UK: Employees from BMT Defence Services, BMT ARGOSS to Embark on Challenging Journey

first_img View post tag: ARGOSS View post tag: Embark View post tag: BMT View post tag: Naval Back to overview,Home naval-today UK: Employees from BMT Defence Services, BMT ARGOSS to Embark on Challenging Journey View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Navy View post tag: services Training & Education View post tag: Defence Two employees from BMT Defence Services and BMT ARGOSS, subsidiaries of BMT Group Ltd, are set to embark on a challenging journey which will see them make an epic motorcycle ride from Bath, UK to Gdansk in Poland.With the trip fully funded by the two riders, all donations and sponsorship raised will go directly to two local care centres for premature and ill babies – the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Bath and Polskie Stowarzyszenie na Rzecz Osob z Uposledzeniem (PSOUU), The Polish Association for Persons with Mental Disability in Gdansk.Covering a staggering 2,500 miles, both Ian Fraser, Director at BMT ARGOSS and Brian Welsh, Principal Electrical Engineer at BMT Defence Services will begin their journey on 17th August 2012 and look to finish their ride the following Sunday 26th August.  The route will take them through Belgium, Holland, Germany and finally into Poland experiencing all sorts of demanding weather and road conditions. Ian Fraser comments: “Inspiration for this trip came from my three year old son who had to spend a week in the NICU following his birth.  Despite undertaking many motorcycle trips around Europe on a variety of machines, I am excited to take up this new challenge and raise as much money as possible for the two organisations.”The NICU in Bath combines advanced technology and trained healthcare professionals to provide specialised care for new born babies. The PSOUU in Gdansk provides equalisation of opportunity for people with mental disability by providing parental support through to creation of opportunities for people with mental disability and their families.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, August 14, 2012; Image: BMT August 14, 2012 View post tag: Challenging UK: Employees from BMT Defence Services, BMT ARGOSS to Embark on Challenging Journey Share this article View post tag: Journey View post tag: employeeslast_img read more

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OULC introduce gender-balanced electoral college

first_imgThe motion was also criticised for giving women an unfair advantage in the democratic process. Alastair Holder-Ross, a member of the OULC, said, “I think it’s incredibly important to promote women’s roles within the club and support Helena Dollimore especially in all she has done to that end. However, I think sacrificing fundamental democratic principles is not the best way to serve the cause of gender equality. The amendment does not deal with the causes of the gender imbalance within the club, even if its intentions are noble.”Rebecca Grant, OULC Women’s Officer who proposed the motion, said, “It does indeed give women a disproportionate advantage – this is the aim of the motion. The turnout of women is a sustained and serious problem which needs to be tackled. One of the best things about the motion is that it adapts as its aims are fulfilled; if more women are encouraged to attend meetings, the relative weight of each vote will go down.“We have to remember that men have always had, and continue to have, a ‘disproportionate advantage’, and positive and decisive action is needed to redress the balance. It seems odd to be worried about privileging women when women make up less than 20% of the Labour club executive, on average.”The amendment was passed in a Constitutional Convention on the 6th constitution. OULC were required to reform their constitution after a decision was made by the University Proctors to set a standard for all university-affiliated societies. This raised concerns about how the amendment was to be repealed and whether it needed to be passed on two separate occasions.Other criticism included the fact that the email detailing the Electoral College motion was sent only 2 1⁄2 hours before the meeting. In response, Grant claimed, “The circulation of the motion prior to the meeting was entirely in line with constitutional requirements. Some other constitutional amendments, such as proxy voting, were introduced and passed at the meeting with no notice at all given beforehand.”Nick Hilton, a member of the OULC, commented to Cherwell, “Imposing a uniform constitution on Oxford University societies and clubs has worrying implications for their autonomy. The new OULC constitution has been rushed through in order to meet a deadline, mainly so that we can retain the ‘U’ in our name and get a discount on our Fresher’s Fair stall. The proctors are trying to avoid societies embarrassing the University, to which they are affiliated, and, by doing so, control their operations. I think this is a significant and deliberate overreach of their authority.”A University spokesperson said, “Clubs registered with the Proctors are required to follow the rules laid out in the constitution. This is the implementation of a decision of the Rules Committee which took effect from October 2013 with an academic year’s grace period for existing clubs. The Proctors’ Office is happy to advise individual clubs on specific issues as necessary and to listen to feedback on the constitution. A review of the general oversight of clubs has been agreed and will commence shortly.” The Oxford University Labour Club (OULC) has passed a constitutional amendment introducing gender-balanced electoral colleges that allocate 50% of the voting power in executive elections to people who do not self-identify as men.In Termly General Meetings, when the executive committee is elected, voters are now divided into two electoral colleges: those who self-identify as men and those who do not.Each electoral college receives equal weight when voting. Anna Coombes, Women’s Officer Elect for OULC, said, “The motion passed with considerable support, with only one vote in opposition and two abstentions. The main concern raised at the meeting was concerning one person, one vote.“However, the policy does not act to remove this, as each voter still casts only one vote. The idea of the policy is that the women’s voice within the group carries the same weight as the men’s. This does indeed mean giving women an advantage, but we (women in attendance of the Women’s Working Group where the motion was first discussed) felt that such action was necessary in order to address the considerable imbalance that currently prevails within the club.“Considering that women make up over half of OULC’s membership it is undemocratic and unacceptable that women consistently make up such a small proportion of the executive.“Looking at this, there is no doubt that there is a problem of womens’ turnout within OULC. This is not due to a lack of trying; the motion was proposed as a last resort after many other initiatives have been tried.”Representation of women on the OULC executive committee averages at below 20%. In Hilary Term a Women’s Working Group was set up in order to devise measures to tackle the low levels of participation and representation of women in OULC. One student pointed out that, judging by past turnout to Termly General Meetings, women could have 5 times the voting power of the men present.last_img read more

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Crowded Ballot Includes Balanced Budget Amendment

first_imgNovember 6, 2018By Eddie DrewsTheStatehouseFile.comINDIANAPOLIS—The race for the U.S. Senate may be dominating most election coverage, but Hoosiers will have a proposed state constitutional amendment to consider as well as candidates for other federal and state offices when they vote Tuesday.That constitutional amendment, which calls for a balanced budget, is either necessary for Indiana’s fiscal health or a waste of resources because the constitution already prohibits the state from going into debt.The proposed balanced budget amendment—which calls for the state to spend no more money than it takes in—passed the Indiana General Assembly twice, in 2015 and 2017. .Gov. Eric Holcomb, through his campaign committee, is encouraging a yes vote on the measure. It would take a two-thirds vote in both chambers to suspend the balanced budget requirement under the proposed amendment.But Rep. Ed DeLaney, D-Indianapolis, said the amendment is useless and will change nothing because lawmakers already pass balanced budgets. He said the amendment was created by Republicans to create an image that they are responsible and Democrats are not.“It has no practical impact,” said DeLaney, adding “all it does is create confusion for the voters.”Also on the ballot this year are all nine seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, three statewide offices, all 100 seats in the Indiana House and 25 in the Senate, local two statewide judicial positions, local races for judges and prosecuting attorneys, plus numerous local offices ranging from school board to township trustee. Some local jurisdictions have ballot issues as well.At the statewide level, Hoosiers have three options for secretary of state: incumbent Republican Connie Lawson, Democratic challenger Jim Harper and Libertarian challenger Mark Rutherford.In the race for Treasurer are Republican incumbent Kelly Mitchell and Democratic challenger John Aguilera. And for Auditor, voters have three options as well with Republican incumbent Tera Klutz, Democratic challenger Joselyn Whitticker and Libertarian challenger John Schick.Judge Robert Alice of the Indiana Court of Appeals and state Supreme Court Justice Geoffrey Slaughter face the voters in a yes or no judicial retention vote. Both were appointed by former Gov. Mike Pence. Hoosiers can find their polling location, whether they are registered and other information about what’s on the ballot here.Eddie Drews is a reporter for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Ocean City Intermediate School Awarded Sustainable Jersey for Schools Grant

first_imgOcean City Intermediate School Awarded Sustainable Jersey for Schools Grant to Fund ‘Promoting Student Health and Wellness by Ensuring Access to Healthy Drinking Water Throughout the School Day’Sustainable Jersey for Schools representatives announced that Ocean City Intermediate School has been awarded a Sustainable Jersey for Schools Small Grant. Ocean City Intermediate School is one of 30 schools in New Jersey to receive a Sustainable Jersey for Schools Small Grant funded by the New Jersey Department of Health in this funding cycle.  “We are extremely excited about receiving this grant.  It will help us to continue our message of sustainability and conservation that began with our edible garden grants and continued with our sustainability grant last year,” explains the Ocean City Intermediate School Principal, Geoff Haines. “We look forward to continuing to educate the OCIS family about conservation and staying healthy.”  The Ocean City Intermediate School will use this year’s grant money to pursue a project that will ensure access to healthy drinking water for all students. The school plans to purchase and install three water bottle filling stations in locations easily accessible to students, staff and visitors. The stations have built-in water filtration in order to replace the old, existing water fountains.  The grant proposal was written up by the ‘OCIS Green Team,’ which is constantly working on new ideas to advance the school’s resources and ability to conserve. The health and science teachers are excited to incorporate the water stations into their lesson plans, as well as the prospect of guest lecturers. Superintendent Dr. Kathleen Taylor was thrilled to hear about the grant, sharing how, “the District is always looking for ways to improve the health of our students and the impact our schools have on the community. This grant is one more step forward in our initiative!” Currently, 207 districts and 516 schools have registered to work toward Sustainable Jersey for Schools certification. “Sustainable schools are healthy schools, and schools that promote health and well-being will see benefits,” said Donna Drewes, who co-directs Sustainable Jersey with Randall Solomon. “These grants funded by the New Jersey Department of Health will support schools as they tackle important health and wellness actions.” The New Jersey Department of Health is funding the grants through its Maternal and Child Health Services Title V Block Grant. Technical assistance to grant recipients will be provided by three of the Department of Health’s regional partners: AtlantiCare (south), EmPoWER Somerset (central) and The Center for Prevention and Counseling (north). About The Ocean City Intermediate SchoolThe Ocean City Intermediate School (OCIS) is made up of students in grades four, five, six, seven, and eight who reside in Ocean City and Sea Isle City, along with students that are part of the School Choice Program. Like the district, OCIS is “committed to excellence.” The school is supported by a community that recognizes the effort to focus upon what is best for all of the students in Ocean City. OCIS has enjoyed a rich history of academic and co-curricular excellence that is a result of the hard work and partnership between our staff, the community, and our parents/guardians. Our educators are focused on respect, hard work, dynamic lessons and modeling that align with their curriculum under the New Jersey Student Learning Standards.About Sustainable Jersey for SchoolsSustainable Jersey for Schools is a certification program for public schools in New Jersey. It was launched by Sustainable Jersey, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that provides tools, training and financial incentives to support and reward municipalities and schools as they pursue sustainability programs. Currently, 207 school districts and 516 schools in New Jersey are participating in the program.Sustainable Jersey for Schools is underwritten by the New Jersey School Boards Association (NJSBA), the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities Clean Energy Program, The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation and the New Jersey Education Association (NJEA). The 2016 Sustainable Jersey for Schools small grants program is funded by the PSEG Foundation, NJEA, the Gardinier Environmental Fund and the New Jersey Department of Health. Founding Sponsor contributors are South Jersey Gas, New Jersey Natural Gas and NJM Insurance Group. Bayer Foundation is a Silver Sponsor and Jersey Central Power and Light and Spiezle Architectural Group are Bronze Sponsors.Sustainable Jersey for Schools Program partners include: New Jersey School Boards Association (NJSBA), New Jersey Education Association (NJEA), New Jersey Association of School Administrators (NJASA), New Jersey Association of School Business Officials (NJASBO), New Jersey Parent Teacher Association (NJPTA), New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA), New Jersey School Buildings and Grounds Association (NJSBGA) and The Sustainability Institute at The College of New Jersey (TCNJ.)Website:          www.SustainableJerseySchools.comTwitter:            www.twitter.com/SJ_SchoolsFacebook:       www.facebook.com/SustainableJerseyInstagram:       https://instagram.com/sustainable_jersey/Linked In:        www.linkedin.com/company/sustainable-jersey The Ocean City Intermediate School just participated in the “Kindness Challenge.”last_img read more

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Men’s basketball releases 2010-11 schedule

first_imgThe Harvard men’s basketball team will play 14 home games at Lavietes Pavilion and face 28 opponents overall, including teams from the Atlantic Coast Conference, Big East, Big Ten, Big XII, Atlantic 10, and the Colonial Athletic Association, in the program’s 100th season.Under head coach Tommy Amaker, who is entering his fourth season with the Crimson, Harvard will look to build on last year’s 21-8 mark, which established a new program record for victories and saw the team compete in the postseason for the first time since 1946.The Crimson will open the upcoming campaign by visiting George Mason on Nov. 13.Read the full story.last_img read more

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Let the admissions begin

first_imgSeven hundred and seventy-two students have been admitted to the Harvard College Class of 2016 through the Early Action program, which was reinstated this year after a four-year absence.“Their academic, extracurricular, and personal promise are remarkable by any standard, and it will be exciting to follow their progress over the next four years and beyond,” said William R. Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions and financial aid.The Admissions Committee admitted fewer students than in the most recent years of Early Action, when between 813 and 902 were admitted from applicant pools that ranged from 3,869 to 4,214, slightly fewer than this year’s 4,231.“Given increases in our overall applicant numbers over the past few years to nearly 35,000 last year, the Admissions Committee took great care to admit only those we were certain would be admitted in Regular Action,” said Fitzsimmons.The admitted group is more diverse ethnically than any previous early cohort and is comparable with the current freshman class.  Although it is difficult to make precise comparisons to previous years because of changes in federal requirements concerning collecting and reporting race and ethnicity information, 9.6 percent of admitted students this year are African-American, compared with 7.2 percent the last time Harvard had Early Action. There was a similar increase for Latinos (9.9 percent vs. 7.9 percent) and Native Americans and Native Hawaiians (1.7 percent vs. 1 percent), and a slight decrease for Asian Americans (22 percent vs. 23 percent). The current freshman class is 19 percent Asian American, 10 percent African-American, 10.2 percent Latino, and 1.7 percent Native American and Native Hawaiian.It is still too early to determine the socioeconomic composition of the admitted group because many students have not yet submitted financial information.“Preliminary information such as requests for application-fee waivers indicates that there could well be more economic diversity than in previous early cohorts,” said Sarah C. Donahue, director of financial aid.  “We stand ready to help families that require financial assistance, including those that might be interested in a variety of financing options.”Admitted financial aid applicants will be informed of their awards as soon as they complete their forms.  All applicants to Harvard, Early or Regular (Jan. 1 application deadline for March 29 notification) have access to Harvard’s new Net-Price Calculator (NPC), a simple, one-page application available on the NPC website that provides an estimate of a family’s eligibility under Harvard’s generous need-based financial aid program.Families with annual incomes of $65,000 or less and normal assets are no longer required to contribute to their children’s educational expenses.  Those with incomes from $65,000 to $150,000 pay on a sliding scale up to 10 percent of annual income, and there is also need-based aid available to families with incomes greater than $150,000.  Home equity and retirement funds are not considered in the calculations, and students are no longer required to take out loans.  More than 60 percent of Harvard students receive need-based financial aid and receive grants averaging more than $40,000.Applicants were notified of the Admissions Committee’s decisions on Dec. 15.  In addition to the 772 admitted students, 2,838 were deferred and will be considered in the Regular Action process, 546 were denied, 25 withdrew, and 50 were incomplete.  Early Action at Harvard is nonbinding for admitted students, who are free to apply to other institutions and need only reply to Harvard by May 1, the National Common Notification Date.“Admitted students will hear a great deal from us over the months ahead,” said Marlyn McGrath, director of admissions.  Faculty, staff, undergraduate recruiters, and alumni/ae will use phone calls, emails, and regular mailings to reach admitted students with information about Harvard.  Many Harvard clubs will host local parties during the winter holidays and in April.  All admitted students will be invited to Cambridge on April 21-23 for the Visiting Program.“We want our admitted students to be fully informed about Harvard, as they make their decisions about which of the many fine colleges to which they have been admitted provides the best match for them at this important time in their lives,” she added.last_img read more

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Rebuilding health care in Nepal

first_imgFollowing last year’s devastating earthquake, a student commits to improving health care in his native countryWhen Ramu Kharel, M.P.H. ’16, was seven years old, his father won the lottery for an immigrant visa to become a permanent resident of the United States. That serendipity ultimately brought Kharel from a small village in Nepal to America, to medical school in Texas, and ultimately to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health to learn the skills he is now using to improve health care delivery back in his native Nepal.Currently enrolled at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Kharel took a break after his third year to study global health at Harvard Chan School. His awakening to issues of public health came during the year he spent in India as an undergraduate, when he worked in impoverished neighborhoods with a Muslim women’s rights organization. Among other health issues, Kharel witnessed a lack of basic hygiene and heavy smoking among the residents and realized there was more to being a doctor than just treating individuals; some of these problems needed to be addressed at the population level.When it came time to choose his medical specialty, he decided on obstetrics and gynecology because he had enjoyed that rotation in medical school and because of his work with women in India. After Nepal suffered a devastating earthquake in 2015, however, he now plans to specialize in emergency medicine, with a focus on disaster preparedness and disaster management. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Medical professionals encourage passage of vaccine bills

first_img Read Full Story A letter signed by 130 faculty members, postdocs, students and staff members of Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health urged Massachusetts lawmakers to pass proposed legislation aimed at tightening restrictions for vaccine exemptions in order to improve vaccination rates among children and ensure community protection throughout the state.The letter was spearheaded by Michael Mina, assistant professor of epidemiology, as well as members of the School’s Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics, and was submitted as testimony in support of two bills.The letter’s primary objective was to emphasize the importance of vaccines in preventing or diminishing potentially deadly infectious disease, according to Mina. It noted that vaccines are currently the “safest and most effective way to protect ourselves and children against infectious diseases.”In addition, because the bills were proposed in response to growing vaccine hesitancy resulting in large part from vaccine misinformation, the letter also noted that there is no scientific evidence that any vaccines cause autism or other long-term side effects, nor is there any support for delaying vaccine schedules.The letter emphasized that ensuring the highest possible vaccination rate is key to achieving community protection. “When vaccination rates decline, community immunity is lost, leading to outbreaks of diseases. This places our most vulnerable members of society including young children, elderly, and pregnant women, among others, at unnecessarily high risk for disease,” the letter said.Additionally, Mina and Carmen Messerlian, assistant professor of environmental reproductive, perinatal and pediatric epidemiology, submitted in-person testimony at the Massachusetts State House on Dec. 3, 2019, urging lawmakers to pass the bills. The testimony highlighted the growing threat of measles worldwide, including the risk of “immunological amnesia” — when measles wipes out the immune system’s memory of previous illnesses, making those who recover susceptible to infections they may have been protected from before contracting the virus. Mina and Messerlian also noted that the effects of climate change and exposure to environmental pollutants weaken the immune system and decrease vaccine efficacy in young children, respectively.“As a society and as a state, we must respond to, adapt, and prepare for these changes,” Messerlian’s testimony said.last_img read more

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Letter to the Editor: We can’t wait: Now is the time to support our local businesses

first_imgRocky Mountains 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr To the Editor:I’m writing today to advocate for quick action on behalf of the heroes of our American economy, small and local businesses. As the President & CEO of Canvas Credit Union, we serve over 4,000 business members across Colorado. We exist to serve our members and right now these organizations are experiencing acute frustration and pain. As has been well publicized, the Small Business Administration’s Paycheck Protection Program’s (aka the PPP Loan) funding was exhausted yesterday.I’m one person seeing the pain of many. In this unprecedented time, there are many things we cannot control. What we can control is how we respond. Now is the time to respond and to respond quickly.Even before this funding issue arose, our credit union was not able to serve our business members through this program. To give a bit of background, as part of the CARES Act, the U.S. Government allocated $349,000,000,000 of stimulus funds for businesses with up to 500 employees to help soften the economic impacts of COVID-19. I believe that our leaders created this program to help the backbone of our economy, our small business owners. The execution of that program has been challenging for some financial institutions including Canvas, but most importantly for business owners and their employees.As the bill was drafted, and ultimately enacted into law, the government appointed the financial institutions of the U.S. to act as their agents to receive and process applications and disburse funds for PPP Loans. The first set of draft rules for this program were published just hours before the SBA began directing businesses to apply with banks and credit unions, unfortunately putting financial institutions like Canvas in a spot where we lacked necessary information. Small businesses were directed by the SBA to begin applying for loans at credit unions and community banks, even though those institutions didn’t have access to the critical information and systems they needed to be able to process these loans. For example, Canvas only received access to the SBA’s online portal this week, just before funding for the program ran out, and the SBA has still not issued a final rule or all of the necessary details on how these loans will be closed and funded. As we move forward, ensuring the SBA can handle the volume of requests will be critical.There are moments in life when patience matters. This is not that time. I want to encourage our leaders in Congress and at the Small Business Administration to be impatient and act expediently. This is not about loans. It’s about caring for the employees of these businesses. It’s about putting food on their tables. It’s about these owners living up to their promises they’ve made to their customers. It’s about seeing the American dream flourish. We need to not only listen, but act.Credit unions are the first responders of financial services. We are ready to stand with the businesses we serve. We need funding and the guidance to put our support in motion through the PPP. We can’t do that alone and I’m calling for the leaders of our country to demand action.In a time when so much is uncertain, we can act to bring peace of mind. We can provide more support and stand with those that have made our communities great. At Canvas, we will not stop working to find ways to support our business community. Serving Colorado small businesses is what we are all about. Until we have answers and new funding, we are offering other options including loan payment deferments for our business members.To our more than 4,000 business members, we stand with you. You matter. We hear you. We won’t stop working to serve you.To members of Congress and the Small Business Administration, please stand with me and with so many business owners and their employees. Show your impatience for solutions that matter and act now. I am optimistic that the spirit of this great country to take extraordinary action in the face of challenge will inspire us in this moment to work together.As I always say, the best is yet to come.Be well,Todd MarksberryPresident/CEO, Canvas Credit UnionAbout Canvas Credit Union (http://canvas.org):Canvas Credit Union (Formerly Public Service Credit Union) is a safe and insured financial institution with over $2.7 billion in assets and more than 250,000 members. Canvas provides a full array of financial products and services, including savings, checking, loans, mortgages, and online and mobile options. Serving Colorado communities for more than 80 years, Canvas currently has 29 branches.last_img read more

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Hammerson JV for £300m Kingston plan

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