For the perfect scoop – take two

first_imgNewsFor the perfect scoop – take twoBy admin – March 22, 2012 610 WhatsApp Twitter Email Advertisement Linkedincenter_img Print In recent weeks, Limerick’s epicurean prowess was recognised again when Adare Farm scooped gold and silver at the National Ice cream awards. The Co. Limerick dairy-farm-turned-premium-ice-cream-business is honoured with a gold award for its tempting Honeycomb Ice Cream and a silver award for the brand’s limited edition Caramelised Pop Corn Ice Cream.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The popular Co. Limerick ice cream brand ‘scooped’ the top prize in the prestigious ‘Open Class’ at the inaugural Irish Ice Cream Alliance Awards.Located just outside the picturesque heritage town of Adare in County Limerick, Adare Farm has been steadily gaining word-of-mouth acclaim for its premium range of unique dairy products.Pasteurised but non-homogenised, Adare Farm dairy produce offers a traditionally creamy texture – pasteurisation guarantees the highest standards of food safety; non-homogenisation ensures a rich smoothness and a dreamy nostalgic taste.Dairy farmer and managing director of Adare Farm, Tommy Relihan, says it’s a significant endorsement of the SME’s quality, standards and ‘foodie’ credentials.“We believe that non-homogenised dairy produce always tastes better. So, while we pasteurise our milk to guarantee the very highest standards of food safety, we don’t homogenise”, explains Tommy.“Many of our customers tell us that there’s a huge difference between ice cream produced by some of the bigger brands and the delicious taste of our traditional Irish farmhouse product. The result of our traditional dairy processing techniques is a country-style dairy produce that many of us remember from our childhoods – it’s the kind of dairy produce that would have been the norm before Irish farming became more reliant on bulk processing technology.You will find many of the Adare Farm foods in over 20 retail outlets in the region and they have their shop operating in the Milk Market bringing you a taste of county Limerick’s finest. Be sure to get your hands on some of his award winning fare and here’s a hat tip to Tommy with my recipe for you to try.Spiced chocolate and lemon rind ice creamDON’T be worried or put off by the inclusion of the word spiced in the title as it’s more for effect than punch. But trust in me, I hope not to lead you astray. WHAT YOU NEED500 ml double cream21g unsweetened cocoa powder1/2 tsp cayenne pepper140g dark chocolate (60% or more)250ml milk150g sugarpinch of salt5 large egg yolks1/2 tsp vanilla extract100g of candied lemon peel WHAT TO DOWarm 250ml of the cream and add the coca powder and be sure to whisk it well to blend the powder in. Bring it to the boil and immediately reduce it to a simmer for one minute. Remove from the heat and stir in the chopped chocolate until the mix is smooth. Add in the other half of the cream. Pour the contents into a bowl and scrap down the sides. In the same pan, warm the milk, sugar and salt and in a separate bowl whisk the egg yolks. Slowly pour the milk over the eggs but be sure to whisk continually. Put the mix back on the heat and constantly keep the mixture moving and stir until it thickens enough to coat the back of the spoon. Place a sieve over the bowl with the cream and chocolate mixture and strain in the milk and egg custard. Stir in the vanilla extract, the cayenne and the lemon peel and cool the mixture over a cold water and ice bath. Chill it in the fridge and then place in the ice cream maker or the freezer. If you do place it in the freezer, during the first two to three hours of freezing be sure to stir the mix as this will remove the possibility of ice crystals forming. This mix will also work if you substitute the pepper and lemon for mint or liqueurs. Facebook Previous articleAn exquisite ‘Madama Butterfly’ arrivesNext articleSchool tutorial courses now enrolling for September 2012 adminlast_img read more

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Theater group brings ‘Cymbeline’ to the stage

first_imgFaked deaths. Real deaths. An evil stepmother. Conspiracies. Betrayal. Love. Ghosts. A god. You can catch all of these elements at the Not-So-Royal (NSR) Shakespeare Company’s production of “Cymbeline,” which is running from Thursday to Saturday.“I think it’s one of the most intense plots Shakespeare ever wrote … I like to think of it as Shakespeare’s fairytale,” junior Mary Elsa Henrichs, who is directing the play, said. “It’s got a lot of those elements. There’s a wicked stepmother, a princess who runs away in disguise and kidnapped princes. There’s also decapitation and a war between Britain and Rome … so there’s a lot of elements going on.” Henrichs described the play as “genre-breaking,” and said it takes elements from tragedies, comedies and romances. NSR is a unique Shakespeare troupe as it is entirely student run — from the production design to directing to marketing, the students are at the reigns of the project. “I think it’s really special and amazing that we have this club on campus, because I think it’s one thing to encounter a text of Shakespeare in a class, and that can be really wonderful and beneficial, but I really believe they were written to be performed and written to be seen,” Henrichs said. “To be able to bring plays, one a semester, to the Notre Dame campus community so that we can experience Shakespeare in the fashion that he wrote for, rather than just reading it on a page or even SparkNoting it, is really great.”Henrichs is a veteran of acting in Shakespeare plays and said “Cymbeline” is one of the reasons she fell in love with Shakespeare’s works. “I’ve been in 15 of Shakespeare’s plays, and this was the one where I think I fell in love with acting,” she said. “ … It’s just such a wild plot for actors to be spinning together. So I think it offers a lot to its actors and its creators. It’s a show that everyone has to work together to bring together.”Henrichs said there is also value in producing a lesser-known play.“I think there’s a lot of pressure to be haughty for some prestigious play, but we are the Not-So-Royal Shakespeare Company, so we’re able to take on these pieces and bring a cool life to them,” she said.Junior Ellis Sargeant is acting in a production of “Cymbeline” for a second time after first acting in it in high school. This time he is taking on the role of Posthumus Leonatus, a character whom Sargeant said he can relate to, although the character does go through some things that most people will not, such as ordering the murder of his wife. “One of the reasons I was really drawn to the role is that, although murder is a bit much and it’s about royal figures in life and death, the actual things that he’s going through is stuff that I can actually relate to, like heartbreak and betrayal,” Sargeant said. Sargeant said “Cymbeline” is an interesting play to perform, because Shakespeare incorporates many of the typical fairytale archetypes that we know of today, even before most of those typical fairytales were written. “You have these fairytale elements,” he said. “ … There’s the evil potion given by an evil stepmother. It’s following all of these tropes and predates all the Disney movies that we’re familiar with. Despite being a very little known play, it actually shows up a lot in our cultural consciousness. We understand the archetypes of the characters that are in it. We know what it’s like to have the virtuous heroine. We know what it’s like to have the fallen hero. We know what it’s like to have the trickster, the evil stepmother or the blind king.”This particular production of “Cymbeline” uses key props to both set the stage of the play and as plot devices. A couple of these, according to Henrichs and Sargeant, are a trunk and a vial of something that may or may not be poison. “We consistently throughout the play are pulling things out of the trunk and building the world around us. We even build the theater around the audience in order to start the show and expose just a little bit of the artifice in order to bring people into the story,” Sargeant said.Sophomore Isobel Grogan, who is playing Cymbeline’s daughter Innogen, said “Cymbeline” has many of  the qualities that Shakespeare is known for including in his works.“If you had to pick one play of Shakespeare’s that perfectly encapsulates all of his tropes and his weirdness and his issues and his strengths, I think ‘Cymbeline’ is the best one. It’s got a lot of moving parts,” Grogan said. Grogan said each character has a specific prop throughout the play, which works towards their goal in stripping the play of many of it’s more complicated frills in order to simplify it for the audience. “We’re playing with the idea of everybody having one emblematic prop that defines their character. [We are] taking away as many frills as possible to get down to the base of the story and let that speak for itself,” Grogan said. Sargeant said the beauty of performing this fairytale-esque play instead of something more realistic or relatable is grounded in our ever-present storytelling as a society and as people. “We constantly tell stories about ourselves,” he said. “There is not an aspect of our lives that we don’t tell in the form of a story. No one can actually condense themselves down to something that’s able to be given to another person without a story, without a narrative. You always pick and choose which details you’re telling … and bring[ing] the audience into them rather than hiding them I think is a good way to have people look at it in a way that’s different from how it’s normally done.”Tags: cymbeline, Not-So-Royal Shakespeare Company, NSRlast_img read more

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Wasting too much ink on straw news

first_imgExcuse me, but could someone please calculate the millions of pounds of paper and ink used thus far for printing the so-called “news” about plastic straws, and hasten the time when something more important will replace the space used for reporting on that topic? The solution is simple:Let people who are concerned stop using them and keep big government out of it.Richard FelakNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesNiskayuna girls’ cross country wins over BethlehemEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsPuccioni’s two goals help Niskayuna boys’ soccer top Shaker, remain perfectEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the census Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

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