OULC introduce gender-balanced electoral college

first_imgThe motion was also criticised for giving women an unfair advantage in the democratic process. Alastair Holder-Ross, a member of the OULC, said, “I think it’s incredibly important to promote women’s roles within the club and support Helena Dollimore especially in all she has done to that end. However, I think sacrificing fundamental democratic principles is not the best way to serve the cause of gender equality. The amendment does not deal with the causes of the gender imbalance within the club, even if its intentions are noble.”Rebecca Grant, OULC Women’s Officer who proposed the motion, said, “It does indeed give women a disproportionate advantage – this is the aim of the motion. The turnout of women is a sustained and serious problem which needs to be tackled. One of the best things about the motion is that it adapts as its aims are fulfilled; if more women are encouraged to attend meetings, the relative weight of each vote will go down.“We have to remember that men have always had, and continue to have, a ‘disproportionate advantage’, and positive and decisive action is needed to redress the balance. It seems odd to be worried about privileging women when women make up less than 20% of the Labour club executive, on average.”The amendment was passed in a Constitutional Convention on the 6th constitution. OULC were required to reform their constitution after a decision was made by the University Proctors to set a standard for all university-affiliated societies. This raised concerns about how the amendment was to be repealed and whether it needed to be passed on two separate occasions.Other criticism included the fact that the email detailing the Electoral College motion was sent only 2 1⁄2 hours before the meeting. In response, Grant claimed, “The circulation of the motion prior to the meeting was entirely in line with constitutional requirements. Some other constitutional amendments, such as proxy voting, were introduced and passed at the meeting with no notice at all given beforehand.”Nick Hilton, a member of the OULC, commented to Cherwell, “Imposing a uniform constitution on Oxford University societies and clubs has worrying implications for their autonomy. The new OULC constitution has been rushed through in order to meet a deadline, mainly so that we can retain the ‘U’ in our name and get a discount on our Fresher’s Fair stall. The proctors are trying to avoid societies embarrassing the University, to which they are affiliated, and, by doing so, control their operations. I think this is a significant and deliberate overreach of their authority.”A University spokesperson said, “Clubs registered with the Proctors are required to follow the rules laid out in the constitution. This is the implementation of a decision of the Rules Committee which took effect from October 2013 with an academic year’s grace period for existing clubs. The Proctors’ Office is happy to advise individual clubs on specific issues as necessary and to listen to feedback on the constitution. A review of the general oversight of clubs has been agreed and will commence shortly.” The Oxford University Labour Club (OULC) has passed a constitutional amendment introducing gender-balanced electoral colleges that allocate 50% of the voting power in executive elections to people who do not self-identify as men.In Termly General Meetings, when the executive committee is elected, voters are now divided into two electoral colleges: those who self-identify as men and those who do not.Each electoral college receives equal weight when voting. Anna Coombes, Women’s Officer Elect for OULC, said, “The motion passed with considerable support, with only one vote in opposition and two abstentions. The main concern raised at the meeting was concerning one person, one vote.“However, the policy does not act to remove this, as each voter still casts only one vote. The idea of the policy is that the women’s voice within the group carries the same weight as the men’s. This does indeed mean giving women an advantage, but we (women in attendance of the Women’s Working Group where the motion was first discussed) felt that such action was necessary in order to address the considerable imbalance that currently prevails within the club.“Considering that women make up over half of OULC’s membership it is undemocratic and unacceptable that women consistently make up such a small proportion of the executive.“Looking at this, there is no doubt that there is a problem of womens’ turnout within OULC. This is not due to a lack of trying; the motion was proposed as a last resort after many other initiatives have been tried.”Representation of women on the OULC executive committee averages at below 20%. In Hilary Term a Women’s Working Group was set up in order to devise measures to tackle the low levels of participation and representation of women in OULC. One student pointed out that, judging by past turnout to Termly General Meetings, women could have 5 times the voting power of the men present.last_img read more

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More opportunities for women

first_imgSEOUL — Speaking in South Korea to conclude a five-day visit to Asia, Harvard President Drew Faust urged greater worldwide educational opportunities for women, telling an audience of more than 500 at Ewha Womans University that “the challenge is not only to educate females, but to create opportunities for their skills and talents to help build better and more prosperous societies, as well as improved women’s lives.”Ewha, the world’s largest women’s university, designated Faust only the second distinguished honorary Ewha fellow during a ceremony Friday that included remarks from Ewha President Kim Sun-Uk, a performance of traditional Korean music, and a roundtable for Faust and Kim with 20 young women studying at Ewha.In her speech, “Educate Women; Change the World,” Faust said it was important to continue to make the case for educational opportunities for women at a time when they remain dramatically underrepresented in many areas, including business and government.“How we define success in the education of women, whether in the United States or South Korea or worldwide, remains an open and pressing question,” said Faust. “Dramatic gender gaps persist. No society, no nation, has fully freed us from the question: Why educate women?”Faust highlighted the potential global economic benefits that would accrue from greater access to education for women. She pointed to the 2012 Global Gender Gap Report, which concluded that reducing the male-female employment gap in developed countries could lead to a GDP increase of as much as 9 percent in the United States and 13 percent in the eurozone.“Every nation’s long-term competitiveness depends on how well it educates and brings into play its women and girls,” said Faust.“The most valuable resource in the world is human talent. Unleashing that talent is one of society’s great challenges,” she said. “A growing body of analysis shows that for all kinds of reasons, any society that leaves out the wide talent pool of females is undermining its effectiveness — whether it loses the benefits of balance in corporate leadership roles, or the superior creativity and problem-solving capacities of diverse working teams.”Faust also discussed the importance of education beyond the economic impact.“We educate women not only because it is fair and efficient. We educate women because it is transformative,” she told the audience of students, faculty members, administrators, and special guests, including a number of ambassadors to South Korea. “The purposes of learning extend beyond quarterly reports and the bottom line, and even the economic and social benefits of a good job or a rising GDP.”“In America and South Korea alike, our zeal for achievement, what you call ‘education fever,’ can distort the deeper purposes of learning and narrow our definition of success,” she said. “When education becomes too focused on immediate measurable outcomes, on grades and awards, or when it becomes merely a path to money or prestige, we risk forgetting the inherent value of learning, and our broader aspirations.”Ewha, which has 20,000 undergraduate and graduate students, was founded in 1886 as Korea’s first educational institution for women. Kim hailed the partnership between Ewha and Harvard that includes academic exchanges between the universities. She also noted that Ewha’s motto — “Where change begins” — aligned with Faust’s remarks on how women can transform the world.The award ceremony was the final Asian stop for Faust, who also hosted a meeting of Korean university leaders and conducted a question-and-answer session with more than 300 Harvard alumni in Seoul.South Korean students represent the third-largest group of international students at Harvard, and the University has more than 1,000 alumni in the country.For the full text of President Drew Faust’s speech at Ewha Womans University.last_img read more

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Parents bring in lawyers for school stoushes

first_imgNZ Herald 29 June 2014A leading psychologist says parents are increasingly bringing lawyers in to work out issues at schools.Nigel Latta, a clinical psychologist and parenting expert, told TVNZ’s Q and A that parents are bringing lawyers in to deal with problems at their child’s school, and it’s wrong.Sixteen-year-old Lucan Battison successfully challenged a suspension from Hastings’ St John’s College after refusing to cut his “naturally curly hair”.The school’s rules set out are that students must have “hair that is short, tidy and of natural colour. Hair must be off the collar and out of the eyes”.Justice David Collins said on Friday that the rule was capable of being interpreted differently by students, parents, teachers, the principal and the school’s board and was not legally enforceable.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11284209Student shown the door for ‘offensive’ hair style3 News 2 July 2014Demetric Blank is a student from Tararua College, in Pahiatua, and has never been suspended or expelled for bad behaviour.But he isn’t allowed to be at school at the moment – why?His new hair style has offended teaching staff and he has been told to grow it out before returning.They also wouldn’t give him the option to shave it all off, because it would be too short for their school policy.So is that fair? His hair style would be seen on most rugby fields and isn’t exactly wild.http://www.3news.co.nz/Student-shown-the-door-for-offensive-hair-style/tabid/817/articleID/347451/Default.aspxlast_img read more

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Greg Huntington, age 52, Osgood

first_imgGregory Allen Huntington Sr., age 52, of Osgood passed away on August 3, 2020 at Christ Hospital in Cincinnati.  Greg was born on June 21, 1968 to Mert and Judy (Palmer) Huntington in Batesville, IN.Greg attended Jac-Cen-Del High School.  After school, he entered the workforce.  He enjoyed his career as a truck driver and opened his own business, Huntington Trucking in 2013.  He wore every title in the endeavor, from mechanic to logistic consultant.Greg would meet and marry his forever partner, Denene Lee, on September 23, 1988.  They were blessed with a son, Greg Jr. and a daughter, Natasha.  Many things had special meaning to Greg, but nothing like his granddaughters.  He loved sharing laughs and hugs with them.He was always quick to make you laugh and was up to date on the most recent jokes.  He had a passion for the outdoors from fishing to shooting guns.  He enjoyed coon hunting and training his favorite dog.Greg is survived by wife Denene, son Greg Allen Huntington Jr., daughter Natasha Nicole (Anthony) Carpenter, granddaughters Katelyn Nicole and Tiffany Lynn, mother Judy Huntington, brother Mert (Rhonda), and numerous uncles, aunts, and cousins.  He was preceded in death by his father Mert.Visitation will be held on Friday August 7, 2020 from 4-7 pm at Neal’s Funeral Home in Osgood.  Funeral services will be held on Saturday August 8, 2020 at 2:30 (Doors will open at 2:00) also at Neal’s Funeral Home.  In accordance with the state mandate, mask will be required.   Memorials may be given to the family in care of the funeral home.  Online condolences can be left at Nealsfuneralhome.netlast_img read more

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Kohli denies rift with coach before Pakistan match

first_img(REUTERS)-Indian skipper Virat Kohli has denied reports of a rift between himself and coach Anil Kumble on the eve of his team’s Champions Trophy Group B opener against arch-rivals Pakistan at Edgbaston today.Reports of a falling out between Kohli and Kumble emerged after India’s cricket board (BCCI) invited applications for the head coach’s role last week, despite the team’s excellent results since Kumble took over last June.Kumble has guided the team to just one defeat in 17 tests since taking charge, and the BCCI has made it clear that it will also consider extending his contract.“There are no issues whatsoever,” Kohli told a news conference on Saturday. “There has been a lot of speculation and a lot of things written by people without actually being a part of the changing room, which is very strange.“There are no problems whatsoever. The team is totally focussed on the Champions Trophy.”Kohli said differences of opinion were part and parcel of the game, and that the board’s invitation for applications was a routine matter.“In any walk of life there are agreements and disagreements always,” he added. “These are normal things. Even at home you do not agree on everything with your family.“If something is put in place as a process, I don’t see why people are creating so many speculations about it. It has been followed last time as well, and I didn’t see any issues being created last time. So it is the same process.“It is just happening after 12 months.”Pressed on his own relationship with Kumble, Kohli said he was enjoying working under the former India captain.“It’s been really good. The whole journey has been good,” he added.last_img read more

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