Oxford Students Protest India’s Citizenship Amendment Act

first_imgProtests against the bill erupted in cities and at universities across India. During a protest at Jamia Millia Islamia University in Delhi, police were accused of firing tear gas at the library, locking the gates of the university’s campus, and using batons on students. Excessive police force is also believed to have been used at a number of other universities. Those attending the event joined protesters across the world, expressing solidarity with students who had been subject to police brutality as they carried out demonstrations in universities across India. Yesterday students gathered outside the Radcliffe Camera to protest the Citizenship Amendment Act, a bill passed in India’s Parliament which has been widely criticised as Islamophobic. By Tuesday at 8:00 am the statement had received more than300 signatures by members and alumni of Oxford University. “OIS celebrates India’s unity in diversity; we are saddened thatthis spirit of unity is under threat, and we hope that the right to peacefulprotest is upheld.” #JamiaProtests #JamiaMilliaUniversity @adilhossain pic.twitter.com/D9ynVJ2wzK— Tania Saeed (@taniasaeed) December 17, 2019 A statement released by the Oxford India Society said: “OxfordIndia Society stands in solidarity with our fellow students at universitycampuses across India who are protesting against the unjust CitizenshipAmendment Act, and we condemn police brutality against these protestors.center_img The protest outside the Radcliffe Camera, which endured the rain this afternoon, was attended by approximately one hundred despite term ending for undergraduates last week. Placards at the event read “selective democracy is not democracy”, “trust anyone but Delhi Police” and “unconditional solidarity with Jamia, Amu, DU [Delhi University] and others”. Another statement open for signature by Oxford students alsocalled for an end to violence against those protesting, as well as criticisingthe CAA: “We, the students, scholars and alumni of the University of Oxford,are in solidarity with students exercising their fundamental right to dissentand protest across India.“We condemn the violence unleashed on students in Jamia Millia Islamia (NewDelhi), Aligarh Muslim University (Aligarh), Delhi University (New Delhi),Cotton University (Assam) and other educational institutions. The use of policeforce against students exercising their fundamental right to protest inuniversity spaces and elsewhere is a direct attack on the foundations of ademocratic society. We demand an immediate end to all forms of violence againstthe protesting students and call for accountability of those responsible.“Over the last week, we have seen many peaceful protests and demonstrationsacross India against the Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019. The Act stipulatespreferential treatment to religious minorities from Pakistan, Bangladesh andAfghanistan in the process of acquiring Indian citizenship, while explicitlyexcluding Muslims from its purview. This explicit and blatant exclusion ofMuslims from citizenship upends the long-standing fundamental ideals of equality,liberty, pluralism and secularism enshrined in the Constitution of India. Welend our voices in support of the fight against this immoral andunconstitutional law and call for its immediate withdrawal.“As we watch, with extreme concern, the events unfolding in India, we lend ourunconditional support for the students and others peacefully taking to thestreets to fight injustice.” “We demand cessation of violence by the policeand their complete withdrawal from the university premises.“We demand an immediate, independent, and robustinvestigation into the abuse of power by the Delhi Police, Uttar PradeshPolice, and the Central Reserve Police Force.“We demand that student protestors be allowed tocontinue to protest peacefully in exercise of their fundamental rights underthe Indian Constitution without any threat of use of force by the police orother law enforcement agencies.“We call upon officers of the Indian Police andAdministrative Services to fulfill their duty to uphold the Constitution ofIndia, and to resist any political demand to act in abuse of the powers thathave been conferred upon them; and, to ensure police forces under their commandact strictly in accordance with the constitutional, legal and ethicalconstraints that bind them.“We call on the Minister of Home Affairs, Mr.Amit Shah, to immediately take these necessary steps to curb police brutality,or resign.” As well as at Oxford, today students gathered in protest ata number of campuses across the UK and the world including Harvard, Yale andMIT. A statement was released on behalf of students and alumni protesting atAmerican universities. The statement criticised the use of force by policeresponding to the peaceful protests, and made a number of demands of the Indiangovernment: The Citizenship (Amendment) Act passed through India’s Parliament on 11th December this year. The bill is designed to enable the provision of citizenship as a right to religious minorities from Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan who have suffered from, or who stand the risk of suffering from religious persecution. However, the bill specifically nominates six religions as being eligible for citizenship: Hindus, Sikhs, Buddhists, Jains, Parsis, and Christians. The bill has been criticised for its omission of Muslim refugees, which violates India’s constitutional commitment to secularism.last_img read more

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Santos confirms significant offshore gas find at Corvus area, W. Australia

first_imgSpotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Offshore Energy Today, established in 2010, is read by over 10,000 industry professionals daily. We had nearly 9 million page views in 2018, with 2.4 million new users. This makes us one of the world’s most attractive online platforms in the space of offshore oil and gas and allows our partners to get maximum exposure for their online campaigns. If you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today contact our marketing manager Mirza Duran for advertising options. Australian oil and gas company Santos has said it has successfully drilled the Corvus-2 appraisal well confirming “a significant gas resource” in the Carnarvon Basin, offshore Western Australia.Noble Tom Prosser rig / Image source: Noble CorporationThe well, located in petroleum permit WA-45-R, in which Santos has a 100 percent interest, is approximately 90 kilometers northwest of Dampier.The Corvus-2 well intersected a gross interval of 638 meters, one of the largest columns ever discovered across the North West Shelf, Santos said. The well reached a total depth of 3,998 meters.Wireline logging to date has confirmed 245 meters of net hydrocarbon pay across the target reservoirs in the North Rankin and Mungaroo formations, between 3,360 and 3,998 meters.Higher permeability zones than encountered in Corvus-1 have been observed from initial pressure sampling completed in the well. Compared to Corvus-1, initial samples acquired from Corvus-2 indicate a significantly higher Condensate Gas Ratio of up to 10 bbl/mmscf and a similar CO2 content of 7 percent, Santos added.Corvus-2 is approximately three kilometers southwest of Corvus-1, which was drilled in 2000. The water depth at the location is 63 meters. The field is approximately 28 kilometers from the Reindeer platform, which delivers gas to the Devil Creek domestic gas plant near Karratha, and about 62 kilometers to a Varanus Island tie-in point. Santos has a 100 percent interest in all these facilities.The well was drilled using the jack-up drilling rig, Noble Tom Prosser, and will be plugged and abandoned as planned once logging operations are completed.Santos Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer Kevin Gallagher said: “Corvus-2 has delivered a fantastic result and has opened up a number of additional exploration opportunities in the region. It is particularly exciting to have realized higher liquids content and significantly bigger resource volume than we expected.”“Corvus could be tied back to either our Devil Creek or Varanus Island gas plants, where it has the potential to increase the utilization of our existing facilities as well as provide backfill and extend plateau well into the 2030s.”“It’s a great start to our 2019 offshore drilling campaign, and it also highlights the value of the Quadrant acquisition and our strategy of pursuing upstream brownfield growth opportunities around existing infrastructure. The rig will now move north to commence the Dorado appraisal program,” Gallagher said.WoodMac: Corvus is Carnarvon basin’s largest gas discovery in a decade Commenting on Santos’ announcement on Tuesday, Wood Mackenzie senior analyst Daniel Toleman said: “Based on limited information, our initial estimate is a 2.5 tcf gas and 25 mmbbl condensate resource. This will be the largest gas discovery in the Carnarvon basin since the Satyr-4 exploration well drilled by Chevron in 2009.“Santos’ stated 254m net pay is indicative of a very large gas resource in place, but recoverable volumes will be dependant on the size of the structure, area extent and sand thickness.“Santos suggested that Corvus will supply the domestic market. The field is near to Santos’ Reindeer development and if the resource comes in over 2 tcf, we believe Santos will explore opportunities to export the gas as LNG. This is due to Corvus’ proximity to the Burrup Peninsula, and a well-supplied domestic market in the short-to-medium term.“The North West Shelf has LNG production capacity available from 2021. The Corvus discovery could fill this ullage. If an LNG backfill development is to progress, we expect Santos will look to sell down, as it currently holds 100% in the find. One of the North West Shelf partners would be a logical entrant.“Quadrant’s exploration portfolio is shaping up to be a good buy for Santos. Dorado was the third largest oil discovery in Western Australia’s history and Corvus is likely to be Santos’ largest offshore gas discovery ever.”Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

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