Mud, mirth and beyond

first_imgEver wondered what goes on in those bits of the festival that are rarely shown on TV? Months ago you were up at three in the morning to buy your one festival ticket. You bought all you needed for a weekend camping (one tent, two wellies, and a lot of baby wipes); you set up tent well away from the portaloo and made your way down to the main stage. So there you are with a crowd of expectant faces when Lucie Silvas appears. Disaster! You throw your hands up in frustration, scream with consternation and turn away in disgust. But wait. What do you see but a whole world of other stalls and stands? You’ve found the festival beyond the music.Of course not everyone must go through this strange but comforting ritual to discover the background delights of festivals. Most see them as they walk in, or read about it in the programme, or wake up with a hangover and only one sock in the middle of a circus. But sooner or later everyone comes to explore the other side.And it’s not just a set of empty diversions for those who got corporate tickets, or lost. The other attractions are what give a festival its colour and complexion. After all, they all have big bands, stages, fences, crowds and even bigger security guards. They all make lots of money, though they do give it to different people (Oxfam, Greenpeace and Richard Branson invariably). It’s what they have going on around all this that makes each festival individual and unique.The hippy granddaddy of the festival is, of course, Glastonbury. Originating, no doubt, in ancient times, Glastonbury has long been a centre of the slightly weird to the downright barmy. And the festival, while centering around the music, has a truly awesome amount of space devoted to every form of performing art imaginable, and a few beyond that.There are traditional and folk music acts, circuses, mimes, jugglers, stilt walkers, burger salesmen, hippy priests, and old women who will sell you homemade cookies at competitive prices. In the vast fields devoted to the great, the random, and the odd, you can discover unique politics, philosophies and religions. You can bask in the ludicrous, the self indulgent and the crazy. You can marvel at the talents, abilities and skills on display. You can wonder at why a man taught himself to juggle twelve balls at a time in a perspex box. Truly it is a celebration of the limits of mind, body and soul.As the first of the many fresh-faced festivals, the V Festival is the trendy, easy going, well off, new liberal, middle-class, mud-hating, blow-up sofa bringing place to be on one weekend in mid-August. Not as extensive as Glastonbury, the other side of the V festival is dominated by the absolute basics – food and beer.That’s not to say there aren’t a couple of smaller stages devoted to the up-and-coming or down-and-leaving bands of the day (where else are you likely to see a woman in a heart-shaped hat playing a xylophone?). Their funfair provides endless fun to the drunk and bored, and very reasonable prices if you happen to have lots of disposable income cluttering up your bank account.The skateboarders add a youthful edge (especially if you grew up in the late 1980s) and the padding and armour they wear just adds to the sense of danger and risk, when they stand about doing nothing all day. So, maybe not enlightenment but certainly a lightening of the wallet is the order of the day at V.And finally, the grown-up anarchist rocker enjoying his weekend before being an IT consultant again is the Leeds/Reading chaos. Here can be found plenty of stages, plenty of alcohol and plenty of weirdly, wonderfully and woefully dressed rock fans. Beer riots and tent fires are not unknown. Sporting takes the form of the bottle throw, the fifty metre crowd surf and the classic mud wrestling. All in good spirits (and bad lagers), Reading and Leeds festival-goers have a focus beyond that of the common man.And so, as we reflect on the past festival season and our brief tour, it seems Lucie Silvas has done us a great favour. Exploring the other side of festivals can be more than a way to pass the time, it can be an exploration of the true essence of a festival – get a load of people in a field and let them act like the music-loving crazy people that they are.ARCHIVE: 0th week MT 2005last_img read more

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A break-up letter from the Pac-10 to USC

first_imgIt’s not you, it’s me.All right, that’s not true — it is you. But breaking up is hard to do, and I’m new at this.Passing the torch · Oregon’s Jordan Holmes lifts LaMichael James after a touchdown in a game that saw the Ducks dethrone USC. – Dieuwertje Kast | Daily TrojanWe’ve been inseparable for what seems like forever. Whenever somebody mentioned “Pac-10,” they couldn’t help but bring up “USC.” As a perennial champion, you gave meaning to me as a conference. We had a run that could only be paralleled by Florida State and the ACC in the ’90s.But nothing gold can stay, and I think it’s time to call it quits.Everyone said this would be the year it would end between us. They said you were different this year and that someone would finally knock you off your pedestal. But all your buddies on campus faithfully said Pete Carroll would find a way to repeat yet again.But it’s become blatantly clear that you’ve changed this year. And Saturday proved that beyond a reasonable doubt.Look, I was willing to stand by you after the loss to Washington. It seemed just like any other year of our rocky relationship. Everyone said it was a disappointment, but it was nothing we hadn’t all seen before. It seemed like it would be just like last year when Oregon State caught you off guard, but you bounced back to finish the season in style.At worst, it appeared that we were destined for another memorable New Year’s Day date at the Rose Bowl. I know the students had grown tired of them, but I’m sure they all lust for those days now.However, these last few weeks showed us something was still wrong. And after what happened with Oregon, well, I just don’t know where we stand.What happened on Halloween in Eugene was surreal and still hard to compute. The 27-point margin of defeat from that loss was one point more than the combined margin of all of your losses since 2004. For all of your miscues, you could always say that you were never blown out and always had kept it close.Even more mystifying were the 391 yards rushing you gave up to the Ducks. That’s not a very USC-like performance, and there are few comparable efforts. The last time your defense looked like this was in 2005 when everyone clamored to call you the best team ever. But we learned that year that you can only go as far as your defense takes you, and that hasn’t been very far based on its performance the last three weeks.This doesn’t have to be all bad. Remember the good times?There was 2004, when you did the West Coast proud by running the table and winning a national championship. And who could forget all of those memorable non-conference matchups in which you more than lived up to your reputation? You helped raise my profile as a conference when I needed it most, and for that I am in your debt.When our run first started, I needed you. People said, “The Pac-10 is at its best when USC is strong,” and you helped give West Coast football some stability. Heck, when we first started our run, you shared the title with Washington State. Look at where the Cougars are now.We can still be friends, right? In fact, I’m still going to need you. Depending on what happens, I’ll still need you to stick up for me in the Holiday Bowl — or maybe even a BCS game, if you get your act together. Maybe a change of scenery would do you good after all those repetitive Rose Bowls.And there’s a possibility we could find our way back together at some point. People thought our run was over after your last loss in Eugene in 2007, but somehow we found a way back together.But for now, I hope you don’t mind if I see how things go with the Ducks. They’ve really impressed us and will probably be our representative for the Rose Bowl this year, so it’s for the best if I get to know them a little bit better. If you cross paths again, give Oregon my number and tell the Ducks we should talk.I know this is hard after seven years. But maybe we can just consider this a break and see what happens in 2010. Maybe you’ll come back rejuvenated and that old spark will be there again.But hey, we’ll always have Pasadena.“Tackling Dummy” runs Tuesdays. To comment on this article, visit dailytrojan.com or email Michael at [email protected]last_img read more

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Galante Earns 2012 Educator Award from Yale

first_imgLITTLE SILVER – Teacher Mandy Galante of Red Bank Regional High School’s Academy of Information Technology (AOIT) was recently honored by Yale University with its 2012 Yale Educator Award.Mandy Galante, a teacher at Red Bank Regional High School’s Academy of Information Technology (AOIT), at the school. She was recently awarded a 2012 Yale Educator Award after being nominated by a former student.Galante, a Little Silver resident, was nominated for the honor by her former student, Jared Katzman, now a freshman at Yale.Katzman was a very successful student at RBR and won several national team competitions under Galante’s tutelage in the Cyber Security and information technology areas.Galante is one of 90 teachers and counselors from 22 states and 12 countries who received the award.According to a press release from the Yale Office of Graduate Admissions, “The Yale Admissions Office attributes the exceptional quality of the Yale student body to educators like these who shape the students long before they attend Yale, and like to thank these and all educators for their ongoing efforts in motivating and supporting their students.”Galante was also named RBR’s and Monmouth County’s 2012 Teacher of the Year, as well as NJ’s Teacher of the Year by the Air Force Association. The latter sponsors the National CyberPatriot Competition which Galante’s students, including Jared Katzman, took the national championship.“It is Mrs. Galante’s teaching style and attitude that has rightfully been the root of merits received,” Katzman said of his former teacher and mentor. “She has created a unique and intensive program that brought national attention to a small public school … One thing is for sure, I would not be where I am without Mrs. Galante and she deserves every honor in the world.”last_img read more

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Rough start for Smokies at Showcase tournament

first_imgShane Poulsen scored the only goal for Trail.Braden Krogfoss took the loss in goal for the Smokies.Saturday, Cowichan Valley scored five third period markers to blast Trail 8-1.Leading 3-1 after two periods, Cowichan Valley scored four special teams goals — three on the power play and one shorthanded — to dump Trail.Team captain Garrett McMullen scored the lone goal for Trail.Lyndon Stanwood was in goal for Trail.Trail travels to the B.C. Interior for games Friday in Prince George and Saturday in Merritt.The first home game is Friday, September 21, against West Kelowna Warriors. It’s a been a slow start to the B.C. Hockey League season for the Trail Smoke Eaters.The Silver City squad was outscored 12-2 in dropping a pair of games to Merritt and Cowichan Valley during the BCHL’s Showcase tournament this weekend in Chilliwack.The Centennials scored twice in the first and third periods en route to the 4-1 victory Sunday.Penalty trouble did the Smokies in as power play goals by Sean Maktaak and another by Sebastien Pare did Trail in.last_img read more

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