RAF flies high at advertising awards

first_img Previous Article Next Article RAF flies high at advertising awardsOn 20 Jan 2004 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Thetop award at the RBI Recruitment Advertising Awards 2004 went to the RAF andagency J Walter Thompson. The event, at the Grosvenor House Hotel in London,was hosted by actor Steve Coogan, in his guise as Norwich’s favourite son, AlanPartridge.Partridgeraised the roof with his observations, largely at the expense of the event’ssponsors and the people of Scotland.Hesaid he was disappointed that a fact-finding trip to the North revealed thatwhile all homeless people in England were Scottish, it was not the reversenorth of the border as they were all Scottish too. This is, of course, not theview of Personnel Today.Judgesat the awards had to choose between 600 entries for the 18 categories, andagency AIA took home seven awards.Otherwinners included HM Prison Service in the Central Government & GovernmentAgencies category, Virgin Atlantic Airways for general appointments, theTerritorial Army for best employer website and London Borough of Barking &Dagenham in the local government/ education category.Recruitment-marketing.co.ukgave away a Mini, which Partridge said was a lovely prize, if a little cramped. Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Tomlinson proposals could ease skills gap

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Few in HR will have missed the publication of the Tomlinson report thisweek. It promises the biggest shake up in secondary education for some 50years. The issue is far too important for knee-jerk reactions, and companieswill need to see the entire package of the proposals, as well as the finalreport due in the autumn, before giving any firmer endorsement to the proposedchanges. Take a walk round some companies and you will find that for the vastmajority, the subjects of basic skills, recruitment and retention of the mosttalented staff are right at the top of the agenda. Evidence abounds that thelack of basic skills is damaging to UK productivity and is a major reasonbehind the gap with our major competitors. “Give us the tools and we will do the job,” Winston Churchill onceremarked. But how many of the right tools will the proposed changes toeducation outlined in the Tomlinson report give to employers? The emphasis on placing vocational education on a par with the traditionalacademic route is of great significance for manufacturing employers, especiallywith the commitment to integrate modern apprenticeships and other vocationalqualifications into the proposed diploma framework. This should help to ensurevocational qualifications are seen to be of equal value to academic ones, and encouragemany more people to consider courses such as engineering GCSEs and advancedmodern apprenticeships. Industry will also strongly endorse the working group’s concerns about thequality of informed and impartial guidance being given to 14 to 19-year-oldsduring their education and training. A recent survey of first year apprenticesconfirmed that most are being offered little or no information on post-16options other than full-time education. Failure to provide more resources forsuch guidance will result in the greater emphasis on vocational education andqualifications being left dead in the water. The EEF will be urging theChancellor to devote greater resources to this in the forthcoming spendingreview. However, while the report hits many of the right notes, manufacturingcompanies will reserve judgement on the ‘specialist diplomas’ until they seeexactly how they will be designed. The working group’s efforts to tackle thearbitrary distinction between academic, vocational and occupational courses iswelcome, it is vital that the new qualifications maintain the standard set bythe current system of GCSEs and A-levels if they are to gain the confidence ofemployers. People know what they are buying with the current system of qualifications.Whichever way the new ones are designed, it is vital that they do not lose theclear credibility that currently exists and which young people and employersclearly understand. By Ian Peters, Director of external affairs, Engineering Employers Federation(EEF) Tomlinson proposals could ease skills gapOn 24 Feb 2004 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Police diversity scheme is a success

first_imgMorewomen and Catholics are working for the police force in Northern Irelandthan ever before, thanks to a controversial diversity programme aimed atcreating a service free from partisan control.MauraMuldoon, divisional manager for the Northern Ireland Police Service, told apublic sector conference in Londonlast week that a 50:50 recruitment policy had been introduced, with oneCatholic officer appointed for every non-Catholicrecruited. It wants 50 per cent of the service to be made up of Catholics inthe next few years. Upto four years ago, it was dominated by Protestants and other faiths, with lessthan 10 per cent of the workforce being Catholic. But a recent recruitmentcampaign led to 6,500 applications when only 450 are needed in Northern Irelandeach year.Anotherknock-on effect of the 50:50 rulehas been a dramatic increase in the number of women applying for jobs in theservice. More than 40 per cent of all new recruits are now female.Muldoonadmitted the rule had been widely contested to the point where the policy waschallenged in the House of Lords, but it was later upheld. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Police diversity scheme is a successOn 21 Sep 2004 in Police, Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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Spotlight on: volunteering

first_imgSpotlight on: volunteeringOn 21 Feb 2006 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article If HR managers are keen to climb the career ladder, they must show how their attitude, application and abilities can make a real difference to the business as a whole.In many environments – and HR is certainly one of them – managers have to be able to work with individuals who work at different speeds and share different values and interests. HR managers need to consider the ‘broader picture’ and have the ability to communicate, influence and deliver results that affect the long-term strategic direction of their business. So how can these skills be developed?One answer is through training and development. Qualifications certainly help as they can challenge and benchmark individuals. But they do so against defined criteria. So, as someone wanting to progress within HR, how can you develop, yet still stand out from the crowd?A study published by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and Volun-tary Service Overseas (VSO), reveals that voluntary work can help you improve the skills needed to further your career and, at the same time, give you experience in wider business areas.But just undertaking voluntary activity is not enough. Some employers still believe it is a distraction, with only one in 10 volunteers involved in a programme through work. So it is important to be able to position the skills that you learn to demonstrate how they directly apply to your day-to-day work.After all, most HR managers would say that recruiting someone depends on how they present themselves and their experience. So practise what you preach. In the same way that you look for evidence of competency when recruiting, think about how you can highlight and present the skills you learn.In practical terms, this may involve recording activity in a workbook for your continuous professional development or assessment by potential employers. But you need to make it relevant. If you are volunteering for a local charity, for example, consider how the skills you develop relate to the budgetary element of your role.CMI’s research also identified alignment between skills gaps in organisations and those being developed through voluntary work. Almost all respondents said they were now more capable of handling different cultures, and about half claimed that volunteering developed problem-solving abilities.These newly acquired skills could also make you more employable. Many organisations are short of skills such as diversity management, or communication and conflict management – all of which can be developed through voluntary work.There is a clear argument to support voluntary activity as a route to improving the skills you, and your employer, need. In today’s flatter organisations, we are all aware that the concepts of a ‘linear career structure’ or a ‘job for life’ are becoming anachronistic, but you can be proactive in managing your career development.HR managers should recognise that by sharing and publicising their skills, not only can they play a significant role within the wider community, but they can also influence their future career and contribute to their company’s success.Top 5 skills developed by volunteersCommunicationsInfluencing and persuadingProject managementManaging changeCoaching and mentoringSource: Chartered Management InstituteJo Causon is the director of marketing and corporate affairs at the Chartered Management Institute. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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BA expects record loss leading to ‘permanent cost reductions’

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. BA expects record loss leading to ‘permanent cost reductions’By Personnel Today on 5 Feb 2010 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. British Airways (BA) is on track to make a record annual pre-tax loss despite a surprise operating profit of £25m in the three months to December, it has emerged.BA’s pre-tax loss in the nine months to December 2009 rose to £342m, from £70m in the same period in 2008. With a further three months of the financial year to come, the airline is expected to exceed last year’s record loss of £401m.The news comes as BA is locked in a High Court battle with union Unite, which claims it was never consulted over changes to cabin crew contracts. A result of a ballot later this month may show the airline is facing further industrial action, after the Christmas strike was cancelled by the courts.The company said in a statement: “Our focus on permanent cost reduction must continue if we are to return the business to profitability in the short term.”Chief executive Willie Walsh added the airline was working with staff, unions and trustees on ways to address a £3.7bn pension fund deficit. BA is also discussing a range of changes to future pension benefits, according to the Telegraph. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Following best practice in occupational health has wider business benefits, evidence from HSE shows

first_img There’s a simple way of increasing business efficiency that many executives overlook, according to the Health & Safety Executive (HSE). Their experts argue that embedding occupational health in the wider business culture enhances efficiency, and can even increase profits.HSE Inspectors are best known as enforcers of health and safety regulations, protecting lives and livelihoods, but they also influence and educate, working with employers to help them innovate, be productive and grow.OH Specialist Susan Donnelly points to a small manufacturer, who called “out of the blue” to thank her after seeing a 75% increase in profits. “When I visited there was a problem with occupational asthma. As the business started to grow and production increased, they’d been supplying employees with masks instead of improving ventilation.“They weren’t happy about my recommendations to spend more money on the problem, but within a year they had won a massive order on the back of their health and safety systems. The new customer said it was rare to find an SME with such good working practices.”Fellow OH Specialist Jenny Hannay agrees. “Good practice is about much more than health surveillance. A lot of employers think it’s a matter of ticking the boxes and offering a few wellbeing initiatives. They only act when there’s an actual health problem.“For example, by the time employees complain of the symptoms of vibration damage, they’ve already become less efficient. A more forward-thinking competitor might already have invested in remote or mechanised systems that are not only better for employee health but actually pay for themselves by increasing productivity.”Heather Cunnington, another HSE OH Specialist, also underlines the importance of integrating occupational health into the fabric of the business. “If health and safety is the responsibility of just one person, when they leave the health and safety culture leaves with them. It should be a board-level commitment.”However, creating workable health and safety regulations isn’t a one-way street. “We know what good practice looks like,” she says, “but that doesn’t mean we have nothing to learn from industry, where materials, equipment and processes are always changing. It’s important to understand issues on the ground and feed that back into HSE policy and recommendations.”Influencing people at all levels, from cleaners to chief executives, takes confidence, good communication skills and real insight into the commercial pressures facing business. It’s a rare combination of skills but one that the HSE is currently looking for as they expand their team.OH Specialists are from a nursing background and are likely to have several years’ industry experience in occupational health. Joining HSE with a Specialist Community Public Health Nurse (SPCHN) qualification forms the basis for further training as a Regulator for HSE. “It’s hard work but it’s worth it,” Susan, Jenny and Heather all agree. “In an internal OH role you help just a few people at a time, in these roles we help the whole workforce of Great Britain.”For more information on OH careers with HSE click here.For more information about the benefits of a proactive health and safety culture in the workplace, visit www.hse.gov.ukFor an personal insight watch this short video. Following best practice in occupational health has wider business benefits, evidence from HSE showsBy HSE on 5 Dec 2017 in PROMOTED CONTENT, Health and safety, Health & Safety Executive, Personnel Today, Wellbeing, Work-life balance, Workforce planning Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Brooklyn medical buildings sell for $40M

first_imgFull Name* According to sources familiar with the deal, Lerner’s transaction was a 1031 exchange. Real estate investors with capital gains have been eager to swap their properties before the year’s end since President-elect Joe Biden, as a presidential candidate, proposed eliminating 1031 exchanges — a popular tax deferral benefit — for investors with annual incomes greater than $400,000.Lerner was represented by Kassin Sabbagh Realty’s Bunny Escava and Isaac Setton in the transaction. Escava declined to comment.The seller was Dr. Shahrokh Abiri, a radiologist affiliated with ProHealth, and he was represented by the Rochlin Organization and Scout Healthcare Advisors. Rochlin’s principal Adam Rochlin declined to comment. Abiri couldn’t be reached for comment.Unlike the hospitality or retail real estate sectors, medical and life sciences properties have been among those least affected by the pandemic-driven downturn. Big REITs, including Blackstone and Alexandria Real Estate Equities, have continued to pour money into the sector during the pandemic.Contact Akiko Matsuda Email Address* Share via Shortlink Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinkcenter_img Clockwise from left: 9020 Fifth Avenue, 7115-21 13th Avenue and 7601 Fourth Avenue in Bay Ridge (Google Maps)A set of three medical buildings in Bay Ridge recently traded hands for more than $40 million, in what was reportedly a 1031 exchange transaction.The three buildings, totaling about 61,400 square feet, are located at 7601 Fourth Avenue, 9020 Fifth Avenue, and 7115-21 13th Avenue and are fully occupied by medical tenants such as ProHealth, Quest Diagnostics, and ENT & Allergy Associates, according to marketing materials reviewed by The Real Deal.The buyer was William Lerner, president of Imperial Parking, a parking garage chain in the city that operates as iPark. Lerner, through his shell entities, recently sold three garages in Manhattan to Centerpark for $34.7 million, according to PincusCo. Lerner couldn’t be reached for comment.Read moreStaying ahead on the life science leasing curveLife-sciences sector proves safe haven for landlordsLife sciences deal is Washington state’s largest sale ever TagsbrooklynCommercial Real EstateOffice Real Estate Message*last_img read more

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Retail bloodbath will continue with 10,000 closures this year: report

first_imgShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlink Last year was a bloodbath for on-the-ground retailers. The pandemic exacerbated competition from e-commerce, and job losses and restrictions on non-essential shopping threw salt on the wound.Examples were everywhere. One in every seven chain stores closed in New York City in 2020. Brookfield Property Partners, a major mall owner with 170 retail properties in 43 states, laid off 20 percent of its retail division in September. Store closures from Macy’s, Bed Bath & Beyond and Gap alone accounted for 4,200 store closings.Analysts predict that closures in 2021 could increase by 14 percent, but there are some segments of retail doing well. Discount stores like Dollar General will add 4,000 stores in 2021, the report estimated. Such stores typically fare well during a recession; 1,669 opened last year. Grocery stores are also expected to fare well.[BI] — Georgia Kromrei 8,741 retail stores closed in 2020. (Photo Illustration by The Real Deal, Photos via Getty)Don’t expect brick-and-mortar retail to escape from the discount rack this year, a new report warns.An analysis released this week predicted that as many as 10,000 retail stores could close nationwide in 2021, Business Insider reported. The study, by Coresight Research, found that 8,741 retail stores shut their doors last year, led by 3,151 apparel store closures.Read moreNew York’s Covid-fueld retail apocalypse hits condo and co-op ownersRetail foot traffic tanks on Black Friday Tagsretail bankruptciesRetail Real Estatelast_img read more

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Amazon unveils woodsy plans for HQ2

first_imgRenderings of Amazon HQ2 and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos (Photos via NBBJ/Getty)Amazon has unveiled new plans for its second headquarters in Northern Virginia that will have an outdoorsy, woodsy theme.The tech giant’s second phase of its campus in Arlington, Virginia, will include three 22-story office buildings, a smaller retail building, an outdoor amphitheater, a dog run and parking for about 950 bicycles, according to the Wall Street Journal. It will be encircled by woodlands.The highlight of the project will be a 350-foot tower named the Helix that features two spiraling outdoor walkways along with trees and plants from Virginia, according to the newspaper. The first buildings of the second phase are expected to be finished in 2025.Inside the buildings, there could be more plants, meeting space, offices and studios for artist residency.The plans are part of the more than $2.5 billion, 25,000-employee office campus known as HQ2.Plans for the second phase have to go through a public review process. Amazon looks to break ground on the project in early 2022. A pair of office buildings that will accommodate 12,500 Amazon employees are already being built nearby.Amazon tapped Washington, D.C.-based architecture firm NBBJ to design the development.Amazon initially planned to build two HQ2 campuses, and chose Long Island City, Queens, in 2018 for the second one, after an intense competition by cities and regions across the nation. But in February 2019, the Seattle-based company scrapped its plans for the New York headquarters after pushback from New York City politicians and activists.Virginia, by contrast, greeted the internet retailer with open arms.Amazon’s design for its Virginia campus could be a harbinger of future office designs as more companies look to bring employees back to the office after switching to remote work during the pandemic.[WSJ] — Keith Larsen Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlinkcenter_img TagsamazonDevelopmentHQ2long island cityPoliticslast_img read more

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Subleases up 40% across US as companies ditch space

first_img Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff and PricewaterhouseCoopers US Chairman Tim Ryan (Getty, PwC)JPMorgan Chase, Salesforce and PricewaterhouseCoopers are among a growing number of firms looking to sublease space as the demand for traditional offices diminishes.About 137 million square feet of office space was up for sublease across the U.S. at the end of last year, according to CBRE Group, the Wall Street Journal reported. That represents a 40 percent annual increase and the most since 2003.Read moreYelp. PWC test options on Manhattan’s sublease marketManhattan sublease space at record high after 47% jumpJPMorgan to sublet office space as it ponders work from home Share via Shortlink Commercial Real EstateJPMorganManhattanoffice marketcenter_img Companies are aiming to reduce their physical presence as they plan to let employees work from home at least some of the time, but are locked into long-term leases.For landlords, subleases are a thorn in the office market. Sublease space typically commands a 25 percent discount from the previous price, David Falk, president of the New York tri-state region at Newmark, told the Journal.JPMorgan began subletting its 700,000 square feet of office space in lower Manhattan earlier this year, according to the publication. PricewaterhouseCoopers and Yelp are also trying to sublet their space in New York.[WSJ] — Keith Larsen Tagslast_img read more

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