‘Desperate but not hopeless times’

first_imgThe election of Donald Trump as U.S. president could add to the turbulence Europe is already experiencing from its persistent debt crisis, the rise of nationalist political parties, and Britain’s decision to leave the European Union, analysts told a Harvard conference.At the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies’ annual Summit on the Future of Europe on Monday, speakers agreed there are no easy solutions to the upheavals that have buffeted the continent’s economy and raised concerns about the survival of its democratic traditions. The outcome of the U.S. elections adds to the uncertainty.“These are desperate but not hopeless times,” said Charles Maier, the Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History at Harvard, alluding to Trump’s election and the overall rise of populism both in Europe and in the United States.“Unfortunately, we are still in the midst of the most serious crisis in the history of European integration,” said Jeffry Frieden, professor of government, noting that the “European Union and the Eurozone in particular is still in the grips of a devastating debt crisis with extraordinarily sweeping economic and political implications.”But while differing on the best approach, speakers said there are strategies that European leaders can follow to ease the crisis atmosphere.The daylong event featured sessions on European democracy, the Eurozone crisis, security and foreign policy challenges, and the future of the European Union, along with a keynote address by European Commissioner Pierre Moscovici.Pippa Norris, the Paul F. McGuire Lecturer in Comparative Politics at the Kennedy School of Government, said rising populism is leading to a shift from the traditional left-right political division to a “new cleavage” separating people with cosmopolitan, liberal attitudes from those who are anti-establishment.Norris argued that the populist surge in Europe and the United States is driven primarily by a cultural backlash, observing that as progressive values have grown since the 1960s, “Many groups have been left off, and in particular the older generation rejects these values and feels that their values are now under threat.”She added, “It’s a threat to democracy and democratic promotion around the world.”Peter A. Hall, Krupp Professor of European Studies and resident faculty at CES, and Dante Roscini, professor of management practice at HBS and faculty associate, joined in the discussion. Photo by David Elmes/Minda de Gunzburg Center for European StudiesJoseph H.H. Weiler, former president of the European University Institute, said there has been an ongoing democratic crisis, stemming from the fact that the growth of the EU’s powers and functions have far outpaced that of its democratic institutions. European citizens do not have the feeling, essential to a democracy, that they can influence government, he said.“The big debate about austerity and growth doesn’t get processed through elections to the European Parliament,” he said.Daniel Ziblatt, professor of government at Harvard, said there are warning signs that Europe is heading for a crisis in democracy. He cited the rise of far-right political parties, a trend he believes traditional center-right parties are best suited to manage.“A well-organized constitutional right is able to contain the far right within its ranks,” he said.Wolfgang Merkel, director of the Democracy and Democratization Research Unit at the Berlin Social Science Center and currently a fellow at the de Gunzburg center, cautioned against sweeping judgments on whether democracy is in crisis.He said studies show, for instance, a significant decline in public trust in elective government, but high trust for institutions such as the military, police, and the judiciary.Frieden said EU leaders have failed to take the steps needed to resolve the debt crisis.“The longer the member states of the Eurozone … delay a restructuring of these debts, the greater costs to overall growth in the area, the greater the political cost to every member state government, and the greater the political cost to the European Union,” he said.Peter A. Hall, Harvard’s Krupp Foundation Professor of European Studies, warned that in addition to its debt, banking, and growth crises, Europe faces a political one, with declining levels of trust in government and a shift away from mainstream politics. Hall argued that EU leaders worsened or caused the problem by seeking a “fuller fiscal or political union” in response to the Eurozone crisis, an approach that he said deprives national electorates of the sense that their governments are accountable.“The EU should be loosening rather than tightening its requirements on national governments,” he said.But Hans-Helmut Kotz, visiting professor of economics at Harvard, said one of the EU’s problems is that it has failed to coordinate its fiscal and monetary policies. “The upshot is that monetary policy and fiscal policy intersecting in Europe do not suffice to create a macro environment that could nurture and support growth,” he said.Christopher Smart, a senior fellow at the Kennedy School’s Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, said that while populism and nationalism are no doubt on the rise, broader economic and technological trends are driving the world closer together.He added that institutions, notably the European Central Bank, remain firmly in place to grapple with those forces.SaveSaveSaveSaveSavelast_img read more

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Parents bring in lawyers for school stoushes

first_imgNZ Herald 29 June 2014A leading psychologist says parents are increasingly bringing lawyers in to work out issues at schools.Nigel Latta, a clinical psychologist and parenting expert, told TVNZ’s Q and A that parents are bringing lawyers in to deal with problems at their child’s school, and it’s wrong.Sixteen-year-old Lucan Battison successfully challenged a suspension from Hastings’ St John’s College after refusing to cut his “naturally curly hair”.The school’s rules set out are that students must have “hair that is short, tidy and of natural colour. Hair must be off the collar and out of the eyes”.Justice David Collins said on Friday that the rule was capable of being interpreted differently by students, parents, teachers, the principal and the school’s board and was not legally enforceable.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11284209Student shown the door for ‘offensive’ hair style3 News 2 July 2014Demetric Blank is a student from Tararua College, in Pahiatua, and has never been suspended or expelled for bad behaviour.But he isn’t allowed to be at school at the moment – why?His new hair style has offended teaching staff and he has been told to grow it out before returning.They also wouldn’t give him the option to shave it all off, because it would be too short for their school policy.So is that fair? His hair style would be seen on most rugby fields and isn’t exactly wild.http://www.3news.co.nz/Student-shown-the-door-for-offensive-hair-style/tabid/817/articleID/347451/Default.aspxlast_img read more

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Duda OKs millions of dollars for public media

first_imgDUDA. NEWS.YAHOO.COM His decision was closely watched givenhow politically charged the issue of public media has become in Poland. Thepolitical opposition had called for the money to instead be used for cancertreatment. President Andrzej Duda, who hails fromthe ruling Law and Justice party, signed the funding bill late Friday as hecampaigns for a second five-year term in a May election. WARSAW – Poland’s president has signed abill earmarking nearly 2 billion zlotys ($510 million) to fund publictelevision and radio, broadcast outlets that have become mouthpieces for thecountry’s right-wing government and given the president positive coverage as hecampaigns for reelection. Duda said he had doubts about signingthe legislation approved by parliament into law. In doing so, he allowed alarge injection of money to go into broadcasters that were already helping hiscampaign.(AP)last_img read more

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Robert William Tekulve

first_imgRobert William Tekulve, age 68, of Steamboat Springs, Colorado, formerly of Batesville, IN, died April 30, 2020 at his home. Born November 28, 1951, in Batesville, IN, he was the son of Robert A. and Edna M. Tekulve. He is survived by his sister Beverly (Ken) Wehr, and brothers Steve (Carol) Spencer, John (Kathy) Tekulve, William (Helen) Tekulve, and sister-in-law Susan Tekulve; also 13 nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents and his brother James Tekulve. He grew up in Batesville and was a 1969 graduate of BHS.  he was a professional drywaller, and an avid sports and Denver Broncos fan. He lived his dream hunting in the mountains of Colorado, Idaho, and the Canadian and Alaskan Yukon. He was recognized in Boone & Crockett’s and Sierra Club for his world-class trophy elk, antelope, caribou, and Dall sheep, and for outstanding wildlife conservation. He was of the Catholic faith. A celebration of life will be held at a later date.last_img read more

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