Crowded Ballot Includes Balanced Budget Amendment

first_imgNovember 6, 2018By Eddie DrewsTheStatehouseFile.comINDIANAPOLIS—The race for the U.S. Senate may be dominating most election coverage, but Hoosiers will have a proposed state constitutional amendment to consider as well as candidates for other federal and state offices when they vote Tuesday.That constitutional amendment, which calls for a balanced budget, is either necessary for Indiana’s fiscal health or a waste of resources because the constitution already prohibits the state from going into debt.The proposed balanced budget amendment—which calls for the state to spend no more money than it takes in—passed the Indiana General Assembly twice, in 2015 and 2017. .Gov. Eric Holcomb, through his campaign committee, is encouraging a yes vote on the measure. It would take a two-thirds vote in both chambers to suspend the balanced budget requirement under the proposed amendment.But Rep. Ed DeLaney, D-Indianapolis, said the amendment is useless and will change nothing because lawmakers already pass balanced budgets. He said the amendment was created by Republicans to create an image that they are responsible and Democrats are not.“It has no practical impact,” said DeLaney, adding “all it does is create confusion for the voters.”Also on the ballot this year are all nine seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, three statewide offices, all 100 seats in the Indiana House and 25 in the Senate, local two statewide judicial positions, local races for judges and prosecuting attorneys, plus numerous local offices ranging from school board to township trustee. Some local jurisdictions have ballot issues as well.At the statewide level, Hoosiers have three options for secretary of state: incumbent Republican Connie Lawson, Democratic challenger Jim Harper and Libertarian challenger Mark Rutherford.In the race for Treasurer are Republican incumbent Kelly Mitchell and Democratic challenger John Aguilera. And for Auditor, voters have three options as well with Republican incumbent Tera Klutz, Democratic challenger Joselyn Whitticker and Libertarian challenger John Schick.Judge Robert Alice of the Indiana Court of Appeals and state Supreme Court Justice Geoffrey Slaughter face the voters in a yes or no judicial retention vote. Both were appointed by former Gov. Mike Pence. Hoosiers can find their polling location, whether they are registered and other information about what’s on the ballot here.Eddie Drews is a reporter for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Let the admissions begin

first_imgSeven hundred and seventy-two students have been admitted to the Harvard College Class of 2016 through the Early Action program, which was reinstated this year after a four-year absence.“Their academic, extracurricular, and personal promise are remarkable by any standard, and it will be exciting to follow their progress over the next four years and beyond,” said William R. Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions and financial aid.The Admissions Committee admitted fewer students than in the most recent years of Early Action, when between 813 and 902 were admitted from applicant pools that ranged from 3,869 to 4,214, slightly fewer than this year’s 4,231.“Given increases in our overall applicant numbers over the past few years to nearly 35,000 last year, the Admissions Committee took great care to admit only those we were certain would be admitted in Regular Action,” said Fitzsimmons.The admitted group is more diverse ethnically than any previous early cohort and is comparable with the current freshman class.  Although it is difficult to make precise comparisons to previous years because of changes in federal requirements concerning collecting and reporting race and ethnicity information, 9.6 percent of admitted students this year are African-American, compared with 7.2 percent the last time Harvard had Early Action. There was a similar increase for Latinos (9.9 percent vs. 7.9 percent) and Native Americans and Native Hawaiians (1.7 percent vs. 1 percent), and a slight decrease for Asian Americans (22 percent vs. 23 percent). The current freshman class is 19 percent Asian American, 10 percent African-American, 10.2 percent Latino, and 1.7 percent Native American and Native Hawaiian.It is still too early to determine the socioeconomic composition of the admitted group because many students have not yet submitted financial information.“Preliminary information such as requests for application-fee waivers indicates that there could well be more economic diversity than in previous early cohorts,” said Sarah C. Donahue, director of financial aid.  “We stand ready to help families that require financial assistance, including those that might be interested in a variety of financing options.”Admitted financial aid applicants will be informed of their awards as soon as they complete their forms.  All applicants to Harvard, Early or Regular (Jan. 1 application deadline for March 29 notification) have access to Harvard’s new Net-Price Calculator (NPC), a simple, one-page application available on the NPC website that provides an estimate of a family’s eligibility under Harvard’s generous need-based financial aid program.Families with annual incomes of $65,000 or less and normal assets are no longer required to contribute to their children’s educational expenses.  Those with incomes from $65,000 to $150,000 pay on a sliding scale up to 10 percent of annual income, and there is also need-based aid available to families with incomes greater than $150,000.  Home equity and retirement funds are not considered in the calculations, and students are no longer required to take out loans.  More than 60 percent of Harvard students receive need-based financial aid and receive grants averaging more than $40,000.Applicants were notified of the Admissions Committee’s decisions on Dec. 15.  In addition to the 772 admitted students, 2,838 were deferred and will be considered in the Regular Action process, 546 were denied, 25 withdrew, and 50 were incomplete.  Early Action at Harvard is nonbinding for admitted students, who are free to apply to other institutions and need only reply to Harvard by May 1, the National Common Notification Date.“Admitted students will hear a great deal from us over the months ahead,” said Marlyn McGrath, director of admissions.  Faculty, staff, undergraduate recruiters, and alumni/ae will use phone calls, emails, and regular mailings to reach admitted students with information about Harvard.  Many Harvard clubs will host local parties during the winter holidays and in April.  All admitted students will be invited to Cambridge on April 21-23 for the Visiting Program.“We want our admitted students to be fully informed about Harvard, as they make their decisions about which of the many fine colleges to which they have been admitted provides the best match for them at this important time in their lives,” she added.last_img read more

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Space heater may have caused fire that killed mom, 4 kids

first_imgDES PLAINES, Ill. (AP) — Fire officials say a space heater may have caused a blaze in suburban Chicago that killed four young girls and their mom. The Des Plaines Fire Department says the space heater was at the top of stairs tat were the only way in and out of the second-floor unit. That’s where all of the family members were found. The space heater’s placement may have blocked the family’s only path out of the burning building. No smoke detectors were on the second floor. Foul play is not suspected. The fire killed a 25-year-old woman and her four daughters, ages 1 to 6. The Des Plaines Fire Department is continuing its investigation.last_img read more

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H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: Public concern over vaccine, effective Chinese vaccine, Tamiflu resistance in Taiwan, vaccine option in Canada

first_imgOctober 22, 2009Poll shows growing flu concern, uncertainty about vaccineAmericans are more concerned about pandemic H1N1 flu than they were a couple of months ago, with about 52% saying they are greatly or somewhat worried, according to the latest Washington Post–ABC poll. The number is up 13 percentage points from August. However, only about a third say they’ll get the vaccine, though half said they’ll have their kids vaccinated. Those saying they’ll pass on the vaccine listed side-effect worries and perceived lack of testing as influencing their decision.http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/polls/postpoll_101909.htmlOct 15-18 Washington Post–ABC News PollSingle dose of Chinese H1N1 vaccine found effectiveIn a clinical trial, a single 15-microgram dose of a nonadjuvanted H1N1 vaccine recently licensed in China was found to induce a probably protective immune response in volunteers between the ages of 12 and 60, according to an report published yesterday by the New England Journal of Medicine. Lesser immune responses were seen with a single dose in younger and older people. The vaccine is made by Hualan Biological Bacterin Co.http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/NEJMoa0908535Oct 21 NEJM reportCanada’s pandemic vaccine campaign will have an unadjuvanted optionCanada has purchased 1.8 million doses of unadjuvanted pandemic H1N1 vaccine to use in the youngest children as well as pregnant women and others who might want an alternative to the adjuvanted version, the Canadian Press reported yesterday. Canada’s adjuvanted vaccine was approved on Oct 16. Officials predict that the unadjuvanted vaccine will be cleared in early November, but they don’t want people to wait for it even though experts say it may produce a more robust response in children under age 3.Doctors report rhabdomyolysis in pandemic flu patientAustralian physicians have documented a rare complication in a patient with pandemic H1N1 flu, myositis, and rhabdomyolysis. They reported their findings in an early online edition of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. According to a news report today about the study, the 16-year-old boy experienced intense muscle pain and nearly black urine 3 days after his flu symptoms began in June when the first wave of the pandemic hit Australia. He recovered after 8 days in the hospital.http://journals.lww.com/pidj/Abstract/publishahead/Melting_Muscles__Novel_H1N1_Influenza_A_Associated.99512.aspxOct 16 PIDJ abstractTamiflu treatment spawned resistance in Taiwan H1N1 caseTaiwan reported this week that the pandemic H1N1 virus became resistant to oseltamivir (Tamiflu) after a patient was treated with the drug. Oseltamivir-sensitive H1N1 was isolated from a 20-year-old man before treatment, the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control said. Three days later, after treatment began, an isolate from the man showed the resistance mutation. The man recovered, and there was no evidence that the virus spread to others. His case marked Taiwan’s first report of H1N1 resistance to the agent.http://www.cdc.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=26002&ctNode=960&mp=5Oct 20 Taiwan CDC reportFlu control measures seem to reduce other diseases in BoliviaHealth officials in Bolivia say a massive campaign to promote handwashing to prevent H1N1 flu seems to have reduced the spread of other common diseases, according to a Time magazine report. Dr. Rene Lenis, Bolivia’s director of epidemiology, reported a 10% to 15% drop in incidence of acute diarrheal diseases in all age-groups this year compared with last year. Public health agencies began promoting handwashing when the virus emerged in April.http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1931223,00.html?xid=rss-topstoriesOct 22 Time reportEgyptian capital cuts class sizes to curb flu spreadEgypt’s health and education ministries have ordered schools in Cairo to halve class sizes to slow the spread of the pandemic virus, IRIN News, a United Nations publication, reported today. Children will attend school on 3 alternate days instead of 6 double-shift days, a variation on a long-standing system to reduce crowding. The World Health Organization has said school closures can be disruptive and has recommended that schools take other preventive measures, such as easing crowding.http://www.irinnews.org/Report.aspx?ReportId=86695Oct 22 IRIN storylast_img read more

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Syracuse community reacts to upset win over No. 25 Notre Dame

first_img Published on January 28, 2016 at 8:59 pm Syracuse downed Notre Dame for its fourth conference win of the season, beating the Fighting Irish 81-66 on Thursday night in the Carrier Dome.[View the story “Syracuse community reacts to win over Notre Dame” on Storify] Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img

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