John Kadlecik Announces Four-Night Summer Solstice Jam

first_imgJohn Kadlecik will host the Summer Solstice Jam at Gyspsy Sally’s in Washington, DC from June 21st – 24th. The guitarist, who used to play lead guitar with Bob Weir and Phil Lesh’s Grateful Dead spin-off band Furthur, will join forces with keyboardist Melvin Seals, drummer Jay Lane, bassist Robin Sylvester, and backing vocalists Jessica Lake and Mary Lankford for four shows.In addition to co-founding Furthur with Weir and Lesh, Kadlecik also co-founded popular Grateful Dead tribute act Dark Star Orchestra, though he is no longer a member of the band. These days, he plays with the John Kadlecik Band, the Golden Gate Wingmen, and a variety of other projects.Kadlecik won’t be the only person on stage with connections to the Grateful Dead. Seals, who co-founded The Mix with Kadlecik in 2004, performed with the Jerry Garcia Band for over 15 years and continues to play the group’s music with his Melvin Seals and JGB project. Lane—who is also a member of Golden Gate Wingmen—and Sylvester are both current members of Weir’s post-Dead project RatDog (and Lane was even one of the early drummers for Primus).Tickets for the Summer Solstice Jam are now on sale. Fans can expect to hear plenty of jams and tunes from the Grateful Dead and Jerry Garcia catalogs. Each night will feature two sets.In related news, Kadlecik was just added to the lineup for the inaugural Waterloo Festival in Austin, TX. He’ll be performing with Oteil & Friends, a group led by Dead & Company bassist Oteil Burbridge.last_img read more

Continue reading

Making the most of meals

first_imgHarvard University recently launched an effort to address chronic hunger among its neighbors in Cambridge and Boston by partnering with the local nonprofit Food for Free to donate nearly 2,000 nutritious meals each week to families in need. The initiative builds on Harvard’s long commitment of community engagement, which includes extensive partnerships with local schools and creating and preserving affordable housing.To ensure that breakfast, lunch, and dinner are available for every undergraduate, Harvard University Dining Services regularly purchases more food than is actually consumed. In the past, excess fresh food has been composted. The new program ensures that untouched food is instead provided to those who need it.Graphic by Georgia Bellas/Harvard Staff“This is a new initiative ― a new type of idea,” said Sasha Purpura, executive director of Cambridge-based Food for Free. “The food from Harvard is very healthy, easy to reheat, and simple to serve. None of it has to be cooked from scratch, which is not only time-consuming, but oftentimes not possible as some of our recipients live in motels or on the street where cooking options don’t exist. This is a new way of doing food redistribution and it has really been making a difference in the battle on hunger.”According to surveys, one in nine residents of Eastern Massachusetts doesn’t know where the next meal will come from, with nearly half of the group made up of children and seniors. The Greater Boston Food Bank alone has seen a 21 percent increase in requests for food assistance since 2008. Meanwhile, roughly a third of the food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted, according to the United Nations Environmental Programme.“Every day, too many families and individuals are forced to make very difficult choices — choices between eating or paying rent or utility bills,” said Meredith Weenick, Harvard’s vice president for campus services, which oversees HUDS. “At the same time, Harvard is aggressively seeking to minimize consumption and waste while implementing sustainable programs that increase efficient use of all that we consume on campus. Our partnership with Food for Free assures that any food we offer our students beyond what is utilized also serves our neighbors, so this really is a win-win for everyone involved.”In Harvard’s 14 undergraduate dining halls, the challenge is to maintain a menu that matches the demand of students, nearly 98 percent of whom live on campus and participate in the meal plan. As such, every location has a modest amount of food beyond what is consumed ― including salads, soups, main dishes, and sides. On an average day, the dining halls feed breakfast, lunch, and dinner to more than 6,600 students. That comes to nearly 20,000 meals a day.While HUDS continually monitors consumption, it is impossible to predict precisely how many students will eat and how much they will eat at any given meal. Since 2005, a student peer-to-peer outreach program designed to reduce food waste has halved the amount food being discarded that could otherwise be donated. (Composting has been and will remain part of Harvard’s extensive waste-reduction efforts.)Harvard tested the program last summer using the excess from Annenberg dining hall. Based on its success, all 14 dining halls on campus were brought into the program. In a typical week during the academic year, Harvard may donate up to 2,500 pounds of quality food that was never served. Given that the average meal is 1.3 pounds, each week approximately 2,000 meals are donated to needy families. In the six months since the program began, Harvard has donated more than 40,000 pounds of food.“HUDS has long been committed to giving back to the local community through food donations and various philanthropic activities,” said Managing Director David Davidson. “But this new Harvard food program formalizes and greatly enhances this giving in a way that is more effective, more wide-reaching, and more in line with the University’s commitment to sustainability.”The Harvard Sustainability Plan, released in October 2014, set an on-campus per capita waste-reduction goal of 50 percent by 2020. The Harvard Food Better campaign is engaging the entire University community in a dialogue about the food system, including waste. The Deans’ Food System Challenge, hosted by the Harvard Innovation Lab, is bringing together teams to develop solutions that make the food system more healthy and sustainable.“This new program further demonstrates Harvard’s interest in partnering with providers in the community to create innovative efforts to support local families,” said Kevin Casey, associate vice president for public affairs and communications. “This is a wonderful example of what can happen when local organizations work together to help meet an important community need.”“This is a sustainable program that reflects Food for Free’s mission to address the needs of local families on a daily basis,” said Purpura. “It is a model that is replicable and we hope that our pilot program with Harvard will both feed families and raise awareness at other institutions of higher learning and organizations in Cambridge. We are incredibly excited about this partnership and are looking forward to doing much more in the coming months.”The Cambridge Community Center, which is adjacent to the Peabody Terrace complex, is one of the local organizations receiving donations. The center serves 40 families a week through its after-school program, and has also served the food during family night gatherings and other special events. Eventually the center will have the ability to send after-school students home with meals for their families. A contribution from Harvard helped the center purchase a commercial freezer for storing donations.“These meals can make a real difference for some of our most vulnerable families. We are proud to work with Harvard, Food for Free, and other local organizations in helping to feed our community healthy, wholesome, and delicious food,” said Darrin Korte, director of programs at the Cambridge Community Center.last_img read more

Continue reading

James Backway & More Will Step Into West End’s War Horse

first_img View Comments Based on the Morpurgo novel of the same name and adapted by Nick Stafford, War Horse is set at the dawn of World War I. The play follows a young farm boy named Albert Nerracot who sets out to find his beloved horse Joey after his father sells the animal to the army. The National Theatre production is co-directed by Marianne Elliot and Tom Morris. In addition to Backway as Albert, the new cast will feature Simon Wolfe as Arthur Narracott, Colm Gormley as Ted, Dominic Hodson as Captain Nicholls, Tony McGeever as David Taylor, Alasdair Craig as Friedrich Muller and Clair Louise Connolly as Emilie. Rounding out the cast will be Phillip Bertioli, Ken Bradshaw, Adrian Christopher, Matthew Churcher, Harry De Moraville, Drew Dillon, James Duncan, Nick Figgis, Patrick Fleming, Keiran Flynn, Alan Francis, Ian Houghton, Mark Jackson, Simon Jenkins, Jamie Lee-Morgan, Nyron Levy, Kate Marlais, Shaun McCourt, Jayne Mckenna, Chris Milford, Gary Mitchinson, Ben Murray, Markus Schabbing, Adam Henderson Scott, Alisdair Simpson, James Alexander Taylor, Emma Thurnett, Scarlet Wilderink, Sam Willmott, Thomas Mittleheuser and Lowri Walton.center_img A new crop of actors and puppeteers will join the West End cast of War Horse beginning March 16. James Backway, a recent Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts alum who appeared in the National Theatre’s New Views: Is There Wifi, will take on the central role of Albert at the New London Theatre. He replaces current star Jack Loxton.last_img read more

Continue reading

Baseball goes to bat for Vermont farmers hit by Irene

first_imgOn August 28, 2011 Tropical Storm Irene dumped torrential rain onto the Green Mountains, and Vermonters became victims of historic flooding. Among those who suffered the most devastating losses were the state’s farmers. As part of the nation-wide effort to help, Sam Lincoln and Buster Olney, brothers who grew up on a Randolph Center dairy farm, are raising funds to aid farmers in need through what is being called Going to Bat for Vermont Farmers. The fundraising effort includes an online auction at www.BattingForVermont.com(link is external), a November 12th Baseball Roundtable being held at Vermont Technical College, and direct donations. All proceeds raised through Going to Bat for Vermont Farmers will be donated to the Vermont Farm Disaster Relief Fund. The fund was established by the Vermont Agency of Agriculture and The Vermont Community Foundation in the aftermath of Irene and makes grants directly to farmers affected by the storm. Some of the best minds in baseball will be at the November 12th Roundtable event. Theo Epstein, General Manager of the Boston Red Sox, will join Yankees General Manager Brian Cashman and Pirates General Manager Neal Huntington ‘ as well as longtime baseball reporter Peter Gammons, a descendant of Ethan Allen ‘ for a discussion that includes a question-and-answer session with the audience about their teams, their sport, and offseason plans. There will be limited seating, in three different tiers: VIP Seating, which includes access to a cocktail hour with Epstein, Cashman, Huntington, Gammons and Olney; Premier Seating; and General Admission. Tickets go on sale Wednesday, October 12th online at www.BattingForVermont.com(link is external). The online auction includes memorabilia donated by players, teams, and other celebrities:·         Autographed jerseys and baseballs, including those of Albert Pujols, Stephen Strasburg, Jose Bautista, and Hall of Famers.·         A round of golf with ESPN’s John Kruk.·         A behind-the-scenes tour at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y.·         Tickets to a Toby Keith concert, with a backstage meet-and-greet.·         A meet-and-greet with Tigers pitcher Rick Porcello, whose family owns a Vermont home.·         Ticket packages for several teams. Select memorabilia will be on display at the November 12th Roundtable, and there will be a special presentation for some people instrumental in the flood aftermath. Neal Huntington grew up on a New Hampshire farm. Peter Gammons is an analyst for MLB Network and NESN, and formerly of the Boston Globe and ESPN. Theo Epstein has been the Boston general manager for a decade, and in that time, the Red Sox have won two World Series. Brian Cashman has been general manager of the Yankees for the last 14 seasons, and in that time, the Yankees have won four World Series. The Vermont Community Foundation is currently celebrating its 25th anniversary. It was started in 1986 with a mission to grow philanthropy in Vermont and ensure that Vermont nonprofits have the resources they need to be effective. Since then, the Foundation has grown to include more than 600 funds established by individuals, businesses, and organizations for a broad range of charitable purposes. The Community Foundation awards approximately $10 million dollars a year in grants, thanks to the donors who work under its umbrella. Additionally, the Foundation offers planned giving, nonprofit agency endowment management, and other services that help charitable partners achieve their missions. For more information, visit www.vermontcf.org(link is external).last_img read more

Continue reading

Bassarath displeased with Tendulkar stand-naming

first_imgPORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad, (CMC) – Trinidad and Tobago Cricket Board(TTCB) president, Azim Bassarath, has made clear his displeasure at a stand at the Brian Lara Stadium being named after Indian batting legend Sachin Tendulkar.Speaking on the contentious issue this week, Bassarath contended there were a host of outstanding former West Indies players from Trinidad and Tobago who were more deserving of the honour.“Why not name a stand after Deryck Murray and I call Deryck Murray’s name first,” the outspoken administrator said.“Why couldn’t we name a stand after Ian Bishop, Gus Logie, Raphick Jumadeen, Larry Gomes – we have a number of people [like] Sonny Ramadhin who had lived just a stone’s throw away from the stadium.“They are great Trinidadians who have made significant contributions to West Indies and Trinidad and Tobago cricket.”It emerged earlier this week that the North West Stand at the Stadium would be named after the Indian icon, who holds the record for the most career runs in Tests with 15 921 from a record 200 matches.He and Lara were contemporaries and are often regarded as the two finest batsmen of the modern era.Chairman of the Sports Company of T&T, Michael Phillips, said the decision to name the stand after Tendulkar, had been on Lara’s advice.Bassarath also took issue with the appointment of a board to run the stadium, stressing the TTCB had been kept out of that decision.“I wasn’t aware that a board being appointed and the Trinidad and Tobago Cricket Board was not consulted and was never consulted with respect to the naming of a board to run the stadium.”last_img read more

Continue reading

Heisler: Lakers vs. Clippers rivalry now has all eyes on Los Angeles

first_imgNow with the Knicks as squalid as the Sterling-era Clippers, East Coast media outlets are sending flights of NBA correspondents west.The Ringer’s Bryan Curtis notes a line of newly minted, L.A.-based NBA writers. The New York Times and Washington Post each have one, as do NBA.com and Fox.com. The Athletic has six writers and podcasters based here. ESPN has a veritable bureau focused on the NBA with Rachel Nichols, Ramona Shelburne, Dave McMenamin, Baxter Holmes, Kevin Arnovitz and Ohm Youngmisuk.Los Angeles, the Wall Street Journal’s Jason Gay told Curtis, has become “Hemingway’s Paris of NBA media dorks.”As for wrinkles, the dorks will have plenty to keep themselves occupied.The Lakers want to go back to being the Lakers of Old … which they haven’t been in this decade, missing the playoffs the past six seasons while averaging 55 losses.Their immediate challenge is securing Anthony Davis, who refused to commit himself beyond this season upon arrival. (“I have one year here, so I’m going make the best of this year. And when that time comes around in the summer or, you know, whenever the season’s over – hopefully, around, you know, mid-June, after we just had a parade and I need a couple days to think – then we can talk about that.”)At 26 to Kawhi Leonard’s 28 and Paul George’s 29, Davis was the prize of the summer – or would have been with any assurance of keeping him – representing a bridge to a future that would enable the Lakers to recruit more stars to join him, as LeBron James recruited A.D. to join him.So, Lakers fans wouldn’t want to see anything go too wrong this season.You know, the way things went despite the arrival of James last season.The Clippers conquered respectability, averaging 52 wins over the past seven seasons. Their challenge is legitimacy in a market in which the Lakers long ago raised the standard to championship-or-bust.Now the Clippers directory starts with owner Steve Ballmer, GM Lawrence Frank and consultant Jerry West, heading a staff of young officials whom other teams keep trying to steal.Their Blake Griffin-Chris Paul-DeAndre Jordan trio that unraveled two seasons ago was a star-studded show, just not good enough to reach the Western Conference finals.It remains to be seen how far the less glamorous, more efficient Kawhi-PG-Lou Williams-Montrezl Harrell nucleus gets, but they look like legitimate contenders (and NBA GMs appear to agree).It also remains to be seen if the Clippers can peel off Lakers fans.It never has happened, but there has never been an opportunity like this.Harry Bluebond, a die-hard Lakers fan, notes he will have more interest in the Clippers with “so many pieces in place and with a great infrastructure from Ballmer to Frank to (Coach) Doc (Rivers) to Kahwi, George, Lou, Montrezl.”On the other hand, Bluebond has seen Lakers owner Jeanie Buss “passing on Jerry West when I knew he wanted back in with the Lakers as a consultant,” to Magic Johnson quitting, to LeBron’s denouncing Daryl Morey’s use of freedom of speech regarding the Hong Kong protestors, noting, “It will take a little time to settle back with the Lakers.”Now to see if this will again be their town. It’s a tale of one city, but whose? Los Angeles vs. Los Angeles, Part One … of many.Yes, it’s finally on. Ever since the Clippers moved here in 1984, people have pushed the notion of an intracity rivalry, but between owner Donald Sterling’s farcical bumbling and the Lakers’ majesty, there never was one.Now there is. You could argue there has been one for years with the Clippers going 23-5 against the Lakers the past seven seasons, but it’s not about winning games in the regular season. It’s about which team(s) can go deep into the playoffs, the only thing that counts here … and it could wind up being “both of them.”In any case, I expect to write about 20 or so Lakers-Clippers updates. I know, why so few?Hey, the season is only 25 weeks long or I would do more.It’s not just the local teams, fans and press girding for excitement.Until recent years, New York was the capital of NBA writers, with access to league officials leading to scoops for media heavyweights, starting with the New York Post’s Pete Vecsey, who invented the breezy notion of NBA columns with his slashing, news-hound style.Vecsey retired to be replaced by … no one. Instead of capitalizing on the opportunity, the Post’s struggling rival, the New York Daily News, laid off NBA columnist Mitch Lawrence, as well as star Knicks beat writer Frank Isola, who tripped adroitly into an on-air role at ESPN.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Continue reading

Athletics World Championships a key test for Qatar

first_imgConstruction teams worked around the clock to finish assembling the elaborate scaffold towers that line the route’s central reservation and will support floodlights for the midnight marathon.– Transport –Qatar has invested heavily in transport infrastructure since being named 2022 World Cup hosts in 2010. It now boasts one of the world’s largest hub airports and Qatar Airways is currently rated the best by an industry body.But it is unclear if the multi-billion-dollar metro system’s yellow line will be ready in time to shuttle spectators to the two new stations near the Khalifa stadium, al-Aziziyah and Sports City, both of which are shaped like Bedouin tents.In the absence of a rail option, fans will access the stadium by road.The area is already popular with motorists and home to a mall, raising the prospect of traffic jams ahead of popular events.Officials were pushing to overhaul several key bottlenecks and junctions across the city ahead of the high-point of the athletics calendar.– Fans –While the Khalifa stadium can hold 46,000 people, it will be configured for fewer fans during the World Championships with organisers hoping to attract around 14,000 spectators to the highest profile events.Tickets are “selling well” according to an official, and members of Qatar’s expatriate work force — Kenyans and Americans in particular — are expected to turn out.It remains to be seen though how many fans from neighbouring Bahrain, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates will make it to Doha for the event.The three countries, along with Egypt, have enforced a boycott of Qatar since June 2017 and their citizens are technically banned from travelling to the peninsula state.The Riyadh-led coalition accuses Qatar of backing extremist groups and Iran, charges it denies — raising the spectre that politics could partially overshadow the athletics.Nonetheless Saudi will send three athletes, Egypt five, the UAE one, and Bahrain 21 competitors in total.Share on: WhatsApp Khalifa International StadiumDoha, Qatar | AFP | Qatar is preparing to welcome thousands of fans and competitors for the World Athletics Championships starting Friday, an event seen as a staging post towards the 2022 football World Cup.The 10-day event in the capital Doha will be a key test ahead of the football extravaganza in the gas-rich Gulf monarchy, although the track and field showcase will play out on a far smaller scale.World Cup organisers and football fans will be anxious to see if Qatar can overcome problems encountered at a recent World Cup qualifying fixture, stubborn Doha traffic and unfinished public transport to deliver a smooth championships.An ongoing diplomatic spat between Qatar and several neighbours could threaten to overshadow the competition, as well as possibly dent the numbers of spectators and competitors.This is how Qatar has prepared for the tournament in key areas:– Security –Qatari pro-government media has heavily publicised recent training exercises staged by the US FBI in Doha to equip Qatari officers with “crisis and disaster management” skills.The city was ranked the world’s second safest by CEOWORLD magazine last month behind Abu Dhabi, capital of regional rival the United Arab Emirates.However the Worlds hosts will be looking to avoid a repeat of chaotic scenes that played out during a World Cup qualifying fixture between Qatar and India earlier this month.Indian fans with tickets were unable to access the venue and a surge of fans attempted to storm the ground during half-time as security staff struggled to bring the situation under control.– Venues –Ahead of the opening ceremony, hundreds of volunteers were marshalled around Doha’s Khalifa stadium by police while technicians hoisted vast lighting rigs into place in the venue’s intricate lattice-work roof.Chief organiser Dahlan al-Hamad said at a recent sports integrity event in Doha that “Qatar is 100 percent ready for the championship — we are very excited”.The stadium, which will host most events, was first opened in 1976 but totally overhauled ahead of a relaunch in 2017 and has since successfully hosted Diamond League events.The city’s Corniche waterfront will be used for the marathon, being staged for the first time at midnight when the temperature will be lower. The route will also host the men’s and women’s 20 kilometre race walks and the mixed 50 kilometre race walk.last_img read more

Continue reading

Ben and Sammy looking to end year on a high note

first_img11 Dec 2013 Ben and Sammy looking to end year on a high note English boy champion Ben Amor (Marlborough, Wiltshire) and girl international Sammy Fuller (Roehampton, Surrey) will seek to add to England’s past successes in the event when they compete in the Junior Orange Bowl at Biltmore Golf Club, Florida, on 27th – 30th December. Amor (image © Leaderboard Photography), 18, won the English boys title for the Carris Trophy after a three-way playoff at West Lancashire Golf Club in July. He finished tied with on 286, two under par, with Italy’s Renato Paratore and Jamie Li from Bath but won with a par at the second extra hole. Amor, a member of the re-constituted England ‘A’ squad, also finished third in the Welsh Open Youths Championship, fourth in the Canadian Junior Challenge and won all six of his games on his England debut in the Boys Home Internationals. Fuller, 14, was in England’s winning team at the Girls’ Home Internationals and represented GB&I in the Junior Vagliano Trophy. This year, she also had top-ten finishes in the women’s Welsh Open, Irish Open and English Close Championships, she won the Bridget Jackson Bowl and was third on the 2013 Lorrin Golf England girls’ Order of Merit. She is a past English under 13 girls’ champion. Sammy has enjoyed much success in the US. Last winter, she set a transatlantic record with her sixth consecutive win in the Pars Florida International Junior Championship. She has won her way through the age groups every year since 2006 and in 2012 won both the under 14 division and the overall girls’ prize. On the same visit to the States she won her age group in the Honda Junior Classic for the third straight time. The prestigious Junior Orange Bowl is an under 18 event and has separate boys and girls tournaments over 72 holes of stroke play. Two English boys have won the title. Ben Parker, now a professional, won over the Biltmore course in 2005 while Patrick Kelly triumphed by 13 strokes a year ago. Stiggy Hodgson, who has also turned professional, finished runner-up in 2008.last_img read more

Continue reading

Tumwater Planning Commission to Hold Public Hearing on Draft Shoreline…

first_imgThe public is invited to attend the hearing and offer comment. Please mail any written comments to Tim Smith, Planning Manager, Community Development Department, City of Tumwater, 555 Israel Road SW, Tumwater, WA  98501. Comments may also be emailed to [email protected]  Copies of the Draft Shoreline Master Program and Ordinance No. O2012-005 are available for review in the Community Development Department at Tumwater City Hall during regular business hours (Monday – Friday, 8:00am – 5:00pm). The documents are also available online at http://www.ci.tumwater.wa.us/ShorelineMasterProgram.html Ordinance No. O2012-005 proposes amendments to Title 16 (Environment) and 18 (Zoning) of the Tumwater Municipal Code (TMC) related to the Shoreline Master Program and the adoption of the following TMC chapters into the Shoreline Program by reference: Chapter 16.20 (Geologically Hazardous Areas), Chapter 16.28 (Wetlands), Chapter 16.32 (Fish and Wildlife Habitat), and Chapter 18.38 (Floodplain Overlay). Amendments also include a new table for calculating wetland buffer width standards. The proposed Shoreline Master Program sets forth policies, development standards and procedures for regulating uses and activities within the shoreline jurisdiction of Barnes Lake, Black Lake, Capitol Lake, Munn Lake, Lake Susan, Trosper Lake, Black Lake Drainage Ditch, Deschutes River and a portion of Percival Creek. The Draft Shoreline Master Program will apply to properties in shoreline jurisdiction located within the Tumwater City Limits. Properties located outside of the Tumwater City Limits will be regulated by the Shoreline Master Program only after annexation into the City of Tumwater.center_img Facebook0Tweet0Pin0The Tumwater Planning Commission will hold a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 10, 2012 in the Council Chambers, Tumwater City Hall, 555 Israel Road SW, Tumwater, WA, for the purpose of considering the Draft Shoreline Master Program and Ordinance No. O2012-005 related to implementation of the Shoreline Master Program.last_img read more

Continue reading