Let the admissions begin

first_imgSeven hundred and seventy-two students have been admitted to the Harvard College Class of 2016 through the Early Action program, which was reinstated this year after a four-year absence.“Their academic, extracurricular, and personal promise are remarkable by any standard, and it will be exciting to follow their progress over the next four years and beyond,” said William R. Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions and financial aid.The Admissions Committee admitted fewer students than in the most recent years of Early Action, when between 813 and 902 were admitted from applicant pools that ranged from 3,869 to 4,214, slightly fewer than this year’s 4,231.“Given increases in our overall applicant numbers over the past few years to nearly 35,000 last year, the Admissions Committee took great care to admit only those we were certain would be admitted in Regular Action,” said Fitzsimmons.The admitted group is more diverse ethnically than any previous early cohort and is comparable with the current freshman class.  Although it is difficult to make precise comparisons to previous years because of changes in federal requirements concerning collecting and reporting race and ethnicity information, 9.6 percent of admitted students this year are African-American, compared with 7.2 percent the last time Harvard had Early Action. There was a similar increase for Latinos (9.9 percent vs. 7.9 percent) and Native Americans and Native Hawaiians (1.7 percent vs. 1 percent), and a slight decrease for Asian Americans (22 percent vs. 23 percent). The current freshman class is 19 percent Asian American, 10 percent African-American, 10.2 percent Latino, and 1.7 percent Native American and Native Hawaiian.It is still too early to determine the socioeconomic composition of the admitted group because many students have not yet submitted financial information.“Preliminary information such as requests for application-fee waivers indicates that there could well be more economic diversity than in previous early cohorts,” said Sarah C. Donahue, director of financial aid.  “We stand ready to help families that require financial assistance, including those that might be interested in a variety of financing options.”Admitted financial aid applicants will be informed of their awards as soon as they complete their forms.  All applicants to Harvard, Early or Regular (Jan. 1 application deadline for March 29 notification) have access to Harvard’s new Net-Price Calculator (NPC), a simple, one-page application available on the NPC website that provides an estimate of a family’s eligibility under Harvard’s generous need-based financial aid program.Families with annual incomes of $65,000 or less and normal assets are no longer required to contribute to their children’s educational expenses.  Those with incomes from $65,000 to $150,000 pay on a sliding scale up to 10 percent of annual income, and there is also need-based aid available to families with incomes greater than $150,000.  Home equity and retirement funds are not considered in the calculations, and students are no longer required to take out loans.  More than 60 percent of Harvard students receive need-based financial aid and receive grants averaging more than $40,000.Applicants were notified of the Admissions Committee’s decisions on Dec. 15.  In addition to the 772 admitted students, 2,838 were deferred and will be considered in the Regular Action process, 546 were denied, 25 withdrew, and 50 were incomplete.  Early Action at Harvard is nonbinding for admitted students, who are free to apply to other institutions and need only reply to Harvard by May 1, the National Common Notification Date.“Admitted students will hear a great deal from us over the months ahead,” said Marlyn McGrath, director of admissions.  Faculty, staff, undergraduate recruiters, and alumni/ae will use phone calls, emails, and regular mailings to reach admitted students with information about Harvard.  Many Harvard clubs will host local parties during the winter holidays and in April.  All admitted students will be invited to Cambridge on April 21-23 for the Visiting Program.“We want our admitted students to be fully informed about Harvard, as they make their decisions about which of the many fine colleges to which they have been admitted provides the best match for them at this important time in their lives,” she added.last_img read more

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Global Programs 2015

first_imgBuilding the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ international reputation and a robust global community of support are the main goals of the college’s Office of Global Programs. With a full slate of research, academic and outreach activities and the introduction of a new strategic plan, 2015 has been a banner year for the office. More than 200 CAES faculty, staff, and students traveled abroad during 2015. Whether it was to attend or teach classes, work on an outreach project, complete an internship or perform field research, each trip helped to expand CAES’s international community, enhance its partnerships and extend its reach. CAES faculty and administrators traveled to Brazil, Ecuador, Indonesia, Italy, Mexico, Qatar, Senegal, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam to recruit graduate students and to develop outreach and exchange programs. To read more about one of these recruitment programs visit tinyurl.com/VietnamUGA. The office hosted international scholars through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) funded Borlaug Higher Education for Agricultural Research and Development (BHEARD) Program and supported the Feed the Future Peanut and Mycotoxin Innovation Lab (PMIL), a multipronged research program. To learn more about these programs visit tinyurl.com/BEHEARDUGA and pmil.caes.uga.edu. “Looking ahead (into 2016), we will continue enhancing our international footprint,” said Amrit Bart, director of the CAES Office of Global Programs. “We hope to provide more students with immersive intercultural experiences and intensify our efforts to promote research collaborations with international partners.”Guided by a new strategic plan that was finalized in early 2015, the office is working to support more international experiences for Georgia-based students and faculty and to recruit more international students and scholars to the college. This includes increasing financial support for student and faculty travelers and developing new partnerships in Asia and Africa, Bart said. For more details about the strategic plan visit global.uga.edu/news/2015/StrategicPlanComplete.html. “Too often strategic plans collect dust on a shelf. In the case of the Office of Global Programs, we’re referring to our plan on a daily basis as we decide how to assist CAES students and faculty to achieve their goals,” Bart said. “We are laying the groundwork for partnerships that will impact the University of Georgia from a student’s first day of class to a faculty member’s entire career.”Here are more highlights from the Office of Global Programs’ year: About 162 faculty and staff members from the college made 249 international trips, either as part of a research or outreach project or as part of a study abroad program.CAES welcomed 143 visiting scholars this year. Approximately 75 CAES students studied abroad this year, visiting a total of 26 countries. The top five most popular destinations were Costa Rica, Italy, Australia, France and New Zealand. The college organized and led four specific study abroad programs, including “Europe: The Grand Tour – Art and Gardens;” “Costa Rica: Coffee from Bean to Cup;” “Italy: Viticulture and Enology;” and “France: French Food Production, Culture and the Environment.”Dozens of international graduate and undergraduate students came to study at the college’s Griffin, Tifton or Athens, Georgia, campuses. To stay up to date on the CAES Office of Global Programs, visit global.uga.edu.last_img read more

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The state leases former tourist resorts

first_imgThe Ministry of State Property has announced a public call for bids for the lease of real estate, more precisely the lease of former tourist resorts.Former resorts are located in Gradac, Rab, Biograd na Moru and Slano and Igrane. Although the real estate is in a very bad condition and needs a complete renovation, at least according to the photos shown, but as it is a lease of real estate for a period of 30 years, there is certainly enough time to return the investment.The deadline for submitting bids is December 10, 2018, and you can see all the details and a photo presentation of the resort in the attachment.Attachment: PUBLIC INVITATION FOR SUBMISSION OF BIDS FOR LEASE OF REAL ESTATElast_img read more

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