Serving up bigger soup sales

first_imgThe New Covent Garden (London) range comprises a choice of nine 2kg soups, available from selected wholesalers and chilled food distributors. In addition to traditional favourites such as carrot & coriander and leek & potato, the company provides seasonal varieties including winter vegetable. New Covent Garden also supports bakeries with a range of point-of-sale material, such as posters and other branded communication materials. Now the company is planning to go one step further by making its first ever five-litre New Covent Garden branded soup kettle available to bakeries. The kettle is currently on trial in dozens of outlets with a national motorway service station chain and the initial results, according to New Covent Garden, are “very encouraging”, with significant sales increases reported.last_img read more

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CSM bakery profits take a hit

first_imgBakery products supplier CSM’s profits have been hit due to pressure to reduce selling prices, according to its first-quarter trading update.Netherlands-based CSM, which owns BakeMark UK, saw volumes in bakery supplies down 3.8% compared to Q1 of 2008, with “the more luxury pastry items particularly affected”.Sales in its Bakery Supplies Europe division stood at €249.2m compared to €264.6m for the comparable 2008 period. EBITDA before exceptionals was €6.3m compared to €12.8m in 2008.The statement released from the company noted that the pressure to reduce selling prices in bakery supplies led to a decrease in return on sales.The company saw overall sales growth of 2.9% for its bakery supplies and lactic acid businesses. Profit before deductions stood at €20.1m, impacted by a decline in volumes of 4.2%.Gerard Hoetmer, chief executive officer at CSM, said the firm is focused on generating cash, which has resulted in a number of cost-cutting initiatives, including the temporary suspension of a number of production lines.last_img read more

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Potawatomi Zoo ready to open on April 2

first_imgIndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Twitter WhatsApp The Potawatomi Zoo is getting ready to open their doors for the season.Get the kids ready to see the animals at the zoo, as they open their doors on April 2. They’ll have regular hours from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day through the end of the season on October 31. They’ll have extended hours for the summer from June 1 to August 31 from 10 to 8.Admission will be $11 for adults, $9 for kids age 3 to 14 and seniors over 62. Potawatomi Zoological Society members are admitted free.Some of the facilities that had to stay closed last year are back this year, there will be some special nights to celebrate the zoo’s 100th anniversary, and there are new animals like sand cats and sloths to see. Pinterest By Tommie Lee – March 23, 2021 0 271 Pinterest Google+ Potawatomi Zoo ready to open on April 2 Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Facebook Google+ Previous articleFederal hunger relief coming to IndianaNext articleIU denying rumors that former Ohio State coach could be next Hoosier basketball coach Tommie Leelast_img read more

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Press release: Mucking in together in Tyneside

first_imgThis is just one of the ways the A19 Coast Road team is re-using or recycling excess material from site in line with Highways England’s Sustainable Development Strategy.Around 250 tonnes of the old road surface has been donated to Benton Quarry Park in Benton and 160 metres of steel fence from the central reservation has been donated to Stephenson Railway Museum in North Shields.General enquiriesMembers of the public should contact the Highways England customer contact centre on 0300 123 5000.Media enquiriesJournalists should contact the Highways England press office on 0844 693 1448 and use the menu to speak to the most appropriate press officer. Around 80,000 cubic meters of soil, that’s enough to fill 32 Olympic sized swimming pools, is being reused to help form the embankments on a nearby scheme.By reusing this material it will benefit both schemes by reducing vehicle movements and costs. Transporting the soil will involve more than 10,000 lorry movements totalling over 60,000 miles.The A19 Coast Road scheme is digging deep to remove the earth to form an underpass, creating the first triple decker roundabout in the North East.As the soil is removed it will be transported to a site in Wardley where it will be stored to create the embankments for the A19 Testos scheme.Highways England’s project manager for the A19 Testos scheme Paul Ahdal said: This is just one of the many examples where Highways England is re-using materials which will not only reduce costs but also provide environmental benefits for both schemes. Both of the schemes will provide smoother journeys for drivers along the A19 as they will no longer needing to negotiate the roundabouts. Work on the A19 Coast Road involves digging out an underpass and the A19 Testos involves creating a flyover structure over the roundabout. The excess soil will be used to form the embankments for the Testos scheme which is due to start in 2019 in the same year Coast Road is due to be completed.last_img read more

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J.E.D.I. With Members of SCI, Disco Biscuits, Break Science, More To Play Late-Night During Jazz Fest

first_imgJ.E.D.I. (Jazz Electronic Dance Improvised) has announced a stacked lineup for its second-annual late-night show during Jazz Fest in New Orleans. The group will blend a myriad of musical elements from a diverse range of genres including jazz, afrobeat, dub, funk, dance and more to create a “live music abstraction” at One Eyed Jacks on Friday, May 3rd at 2:00 AM.J.E.D.I, led by Brazilian Girls co-founder, former David Byrne drummer, and Grammy nominee Aaron Johnston, has brought together a lineup featuring a dual bass attack of Marc Brownstein (The Disco Biscuits) and Nate Edgar (The Nth Power), versatile turntablist DJ Logic, and keyboardist Borahm Lee (Break Science/Pretty Lights Live). Revered mandolinist/violinist Michael Kang and percussionist Jason Hann of The String Cheese Incident will be on hand as special guests after finishing up night two of their three-night run at Mardi Gras World.For Johnston, J.E.D.I. has been a long-time dream that is finally coming into fruition. His diverse musical background and long list of friends and prior collaborators have led to many special nights in J.E.D.I.’s young career. Last year’s performance at Jazz Fest, for example, featured special guest appearances by guitarist Jefferey Lockhart, as well as the entire percussion section from the David Byrne touring band, alongside Jazz Fest staples Eddie Roberts of The New Mastersounds and Ryan Zoidis of Lettuce. The band also has a high-profile show coming up in Denver at the new event, The Big Melt, featuring members of The String Cheese Incident, Thievery Corporation, and more.When asked about J.E.D.I., Johnston explained, “It’s for us and the crowd. An opportunity for us to connect on stage with our friends—who we are fortunate enough to have some of the top musicians around today—and play the music we want to play and experiment with and hopefully really connect with the crowd.”Tickets to J.E.D.I at One Eyed Jacks are on sale NOW at this link. For full show information, as well as poster art by artist Chris Bertetta, see below.Date: Friday, May 3rd, 2019 (Technically early morning 5/4)Show: J.E.D.I. (Jazz Electronic Dance Improvised) feat. Aaron Johnston (Brazilian Girls), Marc Brownstein (The Disco Biscuits), Nate Edgar (The Nth Power), Borahm Lee (Break Science / Pretty Lights Live), and DJ Logic with special guests Michael Kang and Jason Hann (The String Cheese Incident)Venue: One Eyed Jacks – 615 Toulouse Street – New Orleans, LADoors: 1:30 AM / Show: 2:00amTICKETS: $30 Advance / $35 Day Of Showlast_img read more

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Matthews, Silverman are Scientists of the Year

first_imgThe Harvard Foundation will present the 2012 Scientist of the Year Award to Jessica O. Matthews ’10 and Julia Silverman ’10, co-founders of Uncharted Play Inc. and inventors of SOCCKET, at this year’s annual Albert Einstein Science Conference: Advancing Minorities and Women in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics on March 30. Matthews and Silverman will be honored for their outstanding scientific contributions in creating a soccer ball (also known as SOCCKET) that stores kinetic energy and can then be used to generate electricity to light homes in impoverished areas around the world.Matthews and Silverman founded Uncharted Play Inc. in May 2011 to harness fun in finding solutions to challenges facing our global society. They first conceptualized their trademark invention, the SOCCKET, in 2008 as juniors at Harvard College when they were enrolled in an engineering course. Since then, SOCCKET has garnered extensive awards and praise for its innovative means of creating social change, and Matthews and Silverman have truly demonstrated that play and social activism can go hand in hand.“We are delighted to welcome Ms. Jessica O. Matthews and Ms. Julia Silverman back to Harvard University as our 2012 Scientists of the Year,” said S. Allen Counter, director of the Harvard Foundation. “We honor their outstanding contributions to promoting universal educational opportunities through their company, Uncharted Play Inc., and believe that they will be a great inspiration to both our students here at Harvard and to the visiting students from the local public schools attending our annual science conference.”The Scientist of the Year Honorary Luncheon will be held at noon on March 30 in the Pforzheimer House Hastings Room, where Matthews and Silverman will be presented with the Harvard Foundation Medal for Science. The Harvard Foundation Albert Einstein Science Conference will continue on Saturday, when grade school and high school students from Boston and Cambridge public schools will visit for a day of fun science education, with experiments and lectures conducted by Harvard faculty and students. This “Partners in Science” segment will take place in the Science Center from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Annual Albert Einstein Science Conference is designed to encourage young women and minority students to pursue careers in the academic sciences, and supports the Harvard Foundation’s mission to further promote intercultural and interracial relations.last_img read more

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Theater group brings ‘Cymbeline’ to the stage

first_imgFaked deaths. Real deaths. An evil stepmother. Conspiracies. Betrayal. Love. Ghosts. A god. You can catch all of these elements at the Not-So-Royal (NSR) Shakespeare Company’s production of “Cymbeline,” which is running from Thursday to Saturday.“I think it’s one of the most intense plots Shakespeare ever wrote … I like to think of it as Shakespeare’s fairytale,” junior Mary Elsa Henrichs, who is directing the play, said. “It’s got a lot of those elements. There’s a wicked stepmother, a princess who runs away in disguise and kidnapped princes. There’s also decapitation and a war between Britain and Rome … so there’s a lot of elements going on.” Henrichs described the play as “genre-breaking,” and said it takes elements from tragedies, comedies and romances. NSR is a unique Shakespeare troupe as it is entirely student run — from the production design to directing to marketing, the students are at the reigns of the project. “I think it’s really special and amazing that we have this club on campus, because I think it’s one thing to encounter a text of Shakespeare in a class, and that can be really wonderful and beneficial, but I really believe they were written to be performed and written to be seen,” Henrichs said. “To be able to bring plays, one a semester, to the Notre Dame campus community so that we can experience Shakespeare in the fashion that he wrote for, rather than just reading it on a page or even SparkNoting it, is really great.”Henrichs is a veteran of acting in Shakespeare plays and said “Cymbeline” is one of the reasons she fell in love with Shakespeare’s works. “I’ve been in 15 of Shakespeare’s plays, and this was the one where I think I fell in love with acting,” she said. “ … It’s just such a wild plot for actors to be spinning together. So I think it offers a lot to its actors and its creators. It’s a show that everyone has to work together to bring together.”Henrichs said there is also value in producing a lesser-known play.“I think there’s a lot of pressure to be haughty for some prestigious play, but we are the Not-So-Royal Shakespeare Company, so we’re able to take on these pieces and bring a cool life to them,” she said.Junior Ellis Sargeant is acting in a production of “Cymbeline” for a second time after first acting in it in high school. This time he is taking on the role of Posthumus Leonatus, a character whom Sargeant said he can relate to, although the character does go through some things that most people will not, such as ordering the murder of his wife. “One of the reasons I was really drawn to the role is that, although murder is a bit much and it’s about royal figures in life and death, the actual things that he’s going through is stuff that I can actually relate to, like heartbreak and betrayal,” Sargeant said. Sargeant said “Cymbeline” is an interesting play to perform, because Shakespeare incorporates many of the typical fairytale archetypes that we know of today, even before most of those typical fairytales were written. “You have these fairytale elements,” he said. “ … There’s the evil potion given by an evil stepmother. It’s following all of these tropes and predates all the Disney movies that we’re familiar with. Despite being a very little known play, it actually shows up a lot in our cultural consciousness. We understand the archetypes of the characters that are in it. We know what it’s like to have the virtuous heroine. We know what it’s like to have the fallen hero. We know what it’s like to have the trickster, the evil stepmother or the blind king.”This particular production of “Cymbeline” uses key props to both set the stage of the play and as plot devices. A couple of these, according to Henrichs and Sargeant, are a trunk and a vial of something that may or may not be poison. “We consistently throughout the play are pulling things out of the trunk and building the world around us. We even build the theater around the audience in order to start the show and expose just a little bit of the artifice in order to bring people into the story,” Sargeant said.Sophomore Isobel Grogan, who is playing Cymbeline’s daughter Innogen, said “Cymbeline” has many of  the qualities that Shakespeare is known for including in his works.“If you had to pick one play of Shakespeare’s that perfectly encapsulates all of his tropes and his weirdness and his issues and his strengths, I think ‘Cymbeline’ is the best one. It’s got a lot of moving parts,” Grogan said. Grogan said each character has a specific prop throughout the play, which works towards their goal in stripping the play of many of it’s more complicated frills in order to simplify it for the audience. “We’re playing with the idea of everybody having one emblematic prop that defines their character. [We are] taking away as many frills as possible to get down to the base of the story and let that speak for itself,” Grogan said. Sargeant said the beauty of performing this fairytale-esque play instead of something more realistic or relatable is grounded in our ever-present storytelling as a society and as people. “We constantly tell stories about ourselves,” he said. “There is not an aspect of our lives that we don’t tell in the form of a story. No one can actually condense themselves down to something that’s able to be given to another person without a story, without a narrative. You always pick and choose which details you’re telling … and bring[ing] the audience into them rather than hiding them I think is a good way to have people look at it in a way that’s different from how it’s normally done.”Tags: cymbeline, Not-So-Royal Shakespeare Company, NSRlast_img read more

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Natalie Portman: Hometown Heroine

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Long Island’s own Natalie Portman stars in the upcoming superhero film “Thor.”She’s played a ballerina, a queen, a stripper and two famous Annes (Frank and Boleyn). She was named one of the 50 Most Beautiful People by People Magazine. She won the Academy Award for her performance in the psychological thriller Black Swan, along with a Golden Globe and several other major accolades.Yet during one of her nearly 20 David Letterman Show appearances, Natalie Portman told the host, “I’ll always still be a kid from Long Island.”Portman, who was born in Jerusalem and lived there until age 3, spent most of her formative years in Jericho, attending Solomon Schechter Day School in Glen Cove, and graduating in 1999 from Syosset High School, where she was valedictorian and also voted “Most Likely to Win Jeopardy.”“Natalie was brilliant in every subject,” says Jill Goldberg, her guidance counselor at Syosset High School when the actress was still known by her given name, Natalie Hershlag (Portman is her grandmother’s maiden name). “She balanced her work here with her professional life seamlessly, maintaining a flawless average. She’s just a brilliant, remarkable person, inside and out. I absolutely adore her.”Portman studied ballet and modern dance at the American Theater Dance Workshop in New Hyde Park and attended the Usdan Center for the Creative and Performing Arts in Wheatley Heights. Her road to stardom began at age 10, when she was “discovered” at an LI pizza parlor by a Revlon scout looking for child models.By age 12, Portman was cast in her first film, Leon: The Professional. Roles followed in Heat (1995), Beautiful Girls (1996) and Mars Attacks! (1996). But despite her busy career, academics always came first—a value instilled by her parents, Dr. Avner Hershlag, chief of North Shore-LIJ’s Center for Human Reproduction, and Shelley Hershlag, an artist.“Natalie’s parents didn’t let her work on major films during the school year,” says Goldberg. “They valued education very highly.”They made an exception for Portman’s starring role on Broadway in The Diary of Anne Frank during her high school junior year. Natalie’s grandfather’s parents and his younger brother were killed in concentration camps, making it extremely personal.Promoting the play on the Today Show in 1997, she told Matt Lauer, “I read the diary at 12, and it’s very close to my own family history. It’s very important to remind people of the wrongs of racism and hatred.”During her senior year, Portman reached superstardom as Queen Amidala in Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace, famously missing its premiere to study for finals.Her studiousness paid off. Portman graduated with a 4.0 average from Syosset High and continued her education at Harvard, majoring in psychology. At the time, Portman said, “I don’t care if [college] ruins my career. I’d rather be smart than a movie star.”The actress lived for a time in Sea Cliff, where longtime resident and Bart’s Barber Shop owner Joseph Mazzeo once cut her hair. “She came in with her mom, and I had no idea who she was,” Mazzeo recalls. “She was growing her hair out, and she said, ‘Give me a Mohawk.’” He later learned that she’d shaved her head for a movie roll. “Her mom looked nervous,” Mazzeo says, “but Natalie told me, ‘I bet you think I’m 14, but I’m 24.’”Portman, now 32, reprises her role as astrophysicist Jane Foster in Marvel’s Thor: The Dark World, debuting this month—and her science cred isn’t fiction. In high school, Portman co-authored a paper titled “A Simple Method to Demonstrate the Enzymatic Production of Hydrogen from Sugar,” which earned her semifinalist honors in the prestigious Intel Science Talent Search. She continued her distinguished science career at Harvard, contributing to a study on memory called “Frontal Lobe Activation during Object Permanence.”She may still be “just a kid from Long Island,” but with her brains, beauty and killer-acting chops, she’s done LI proud.last_img read more

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Huntington Station Teen Nabbed for Carjacking Try

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A teenager armed with a hammer was arrested for allegedly trying to carjack a driver, who instead ran away from the suspect in Huntington on Wednesday afternoon, Suffolk County police saidThomas Rivas was charged with attempted robbery and criminal possession of a weapon.Police said the 19-year-old Huntington Station man was armed with a roofing hammer when he ordered the victim to hand over his wallet and keys while the victim was retrieving an item out of his trunk at the Waldbaum’s parking lot on Wall Street at 2 p.m.The victim told Rivas he had no money and ran away before calling 911 and giving police the suspect’s description, police said.Rivas, who did not give chase, was apprehended shortly later in front of the nearby Southdown Market, police said.He will be arraigned Thursday at First District Court in Central Islip.last_img read more

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Livingstone: London needs 15 new towers by 2011

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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