‘A Benefit For Creative Music Studio’ With Oteil Burbridge, Joe Russo, Cyro Baptista, More Announces Livestream

first_imgTonight, a very special Benefit for Creative Music Studio event is going down at the Brooklyn Bowl.The New York City benefit has tapped a star-studded lineup including Billy Martin, Cyro Baptista, Dave Harrington, Fay Victor, Ingrid Sertso, Joe Russo, Jonathan Goldberger, Karl Berger, Ken Filiano, Marc Ribot, Marshall Allen, Oteil Burbridge, Peter Apfelbaum, Robert Walter, Steven Bernstein, and Stuart Bogie. Without a doubt, tonight will be special.While tickets are still available here, with proceeds going to benefit the Creative Music Foundation, Relix is offering a live stream for those unable to attend the concert. To join the “couch tour” party, click here.last_img read more

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Wilco Announces Knoxville Theater Performances Following 17-Month Layoff

first_imgWilco is back with their first scheduled performances in the U.S. since November 2017.On Tuesday morning, the rock band announced their forthcoming return to the stage when they set up shop for two performances at the Bijou Theatre in Knoxville, TN on June 5th-6th.  The two shows will also act as a warmup for their run of European tour dates scheduled to begin on June 12th and continuing over seven performances before wrapping on June 22nd. The band is also scheduled to perform at their Solid Sound Festival in North Adams, MA the weekend of June 28th–3oth.Related: Jeff Tweedy Performs On ‘The Late Show’ And Admits Embarrassing Lies With ColbertWilco did not reveal whether or not they will have any new material by the time they hit the road this summer. Considering singer/guitarist Jeff Tweedy has written, recorded, and released three solo albums within the last three years (in addition to sparring with political opponents during his shows), the chances of Wilco sharing their first studio effort since 2016’s Schmilco is highly unlikely. Speaking of Tweedy, the band’s principle songwriter just wrapped his own solo run of spring tour dates in support of 2019’s WARMER.Tickets for both newly-announced Knoxville shows will go on sale this Friday, May 3rd, at 10 a.m. ET. Fans can head to the band’s website for more tickets and detailed tour info.last_img read more

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Post-traumatic stress

first_imgThe diagnosis and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder has come a long way since the 1970s, with research now showing it is both more common and more treatable than once thought.While early doubters dismissed the condition as a Western phenomenon that arose because researchers pathologized a nonmedical condition, subsequent research identified physiological changes to the brain because of extreme trauma and led to the development of a consistent ability to diagnose the condition, both in Western and other nations.In fact, while surveys show that 7.8 percent of Americans have experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the numbers are far higher in some other nations, particularly those that have experienced intense violence. In Algeria and Cambodia, for example, which suffered through long civil wars, 37 percent and 28 percent of their populations, respectively, have experienced PTSD, studies say.Terry Keane, a longtime PTSD researcher, Boston University psychiatry professor, and associate chief of staff for research and development at the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, described progress in recent decades in understanding PTSD during a talk at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) Tuesday (March 23). Keane delivered his remarks as part of the Barry R. Bloom Public Health Practice Leadership Speaker Series, sponsored by the HSPH Division of Public Health Practice.Though rates of PTSD are not as high in the United States as in some war-torn nations, Keane said surveys show that PTSD is nonetheless a significant problem. Further, he said, studies show that the numbers and the levels of disability of those suffering from PTSD are higher than those of conditions such as major depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder.In the United States, women tend to develop PTSD at higher rates than men, something Keane said is not fully understood but that may be related to the personal nature of violence against women. About 60.7 percent of men experience trauma severe enough to potentially trigger PTSD during their lifetimes, with 8.1 percent of them developing PTSD. For women, 51.2 percent experience trauma, with 20.4 percent developing PTSD.PTSD is caused by an extreme trauma, which Keane described as a “massively disturbing event” that sparks intense alarm, anger, or distress. The condition is marked by apprehension and avoidance behaviors.PTSD also imposes an economic burden on society, Keane said, with its sufferers missing 3.6 days a month from work, costing an estimated $3 billion in lost productivity annually.“Can you imagine trying to hold down a job when you miss one day a week?” Keane asked.The biggest cause of PTSD is the sudden and unexpected death of a loved one, Keane said. In that case, PTSD is different from the normal grieving that such a loss would cause and is triggered by particularly horrific or difficult conditions surrounding the death. Other major causes of the ailment are wartime combat, sexual violence, and community violence.Those suffering PTSD can feel its effects for decades, Keane said. Progress in treating the condition has resulted in several therapeutic approaches and medicines that can help. Keane said he is very hopeful about the prospects of identifying and treating patients. One of the biggest challenges, though, is education to raise awareness.“I am so hopeful,” Keane said. “[We can] turn around a devastating condition, a costly condition … if we can just get this [information] out.”last_img read more

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House masters appointed

first_imgHarvard College Dean Evelynn M. Hammonds, the Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and of African and African-American Studies, today (March 26) announced the appointment of three House masters. Rakesh and Stephanie Khurana will become master and co-master of Cabot House. Douglas Melton and Gail O’Keefe will assume those roles at Eliot House, while Christie McDonald and Michael David Rosengarten will oversee Mather House.Last month, James L. Cavallaro, clinical professor of law at Harvard Law School (HLS) and executive director of the HLS Human Rights Program, and his wife, Nadejda Marques, were appointed interim master and co-master of Harvard College’s Currier House for the 2010-11 academic year.“I’m tremendously pleased that such outstanding scholars — and talented, enthusiastic members of the Harvard community — will be taking on these important and influential roles,” Hammonds said. “Each of the new masters — Professors Rakesh Khurana, Doug Melton, and Christie McDonald — are leading scholars in their fields. But more important than their scholarly contributions, they are, alongside their spouses, wonderful, outgoing people who have a passion for working with and mentoring students.“Harvard’s House system is both unique and has been central to the College’s undergraduate experience since the 1930s,” Hammonds continued. “Rakesh, Doug, and Christie will live up to the traditions of their many predecessors, while bringing new life and ideas to Cabot, Eliot, and Mather Houses. Please join me in welcoming them to each of these House communities.”Professor Rakesh Khurana and Stephanie Khurana (Cabot House)Rakesh Khurana is the Marvin Bower Professor of Leadership Development at the Harvard Business School. He teaches a doctoral seminar on “Management and Markets and the Board of Directors and Corporate Governance” in the M.B.A. program.Khurana received his B.S. from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., and his A.M. in sociology and his Ph.D. in organization behavior from Harvard. Prior to attending graduate school, he worked as a founding member of Cambridge Technology Partners.His research uses a sociological perspective to focus on the processes by which elites and leaders are selected and developed. He has written extensively about the CEO labor market and business education.His wife, Stephanie, is acting executive director for the Tobin Project, an alliance of the nation’s leading academics committed to pursuing transformative ideas that improve the lives of fellow citizens. She previously was co-founder, CEO, and director of Surebridge Inc.She received a B.S. in applied economics from Cornell University, an M.B.A. from the Harvard Business School, and an M.P.P. from the Harvard Kennedy School. She has served on the Cornell Advisory Board for Dean of Students and the President’s Council of Cornell Women. Her career includes receipt of a “Top 40 Under 40” award from the Boston Business Journal. She also serves on the board of Step Into Art, a nonprofit that provides art education for inner-city children.The couple have three children: Sonia (13), Nalini (11), and Jai (7).Professor Douglas Melton and Gail O’Keefe (Eliot House)Douglas Melton is the Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences at Harvard and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He is also a co-director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, and has become a leading researcher and public advocate in stem cell research.He earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Illinois and then went to Cambridge University in England as a Marshall Scholar, where he received a B.A. in history and philosophy of science and a Ph.D. in molecular biology at Trinity College, Cambridge, and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology. He teaches undergraduates, graduate students, and medical students at Harvard in courses ranging from basic developmental biology to bioethics.As an educational consultant, Gail O’Keefe works with parents to help them gain an understanding of the learning issues that their children face, advocating for services, placement assistance, and working to improve parent-child relationships. She also works with EDCO, a voluntary collaborative of 21 urban and suburban school districts serving Greater Boston, to ensure that educational opportunities remain available for children in state custody.O’Keefe earned a B.S. in biology from the University of Connecticut, studied at Tufts University’s Department of Urban and Environmental Policy, and received an M.A. in applied developmental and educational psychology from Boston College.Professor Christie McDonald and Michael Rosengarten (Mather House)Christie McDonald, who grew up in New York City, received her B.A. from Mount Holyoke College (having previously studied for a year in Paris) and her Ph.D. from Yale University. She is the Smith Professor of French Language and Literature and professor of comparative literature in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, where she served as chair from 2000 to 2006. Her research and teaching focus on the dialogue of literature with the social sciences and the arts. Two of her most recent collaborative projects will be published this year, “Rousseau and Freedom” and “French Global: A New Approach to French Literary History.”A native of Montreal, Michael David Rosengarten is associate dean of the Center for Continuing Health Professional Education and associate professor of medicine at McGill University. He earned a bachelor of electrical engineering from McGill before moving to the University of Ottawa, where he received his M.D. degree. Since 1980, Rosengarten has held numerous appointments at McGill and the Montreal General Hospital. A longtime cardiologist specializing in electrophysiology, he combined his medical experience with his computer and Web skills to lead McGill’s continuing medical education in distance learning.The two have spent more than 15 years commuting between Montreal and Cambridge, often meeting at their home in northern Vermont near the Canadian border. They will reside together at Mather House. They have four grown children in Montreal, Seattle, Atlanta, and Lowell, Mass.last_img read more

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Film as social change

first_imgThe power of visual storytelling and the paradigm shift created by both the democratization of filmmaking and the advent of social networking tools brought together academics, movie industry professionals, and budding change agents — demographic groups not accustomed to rubbing elbows — for film screenings and a lively conversation about the possibilities of film as a vehicle for social activism.Sponsored by the Harvard Kennedy School’s Center for Public Leadership, the inaugural Gleitsman Social Change Film Forum (April 16-17) featured screenings of two documentaries from this year’s Sundance Film Festival. “Countdown to Zero” examines the risk of nuclear proliferation, nuclear terrorism, and accidental nuclear exchanges. “A Small Act” describes how an anonymous gift to help educate a boy in Kenya created a ripple effect, with one act of kindness leading to another and then another, in a widening circle of impact.Faculty members from across the University joined in the panel discussions, including: David Ager, codirector of undergraduate studies and lecturer on sociology at the College; Graham Allison, director of the Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Douglas Dillon Professor of Government; Peter Galison, documentary filmmaker and Joseph Pellegrino University Professor of the History of Science and of Physics; David R. Gergen, director of the Center for Public Leadership and Public Service Professor of Public Leadership; Rod Kramer, visiting professor of public policy at Harvard Kennedy School; and Robb Moss, filmmaker and Rudolph Arnheim Lecturer on Filmmaking.Film industry panelists included Lawrence Bender, a three-time Academy Award nominee who produced Al Gore’s “An Inconvenient Truth,” “Inglourious Basterds,” “Pulp Fiction,” and “Good Will Hunting,” as well as Participant Media’s “Countdown to Zero”; Bill Guttentag, who won Oscars for “Twin Towers,” a 2003 documentary about 9/11, and “You Don’t Have to Die,” a 1988 documentary about a boy’s battle against cancer; Diana Barrett, former Harvard Business School professor and founder of The Fledgling Fund, which incorporates innovative uses of media to build social activism campaigns; Patti Lee, producer of “A Small Act”; Diane Weyermann, executive producer of “Countdown to Zero”; Tiffany Shlain, filmmaker and founder of the Webby Awards; Liana Schwarz, senior vice president for social action at Participant Media; and Caroline Libresco, senior programmer at the Sundance Film Festival.“It seems like every young leader wants to be a social change agent,” said Gergen during the open panel on April 16. “And visual imagery is very important to this generation — but they don’t know much about the film industry.”The ensuing conversations touched on a range of topics, including:The changing understanding of what constitutes a film.“Connected,” a film that Shlain is making about systems thinking, will ultimately exist as an 80-minute feature, in a 10-minute version for educators, and in an even shorter version for viral dissemination. “What we’re seeing here is a paradigm shift,” said Barrett. “Tiffany is helping us rethink what we mean by a film.”Brain science and the time-tested ingredients of good storytelling.Advances in neuroscientific understanding have shown that “the brain is more hard-wired for sociability, for engaging with others, and for empathy than we had realized,” said Kramer. “The brain developed as a visual-auditory sensory processing system, which, when you think about it, is what film does.” A film is successful to the degree that it connects to the audience emotionally, said Guttentag. “Story and character are the two most important elements for helping people connect with a film.” Libresco agreed, adding that the elements of good story making include “great characters, each of whose lives has an arc; the layering of multiple stories; beautiful cinematography; and the ability to make audiences cry and laugh.”New technologies for building an audience for a film.When “An Inconvenient Truth” was released in 2006, Twitter didn’t even exist, and Facebook’s potential was just beginning to be understood. Today, these tools enable people to interact immediately with the social issue addressed by a film that moves them. Interactive media also have created “a shift in power,” said Shlain. “As a filmmaker, you can now have direct access to your audience. You don’t have to work through a distributor.”Social change films promote “accelerated crowd learning,” said Barrett, borrowing a phrase from Sarah Palin’s recent address to a Tea Party gathering in Boston. A good film, artfully told, can be a “platform for a more complicated strategy for bringing about social change.”last_img read more

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Men’s basketball releases 2010-11 schedule

first_imgThe Harvard men’s basketball team will play 14 home games at Lavietes Pavilion and face 28 opponents overall, including teams from the Atlantic Coast Conference, Big East, Big Ten, Big XII, Atlantic 10, and the Colonial Athletic Association, in the program’s 100th season.Under head coach Tommy Amaker, who is entering his fourth season with the Crimson, Harvard will look to build on last year’s 21-8 mark, which established a new program record for victories and saw the team compete in the postseason for the first time since 1946.The Crimson will open the upcoming campaign by visiting George Mason on Nov. 13.Read the full story.last_img read more

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Roemer to visit IOP in October

first_imgThe Institute of Politics (IOP), located at Harvard Kennedy School, announced the fall visiting fellowship of Tim Roemer, U.S. ambassador to the Republic of India (2009-11), member of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, and U.S. representative (D-Ind.; 1991-2003).Roemer’s fellowship will occur the week of Oct. 3. Visiting fellows traditionally meet with student groups; lead discussion sessions on topical issues and their experiences in public and political service; and participate in public policy classes with students and Harvard faculty.For more information.last_img read more

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Let the admissions begin

first_imgSeven hundred and seventy-two students have been admitted to the Harvard College Class of 2016 through the Early Action program, which was reinstated this year after a four-year absence.“Their academic, extracurricular, and personal promise are remarkable by any standard, and it will be exciting to follow their progress over the next four years and beyond,” said William R. Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions and financial aid.The Admissions Committee admitted fewer students than in the most recent years of Early Action, when between 813 and 902 were admitted from applicant pools that ranged from 3,869 to 4,214, slightly fewer than this year’s 4,231.“Given increases in our overall applicant numbers over the past few years to nearly 35,000 last year, the Admissions Committee took great care to admit only those we were certain would be admitted in Regular Action,” said Fitzsimmons.The admitted group is more diverse ethnically than any previous early cohort and is comparable with the current freshman class.  Although it is difficult to make precise comparisons to previous years because of changes in federal requirements concerning collecting and reporting race and ethnicity information, 9.6 percent of admitted students this year are African-American, compared with 7.2 percent the last time Harvard had Early Action. There was a similar increase for Latinos (9.9 percent vs. 7.9 percent) and Native Americans and Native Hawaiians (1.7 percent vs. 1 percent), and a slight decrease for Asian Americans (22 percent vs. 23 percent). The current freshman class is 19 percent Asian American, 10 percent African-American, 10.2 percent Latino, and 1.7 percent Native American and Native Hawaiian.It is still too early to determine the socioeconomic composition of the admitted group because many students have not yet submitted financial information.“Preliminary information such as requests for application-fee waivers indicates that there could well be more economic diversity than in previous early cohorts,” said Sarah C. Donahue, director of financial aid.  “We stand ready to help families that require financial assistance, including those that might be interested in a variety of financing options.”Admitted financial aid applicants will be informed of their awards as soon as they complete their forms.  All applicants to Harvard, Early or Regular (Jan. 1 application deadline for March 29 notification) have access to Harvard’s new Net-Price Calculator (NPC), a simple, one-page application available on the NPC website that provides an estimate of a family’s eligibility under Harvard’s generous need-based financial aid program.Families with annual incomes of $65,000 or less and normal assets are no longer required to contribute to their children’s educational expenses.  Those with incomes from $65,000 to $150,000 pay on a sliding scale up to 10 percent of annual income, and there is also need-based aid available to families with incomes greater than $150,000.  Home equity and retirement funds are not considered in the calculations, and students are no longer required to take out loans.  More than 60 percent of Harvard students receive need-based financial aid and receive grants averaging more than $40,000.Applicants were notified of the Admissions Committee’s decisions on Dec. 15.  In addition to the 772 admitted students, 2,838 were deferred and will be considered in the Regular Action process, 546 were denied, 25 withdrew, and 50 were incomplete.  Early Action at Harvard is nonbinding for admitted students, who are free to apply to other institutions and need only reply to Harvard by May 1, the National Common Notification Date.“Admitted students will hear a great deal from us over the months ahead,” said Marlyn McGrath, director of admissions.  Faculty, staff, undergraduate recruiters, and alumni/ae will use phone calls, emails, and regular mailings to reach admitted students with information about Harvard.  Many Harvard clubs will host local parties during the winter holidays and in April.  All admitted students will be invited to Cambridge on April 21-23 for the Visiting Program.“We want our admitted students to be fully informed about Harvard, as they make their decisions about which of the many fine colleges to which they have been admitted provides the best match for them at this important time in their lives,” she added.last_img read more

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Jeffrey Schnapp leads new approach to research in the arts and humanities

first_imgAs revolutionaries go — and he is one, embracing a dynamic new conception of humanistic research in the digital age — Jeffrey Schnapp is really quite grounded. He’s a medievalist, for one thing, a Dante scholar with impeccable credentials and a long track record in all the traditional scholarly forms. And although he founded a collaborative research lab at Harvard to incubate experimental models of knowledge creation and dissemination, he still publishes books, and still uses conventional channels to distribute them.In short, Schnapp, one of the leading theorists of an emerging set of scholarly practices referred to as the digital humanities, doesn’t intend to shock anyone with talk of a book-less, print-less e-future for the academy. Instead, he makes a persuasive case for what he calls a “print-plus” model of inquiry — a model that exploits the power of new analytic and narrative tools, a model in which iterative process, not just outcome, is important, a model in which print is one of many knowledge-sharing media.Schnapp helped pioneer this new way of thinking about humanistic practice as the founder of the influential Humanities Lab at Stanford, where he held the Pierotti Chair of Italian Studies before moving to Harvard in 2011. Now he is the faculty director of metaLAB at Harvard, a new research engine for the arts and humanities that is housed at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, a University-wide initiative. He is also a professor of Romance languages and literatures and of comparative literature, building productive ties with Ph.D. students across FAS disciplines, who are among metaLAB’s co-founders and most active members. And as a cultural historian who has curated art and architecture installations, he is on the teaching faculty at the Graduate School of Design (GSD).last_img read more

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Matthews, Silverman are Scientists of the Year

first_imgThe Harvard Foundation will present the 2012 Scientist of the Year Award to Jessica O. Matthews ’10 and Julia Silverman ’10, co-founders of Uncharted Play Inc. and inventors of SOCCKET, at this year’s annual Albert Einstein Science Conference: Advancing Minorities and Women in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics on March 30. Matthews and Silverman will be honored for their outstanding scientific contributions in creating a soccer ball (also known as SOCCKET) that stores kinetic energy and can then be used to generate electricity to light homes in impoverished areas around the world.Matthews and Silverman founded Uncharted Play Inc. in May 2011 to harness fun in finding solutions to challenges facing our global society. They first conceptualized their trademark invention, the SOCCKET, in 2008 as juniors at Harvard College when they were enrolled in an engineering course. Since then, SOCCKET has garnered extensive awards and praise for its innovative means of creating social change, and Matthews and Silverman have truly demonstrated that play and social activism can go hand in hand.“We are delighted to welcome Ms. Jessica O. Matthews and Ms. Julia Silverman back to Harvard University as our 2012 Scientists of the Year,” said S. Allen Counter, director of the Harvard Foundation. “We honor their outstanding contributions to promoting universal educational opportunities through their company, Uncharted Play Inc., and believe that they will be a great inspiration to both our students here at Harvard and to the visiting students from the local public schools attending our annual science conference.”The Scientist of the Year Honorary Luncheon will be held at noon on March 30 in the Pforzheimer House Hastings Room, where Matthews and Silverman will be presented with the Harvard Foundation Medal for Science. The Harvard Foundation Albert Einstein Science Conference will continue on Saturday, when grade school and high school students from Boston and Cambridge public schools will visit for a day of fun science education, with experiments and lectures conducted by Harvard faculty and students. This “Partners in Science” segment will take place in the Science Center from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Annual Albert Einstein Science Conference is designed to encourage young women and minority students to pursue careers in the academic sciences, and supports the Harvard Foundation’s mission to further promote intercultural and interracial relations.last_img read more

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