GAA NEWS: DONEGAL MINOR HURLING BOARD NOTES

first_imgDONEGAL MINOR HURLING BOARD NOTESMinorSt Eunans were too strong for Setanta and had a comfortable win in O’Donnell Park.Burt and Aodh Ruadh had a close game inBallyshannon and it was the Burt men’s ability to get goals that proved the difference as they won 3.3 to 0.7….Goals also proved the difference in Carndonagh as Carndonagh and Letterkenny Gaels had a tough battle and the Carn men won 4.8 to 0.8. U 14 Div 1In Hibernian Park Burt and St Eunans had a thrilling game where both teams enjoyed spells of dominance in the end the Burt lads came out on top 5.3 to 2.8.Div 2Aodh Ruadh made the long trip to Gaothdobhair to take on Dungloe/Gaothdobhair, this was another thrilling game that went from end to end with both teams being on top at different stages. When the final whistle went it was Aodh Ruadh who were on top 7.9 to 6.6. GAA NEWS: DONEGAL MINOR HURLING BOARD NOTES was last modified: May 6th, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalMInor Hurling Board noteslast_img read more

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The Ashes: Australia pace battery better than 2013-14 trio, says Ryan Harris

first_imgFormer Australia quick Ryan Harris, who was one of the architects of England’s 0-5 whitewash in the 2013-14 Ashes, feels the current fast bowling trio of Mitchell Starc, Josh Hazlewood and Pat Cummins is more potent.Harris, who claimed 22 wickets and formed a formidable combination with left-armer Mitchell Johnson and Peter Siddle during the 2013-14 edition, believes it will be the pace attacks of both sides that will decide the course of the series, starting in Brisbane from November 23.”Hazlewood’s probably doing the job that I did (four years ago) and he’s quicker than me, and he gets more bounce,” Harris said at the Adelaide Oval ahead of the four-day day-night tour game against England that starts on Wednesday. (Also read:  England paceman Steven Finn ruled out with knee injury)”And you’ve got Starc who can definitely do a Johnson role, and you’ve got Cummins so you’ve probably got an extra bit of pace. Cummins on his day he’s fast as well.”Obviously we did a good job last time, but the key is going to be working as a team, as a bowling unit. That’s what we did well last time and obviously got the results,” the 38-year-old added.Reuters PhotoReuters Photo While the first Test will be played at the Gabba in Brisbane, the second match will be a day-night affair at Adelaide from December 2-6.The third Test will be played at the WACA Ground in Perth from December 14-18 while the fourth match will be played on Boxing Day in Melbourne followed by the final Test in Sydney from January 4-8.advertisementlast_img read more

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LaVar Ball Crazy or a Genius LaMelo and LiAngelo

I need LaVar Ball to succeed, man. I need them to become mega millionaires. Like I need this to happen.— Mel Blunt (@KNGSHxT) December 7, 2017 InstagramIt looks like the relationship between the Ball family and the UCLA Basketball program is done forever.As ESPN reports, LaMelo and LiAngelo Ball — ages 16 and 19 respectively — just signed with the sports agent Harrison Gaines and will skip college to play overseas. LiAngelo played for the storied UCLA Bruins until he was suspended for shoplifting in China last month. Afterwards, his dad LaVar Ball pulled him out of school completely.  The eldest brother Lonzo Ball played for the university as well, but just one year before he headed to the NBA to play for the Los Angeles Lakers. The main reason for sending LaMelo and LiAngelo overseas is so they can be teammates, their dad explained.“I don’t care about the money,” said LaVar. “I want them to go somewhere where they will play them together on the court at the same time. The priority is for the boys to play on the same team.”In October, the 50-year-old father withdrew LaMelo from Chino Hills High School, and the original plan was to enroll him in UCLA in two years time. “He’s not going to play college basketball,” said LaVar.It seems getting his boys to play competitively again is another reason LaVar wants to send them overseas since LiAngelo was suspended from UCLA. Moreover, there’s a good chance that his stock would’ve fallen come NBA Draft time. So far, there have been a few overseas teams that have expressed interest in the two younger Ball brothers but nothing has been confirmed yet. “I don’t know the deals and who is offering what,” LaVar stated. “I’m letting Harrison handle all that, but I know there are a few teams interested. I just need to get them playing again.”Plus, no matter what country LaMelo and LiAngelo will play in, their dad said he’ll be there with them periodically, as well as other family members.“There will be three people with them all the time,” stated LaVar. “I’ll go back and forth and probably stay out there a while at first.”Of course, it didn’t take long for people to chime in with their opinions about the Ball brother playing overseas and not going to school. “How does it feel to know you’ve completely ruined your two youngest son’s chances of making it pro?” one person wrote on LaVar’s Instagram page.“What was the whole point of Gelo and Melo getting scholarships to UCLA if you’re just pulling them right out?” another person asked. “You know how many people would die for a scholarship?”Related news: LaVar BallTrump Says LaVar Ball Is a ‘Poor Man’s Don King’LaVar Ball Isn’t Backing Down from Michael Jordan, Says He Could ‘Beat Him with One Hand’LaVar Ball Pulling AAU Team Off Floor Over ‘Bad’ Call Earns Immdiate Scorn from Disgusted Twitter UsersOthers, however, came to the father’s defense and compared him to Hollywood parents like Kris Kardashian. Some folks also told people to mind their business.“What he does with his kids doesn’t concern you.” He’s helping Gelo,” wrote Instagram user Scott James Jr. “What he’s doing to Melo is questionable. How is that deflecting when you criticize this man for creating a different path for his kids like Hollywood parents do all the time.”Between creating his own shoe and fashion brand, and sending his kids overseas instead of college, it’s clear that LaVar is taking unprecedented steps to get his boys to the NBA. So far, at least in Lonzo’s case, his plan has worked, despite some of the backlash.But is what that Instagram user said correct? Did papa Ball just ruin his boy’s chances of getting to the NBA?To get an answer we reached out to former ESPN employee, Sports Anchor and reporter Derwin Worrell, who said things may be challenging for the Balls, but they still have a good chance of making it in the U.S.“They can still get to the NBA without going to college,” Worrell told Atlantic Black Star. “They will have less exposure by playing overseas. But some NBA teams have great scouts overseas, so if they can really play, they will get noticed and because of the Ball name, NBA teams will definitely be watching.”Basketball fans and other folks familiar with the Balls will surely be watching too, just to see if LaVar’s master plan of sending his kids overseas will work out.Wonder if Lavar Ball ever stopped and asked his kids “what do you want to do?”— Rod Bridgers (@rod_bridgers) December 7, 2017 If people think Lavar Ball is sending his kids overseas just because of basketball y’all crazy, this is a smart man, he just want to promote the BBB brand, that man not stupid y’all better put some respect on his name, IT’S ALL ABOUT THE BAG 💼💯💯💯@bigballerbrand— Coach Twin (@twintowers504) December 7, 2017 LaVar Ball reminds me of the little league Dad who coaches his kid and thinks the kid is way better than he really is. #TheBalls— Tony Patelis (@CollegeHoopNews) December 7, 2017 Lavar Ball is absolutely tanking the futures of his sons and I’m already getting excited for how depressing the 30 for 30 is go to be— Matt Kulka (@kulkanator) December 7, 2017 Thank you Lavar Ball for pulling your sons out of the US basketball systems now they can be Europe’s problem— chris.barry (@beardog40) December 7, 2017 The NCAA is garbage, Lavar Ball is right, and in 20 years he’ll be seen as a prophet. Don’t you @ me either.— Kazeem Famuyide (@RealLifeKaz) December 6, 2017 Lavar ball one of the goats— Davir Hamilton (@EspnHam9) December 7, 2017 Lavar Ball is the Kris Jenner of basketball.— rae-rae ♍️ (@ThatsSoRavii) December 7, 2017 Lavar Ball out here turning the tables 😂😂😂😂😂😂— 8Eye™ (@JaimeBoyer) December 7, 2017 read more

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One Last Dispatch From The Land Of Chess Kings And Billionaires

Left: Neil deGrasse Tyson, a celebrated astrophysicist, and Fabiano Caruana, the No. 2 ranked chess player in the world, chatted about baseball. Right: Peter Thiel showed up for the decisive tiebreaker round and had a grandmaster at his side to explain the games live. After the match — after the trophy presentation and the cake and the champagne — our photographer and I tracked down the Norwegian contingent at an after-after-party at a steakhouse a couple miles uptown. It was a festive scene. Holiday garland and lights festooned the bannisters and the restaurant was a cozy respite from the cold and rainy November day outside. Carlsen was sitting at a far table in the crowded dining room with about 50 others. He was eating. With a fork. Like a person. It was odd to see him with something other than a chess piece in his hand.I wanted to talk to him. I’d been watching him for hours most days for the past three weeks. But honestly I had no idea what I’d say. Carlsen famously hates interviews. But I was saved. “No questions. Definitely no,” his manager, Espen Agdestein, told us. “He’s very tired. We’re just relaxing.”I’m not Carlsen. But I understood. Left: While waiting for the title ceremony, Magnus Carlsen is finally able to relax with his father by his side. Right: Following his defeat, Karjakin was clearly disappointed while speaking to the Russian media. He confirmed rumors about travelling to New York with a Virgin Mary icon. Left: Magnus Carlsen, 26, at the World Chess Championship’s opening gala at the Plaza Hotel in New York City. Right: Sergey Karjakin, 26, tests the overhead lights in the playing hall. All photographs by Misha Friedman There are other internal chess-world squabbles. Agon Limited, the match’s organizer, filed an application for a restraining order and injunction against a number of popular third-party chess websites, just before the match began. The websites’ alleged transgression? Relaying chess moves live, which Agon saw as a violation. The application was denied by a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, who wrote that “robust reporting of factual data concerning the contestants’ moves” best served the public interest. Agon’s CEO, Ilya Merenzon, told me that the company would continue to pursue the matter in court, and was also proposing legislation to cement their rights to the games they organize.I discussed the case with Macauley Peterson, the content director for chess24, one of the defendants, on the floor of the venue during one of the early games. He kept glancing away from me at people walking by. He said he was worried about who might be eavesdropping.The tournament’s organizers have declared their own victory, though, bragging that the 20-day biennial championship had drawn some 10,000 spectators to its location in the South Street Seaport. But that’s less than, say, half the average attendance of the worst team in baseball for any one of its 81 home games this year. And the event’s only two main sponsors were PhosAgro, a Russian producer of phosphate-based fertilizer, and EG Capital Advisors, a Russian investment management company. Not exactly Nike and Coca-Cola. Left: A branded vodka bar assured VIPs were sufficiently entertained throughout the tournament. Right: Ekaterina, a Karjakin family friend, flew in from Moscow just for the tiebreaker round. Spectators in the VIP lounge. A production team from Russia created an atmosphere for VIPs more often seen in Moscow than Manhattan. Tickets were expensive, but there were a lot of young fans at every game, especially on weekends. You had to elbow your way through knots of onlookers to get anywhere in the venue’s sprawling VIP wing. Men in suits and expensive shoes crowded around TVs, watching the games and sipping martinis. The room was at a low murmur — equal parts English and Russian with an occasional dash of Norwegian. The clinking of glasses and the ratatat of ice in cocktail shakers punctuated the chess talk.Like a Russian nesting doll, a VVIP section had been set up for Peter Thiel, the Silicon Valley billionaire, and company within the VIP section. It was newly roped off and closely monitored by scary-looking bodyguards. Thiel, a Donald Trump supporter and a strong chess player himself, and Yuri Milner, the Russian billionaire venture capitalist, sat at a board inside. With apologies to Beyoncé, it was $6 billion at a chess table. Accompanying them: Bennett Miller, who directed “Foxcatcher,” about the wrestling-obsessed murderer and multimillionaire heir to the du Pont fortune, and the Icelandic grandmaster Hedinn Steingrimsson, who was giving them a private analysis of the ongoing championship game taking place just a few yards away.A buffet and wine bar had been installed for the guests from Silicon Valley who’d arrived that day, and bored-looking members of their entourages lolled on large couches, poking at iPhones. Word around the venue was that the billionaires had paid $50,000 for these privileges. (The match’s organizer wouldn’t comment on the figure.) Much later in the evening, some other journalists and I raided their buffet, eating what must have been thousands of dollars worth of cold mini tacos.“Are you security?” the writer Brin-Jonathan Butler asked one of the well-dressed, well-built men keeping close watch over the well-heeled chess lesson.“Something like that,” he responded ominously. “I wouldn’t bother them, if you don’t mind.”This World Chess Championship scene was somewhere at the intersection of Bond film, Trump fundraiser and museum gala. Watching an elite chess match in person is at once enjoyable and discomfiting. You follow the players’ actions — their moves, their mannerisms — for long stretches of time. You hang on each one and imbue it with meaning. You become so familiar with their moves that you can rattle them off later from memory: “queen to h6,” say, or “rook to e2.” You try to understand why the players did what they did. The moves can be beautiful or inscrutable or frustrating or disappointing. You try to imagine what you would do if you were in one of their chairs. You try to predict what they will do next. You try and make sense of their postgame explanations. But you aren’t them, and you can never really understand.On Wednesday, the final day of the World Chess Championship, hundreds crowded into the Fulton Market Building in lower Manhattan to watch, trying to understand. Magnus Carlsen, the defending champion, No. 1-rated player in the world and the closest thing the sport has to a rock star, was facing his challenger, Sergey Karjakin of Russia, in a series of speedy tiebreaker games. The 12 lengthy games that had stretched over the previous 19 days — I attended 11 in person — ended tied and the two grandmasters were back in their chairs in a soundproof glass box to break the deadlock. It was the biggest day in chess in many years. Carlsen, the former wunderkind, was clinging to his title and his legacy, while Karjakin and the Russians were hoping for a return to the days of Soviet chess hegemony. On the fourth game of the tiebreaker, and the 16th of the match, Carlsen attacked the Russian’s king, Karjakin resigned and the two shook hands. It was over. Despite the high-powered, moneyed interest, and its prime New York City location, the match was sparsely covered by the American press — as chess is generally — and given little attention outside the core chess world. It’s unlikely to increase the game’s reach or exposure as the organizers may have hoped. That did happen once in the States — in 1972 — but that was because of Bobby Fischer.The troublesome shadow of Fischer stretches over every conversation of chess’s success and future in the U.S. He was the best American player of all time, and its only modern world champion. His legacy is stained by his vocal anti-Semitism, and comments that he was pleased with the terrorism on Sept. 11, among other things. But in his chess prime, he carried the U.S. on his back while sitting at the board, having taught himself the game, largely alone, in a shabby Brooklyn apartment. And he won.While this year’s championship lacked the colorful characters and Cold War narrative of Fischer’s title run — although some journalists tried to revive them — it did have some of the controversy.Kirsan Ilyumzhinov, the president of the game’s international governing body, FIDE, was absent from the match, having been sanctioned by the U.S. for business connections with the Assad regime in Syria. Ilyumzhinov is no stranger to controversy. He insists he was abducted by aliens. They were wearing yellow spacesuits and nabbed him from his Moscow apartment in 1997, taking him away to a distant star. He considers chess “a gift from extraterrestrial civilizations.” But despite the controversy and the finances, what’s really missing from chess is a character.The U.S. has three players in the world Top 10, any one of whom could have a shot at challenging Carlsen for the title in two years. They’re undeniably fantastic players. But they seem less like compelling national characters — and less like artists — than Fischer did. They’re technicians, raised in a computer-chess age. Carlsen ended the match and extended his world championship reign with a beautiful move on Wednesday evening — whether he’d admit its beauty or not — sacrificing his queen to entrap Karjakin’s king. But in one of the postgame press conferences, Carlsen said chess was a sport and a science. For art, he said, you’d “have to look elsewhere.” read more

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