12:20 amlast_img read more

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