Police diversity scheme is a success

first_imgMorewomen and Catholics are working for the police force in Northern Irelandthan ever before, thanks to a controversial diversity programme aimed atcreating a service free from partisan control.MauraMuldoon, divisional manager for the Northern Ireland Police Service, told apublic sector conference in Londonlast week that a 50:50 recruitment policy had been introduced, with oneCatholic officer appointed for every non-Catholicrecruited. It wants 50 per cent of the service to be made up of Catholics inthe next few years. Upto four years ago, it was dominated by Protestants and other faiths, with lessthan 10 per cent of the workforce being Catholic. But a recent recruitmentcampaign led to 6,500 applications when only 450 are needed in Northern Irelandeach year.Anotherknock-on effect of the 50:50 rulehas been a dramatic increase in the number of women applying for jobs in theservice. More than 40 per cent of all new recruits are now female.Muldoonadmitted the rule had been widely contested to the point where the policy waschallenged in the House of Lords, but it was later upheld. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Police diversity scheme is a successOn 21 Sep 2004 in Police, Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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BA expects record loss leading to ‘permanent cost reductions’

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. BA expects record loss leading to ‘permanent cost reductions’By Personnel Today on 5 Feb 2010 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. British Airways (BA) is on track to make a record annual pre-tax loss despite a surprise operating profit of £25m in the three months to December, it has emerged.BA’s pre-tax loss in the nine months to December 2009 rose to £342m, from £70m in the same period in 2008. With a further three months of the financial year to come, the airline is expected to exceed last year’s record loss of £401m.The news comes as BA is locked in a High Court battle with union Unite, which claims it was never consulted over changes to cabin crew contracts. A result of a ballot later this month may show the airline is facing further industrial action, after the Christmas strike was cancelled by the courts.The company said in a statement: “Our focus on permanent cost reduction must continue if we are to return the business to profitability in the short term.”Chief executive Willie Walsh added the airline was working with staff, unions and trustees on ways to address a £3.7bn pension fund deficit. BA is also discussing a range of changes to future pension benefits, according to the Telegraph. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Amazon unveils woodsy plans for HQ2

first_imgRenderings of Amazon HQ2 and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos (Photos via NBBJ/Getty)Amazon has unveiled new plans for its second headquarters in Northern Virginia that will have an outdoorsy, woodsy theme.The tech giant’s second phase of its campus in Arlington, Virginia, will include three 22-story office buildings, a smaller retail building, an outdoor amphitheater, a dog run and parking for about 950 bicycles, according to the Wall Street Journal. It will be encircled by woodlands.The highlight of the project will be a 350-foot tower named the Helix that features two spiraling outdoor walkways along with trees and plants from Virginia, according to the newspaper. The first buildings of the second phase are expected to be finished in 2025.Inside the buildings, there could be more plants, meeting space, offices and studios for artist residency.The plans are part of the more than $2.5 billion, 25,000-employee office campus known as HQ2.Plans for the second phase have to go through a public review process. Amazon looks to break ground on the project in early 2022. A pair of office buildings that will accommodate 12,500 Amazon employees are already being built nearby.Amazon tapped Washington, D.C.-based architecture firm NBBJ to design the development.Amazon initially planned to build two HQ2 campuses, and chose Long Island City, Queens, in 2018 for the second one, after an intense competition by cities and regions across the nation. But in February 2019, the Seattle-based company scrapped its plans for the New York headquarters after pushback from New York City politicians and activists.Virginia, by contrast, greeted the internet retailer with open arms.Amazon’s design for its Virginia campus could be a harbinger of future office designs as more companies look to bring employees back to the office after switching to remote work during the pandemic.[WSJ] — Keith Larsen Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlinkcenter_img TagsamazonDevelopmentHQ2long island cityPoliticslast_img read more

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Glaciological research in the Antarctic Peninsula

first_imgThe Antarctic Peninsula is a good place for studies that take advantage of its wide range of latitude. Other worthwhile investigations are those that set in context the glacier/climate relationships and provide a framework of basic glaciological data. In order to speed reconnaissance mapping a series of seven 1:250 000 map sheets was published which used satellite imagery as the only source for planimetric detail. In preparation for intermediate depth ice core drilling for glaciological and palaeoclimatic investigations a wide-ranging programme of radio echo sounding has been pursued since 1963; flight tracks now total 80000 km. Experimental results are presented for an area at the base of the peninsula between latitudes 73° S and 80° S. Track plotting was controlled by relating observed subglacial topographic features with the surface expression of the same features revealed in a Landsat image mosaic. Thus navigation was not subject to the cumulative position errors generally encountered on long flights far from fixed points (nunataks). Redefinition of the earlier speculative boundary of the inland ice sheet added 38000 km2 to the land area of Antarctica while reducing the area of Ronne Ice Shelf by 11%. An unmapped nunatak was found 187 km from the nearest known outcrop. Three major inlets contained the thickest floating ice ever measured. Floating ice 1860 m thick was identified at a point only 17 km from the Ellsworth Mountains; thus within 60 km of the highest mountain in Antarctica (5140 m) there is a trench reaching 1600 m below sea level. Subglacially, there is potentially a channel well below sea level that connects the Bellingshausen Sea with the Weddell Sea. A radio echo sounder was adapted to measure the surface velocity of glaciers by reference to the spatial fading pattern of the bottom echo. Checks on Fleming Glacier with optical survey instruments showed that the true rate of movement was 44% faster than indicated by the fading pattern. It was concluded that the sounder had measured surface velocity with reference to a reflecting horizon which itself was deforming or sliding over the glacier bed. Experiments on ice shelves have been used to extend the flow law of ice to stresses lower than can be studied in the laboratory. At least down to the lowest stress considered (0.04 MN m-2) the results supported a power law with a stress exponent of 3 as found in the laboratory for higher stresses. Ultra-clean sampling techniques were developed for detecting extremely low levels of impurities in snow (3 x 10-14g g-1). Thus DDT concentrations were found to be 40-100 times smaller than earlier reported for snow from central Antarctica. An extensive reconnaissance programme of 10 m ice core drilling has been pursued with the object of studying relationships between oxygen isotope fractionation and ice and air temperatures. The ice, water, and energy balances of two representative local glaciers have been studied as a contribution to the International Hydrological Decade.last_img read more

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European amphibious exercise Emerald Move 2106 concludes

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today European amphibious exercise Emerald Move concludes in Italy Authorities European amphibious exercise Emerald Move concludes in Italy View post tag: Italian Navy October 14, 2016 View post tag: amphibious assault European naval ships and personnel spent the last two weeks honing their amphibious assault skills during the Italian-hosted Emerald Move 2016 which concluded today.Emerald Move is organized by the European Amphibious Initiative (EAI) while the Italian Navy was in command of the 2016 edition of the exercise for this year.About 4000 men and women engaged, 8 ships, 1 submarine, 9 aircraft AV8B Plus and 18 helicopters were under the control of Italian Navy Fleet Commander, Vice Admiral Donato Marzano while the Cagliari Naval Base provided logistic support.Amphibious forces developed interoperability and integration in the waters of the Tyrrhenian Sea and the Sardinian ranges of Capo Teulada.The exercise is scheduled to take place every five years.European Amphibious Initiative (EAI) was formed by five EU nations, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and the UK, in 2000. The aim of this organization is to strengthen the interoperability of European forces and optimize and improve European amphibious operations capabilities through training and exercises.An interesting feature of the exercise was the participation of the Italian elite commando frogman force COMSUBIN who made use of the newly commissioned Todaro-class submarine Pietro Venuti. The picture above offers a rather rare glimpse of the submarine fitted with a swimmer delivery vehicle (SDV).SDVs are used by special forces for the delivery of divers during covert operations and battles. View post tag: COMSUBIN View post tag: Emerald Move View post tag: EAI Share this articlelast_img read more

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Manufacturer sought for naan-style pasties

first_imgA 17-year-old budding entrepreneur from Gloucester is trying to secure a deal with a manufacturer to produce a new curry-style pasty.Bayjid Choudhury, of Brockworth Enterprise School, was awarded the Gloucestershire Young Entrepreneur award earlier this year for his naan-style pasties, which come in three flavours: chicken madras, chicken tikka masala and vegetable korma. The sixth-former emailed retailers to pitch his product and received a response from The Co-operative. Following a meeting, he now hopes to get the products listed if he can find a manufacturer to make them.Choudhury, who hopes to be known as the ‘naan man’ has registered his company as Maharaja Secret. He plans to develop more flavours from his father’s Indian restaurant in Gloucester.Choudhury won the Gloucestershire Young Entrepreneur award in June as part of the Gloucestershire Enterprise Learning Partnership.last_img read more

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Moseley returns to FDF

first_imgJim Moseley, the former managing director of General Mills UK, is to return to the role of acting director general of the Food and Drink Federation (FDF) following the resignation of Melanie Leech. Leech joins the British Property Federation in the New Year and the process of recruiting her successor is under way.Richard Evans, president of the FDF, said: “I am delighted to welcome Jim back to FDF. This is an important time for the sector and Jim has a wealth of industry experience and a knowledge of FDF that equips him well to see the Federation through until we have a permanent director general in place.”Moseley added: “I’m delighted to be asked to lead FDF through the transition to a new director general. FDF has enjoyed huge success under Melanie’s leadership and I look forward to continuing that progress with her talented team.”last_img read more

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Vulfpeck Members Release Debut ‘The Fearless Flyers’ EP

first_imgLast week, Vulf Records mysteriously released two tracks under a moniker The Fearless Flyers. The new band, comprised of Vulfpeck bassist Joe Dart, guitarist Cory Wong, drummer Nate Smith, and Snarky Puppy guitarist Mark Lettieri, put out two songs on Monday and Wednesday, generating huge response to the funky-fresh releases. The new project, which is produced, composed, and mixed by the “Vulfmon” himself, Jack Stratton (bandleader/multi-instrumentalist of Vulfpeck), will be pressed on a limited supply of 12″ vinyl—though the campaign to reserve your own copy closed on Friday. From the time of the announcement, it was not clear whether or not The Fearless Flyers would release a full record, or if only the two songs would appear on the pressing.Then, on Friday, without much promotion outside of a few ambiguous posts on Vulfpeck’s social media pagges, The Fearless Flyers released the full EP on Bandcamp. In addition to the previously released “Aces of Aces” and “Under the Sea / Flyers Drive”, the self-titled debut record includes four additional tracks.“Introducing the Fearless Flyers” showcases the tight musicianship between the four players, providing the style of playing that fans of Vulfpeck crave from the band’s earlier days. A sped-up, jammed-out, funkified rendition of Stevie Wonder’s “Signed, Sealed, Delivered” appears on the EP, featuring guitarist Blake Mills and gospel performer Sandra Crouch. A secondary version of “Barbara” also appears on the record, featuring Sandra Crouch again on the tambourine, as a follow-up to Vulfpeck’s 2012 Vollmich version of the song.The six-track presentation closes with “Bicentennial”, a clear continuation of the closing groove from Vulfpeck’s 2017 “Grandma” from Mr. Finish Line. Vulfpeck’s soulful original version of the song features Antwaun Stanley on vocals, David T. Walker on guitar, and James Gadson on drums and closes with a 45-second groove that left fans wanting more. The Fearless Flyers’ “Bicentennial” is the extension of that groove and it features Tedeschi Trucks Band’s Elizabeth Lea on trombone and the voice of Jack Stratton as the “sibilant announcer.”With clear ties between Vulfpeck and The Fearless Flyers, it’s safe to say that the new band is a real thing–and we want more. You can own a copy of The Fearless Flyers today for $6, if you didn’t already reserve a copy of the vinyl, here.<a href=”http://vulf.bandcamp.com/album/the-fearless-flyers”>The Fearless Flyers by The Fearless Flyers</a>In other news, Apple recently released a new commercial for the Apple Pay feature, using Vulfpeck’s “Back Pocket” as the soundtrack. The commercial is in international circulation, positioning the song to get stuck in even more heads across the globe.Vulfpeck has a light year ahead of them, with only four dates on the calendar so far. Following a festival appearance at Sweetwater 420 and two nights in New Orleans, the funk quartet will head to Morrison, Colorado, for their first-ever headlining performance at the legendary Red Rocks Amphitheatre. With KNOWER and Kamasi Washington also on the bill, the 4/27 show is shaping up to be one of the most exciting to date. Head here for more information.last_img read more

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Jeffrey Schnapp leads new approach to research in the arts and humanities

first_imgAs revolutionaries go — and he is one, embracing a dynamic new conception of humanistic research in the digital age — Jeffrey Schnapp is really quite grounded. He’s a medievalist, for one thing, a Dante scholar with impeccable credentials and a long track record in all the traditional scholarly forms. And although he founded a collaborative research lab at Harvard to incubate experimental models of knowledge creation and dissemination, he still publishes books, and still uses conventional channels to distribute them.In short, Schnapp, one of the leading theorists of an emerging set of scholarly practices referred to as the digital humanities, doesn’t intend to shock anyone with talk of a book-less, print-less e-future for the academy. Instead, he makes a persuasive case for what he calls a “print-plus” model of inquiry — a model that exploits the power of new analytic and narrative tools, a model in which iterative process, not just outcome, is important, a model in which print is one of many knowledge-sharing media.Schnapp helped pioneer this new way of thinking about humanistic practice as the founder of the influential Humanities Lab at Stanford, where he held the Pierotti Chair of Italian Studies before moving to Harvard in 2011. Now he is the faculty director of metaLAB at Harvard, a new research engine for the arts and humanities that is housed at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, a University-wide initiative. He is also a professor of Romance languages and literatures and of comparative literature, building productive ties with Ph.D. students across FAS disciplines, who are among metaLAB’s co-founders and most active members. And as a cultural historian who has curated art and architecture installations, he is on the teaching faculty at the Graduate School of Design (GSD).last_img read more

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Support for scholars

first_imgElizabeth Garcia ’16 was raised on 12th Street, a poor, drug-infested neighborhood in Palmetto, Fla., she described as “a dead end.”“My friends were teenage mothers before they were teenagers themselves,” she recalled, sharing her powerful story at the 10th annual Celebration of Scholarships dinner on April 8.Her journey from Palmetto to Harvard was dramatic, and Garcia, who was born to immigrant parents who left school in the second and seventh grades, said the financial aid she received was life-changing.“I knew I had entered the land of opportunity,” she said, of arriving at Harvard. “You believed in me.”The annual dinner at Annenberg Hall is a chance for students who get support from Harvard’s Financial Aid Initiative to connect with their donors. Co-hosted by Tim Barakett ’87, M.B.A. ’93, and his wife, Michele; Lloyd Blankfein ’75, J.D. ’78, and his wife, Laura; Ken Griffin ’89; and Jerry Jordan ’61, M.B.A. ’67, and his wife, Darlene, the evening drew more than 300 guests, including Harvard President Drew Faust, Michael D. Smith, Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and William R. Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions and financial aid for Harvard College.Harvard President Drew Faust (center) attended the dinner, which was co-hosted in part by Jerry Jordan ’61, M.B.A. ’67 (left), and Tim Barakett ’87, M.B.A. ’93 (right).“Harvard’s mission — educating citizens and citizen leaders — demands we bring together students with profoundly different life experiences. This is a necessary condition for us to be able to prepare each of them to succeed and lead in a diverse world,” said Smith, who encouraged the crowd to match Griffin’s leadership challenge to endow 600 new scholarships.Since launching the Financial Aid Initiative in 2005, Harvard has awarded nearly $1.5 billion in grant aid, and has increased its financial aid budget by 112 percent, from $80 million to almost $170 million. Students whose annual family incomes are below $65,000 pay nothing to attend, and each member of the incoming class of 2020 with that level of support will also receive $2,000 from a new start-up grant as freshmen to help ease the transition to college life.“Our financial aid program has never been more important to the country than it is right now and, to be honest, who we are as an institution,” said Fitzsimmons.In Annenberg Hall, beneath the Gothic trusses and the colorful flags marking each of Harvard’s freshman dorms, students such as Garcia and Shori Hijikata ’16 spoke about the impact financial support has had on their experiences at Harvard. Others performed. Andy Troska ’16, who plans to pursue a music career, sang “Ostrovok (The islet), Op. 14 No. 2” by Sergei Rachmaninoff, while Josh Bean ’16 accompanied singer Joshuah Campbell ’16 on piano for a beautiful rendition of the jazz standard “I Wished on the Moon.”Before the dinner, Jarrod Wetzel-Brown ’16, an English concentrator who plans to go to medical school, said the financial support he received as a beneficiary of the Thomas J. Schneider Scholarship Fund allowed him to be more reflective, and make more thoughtful decisions about his future.“In the moment, some things are more important than worrying about a test score or a project,” he said. “I learned not to just exist, but to learn, to really connect with professors and peers. I learned to linger and appreciate.”,For Bernadette Lim ’16, who is concentrating in human evolutionary biology, financial support has allowed her to have transformational experiences — studying in Kenya, studying low-income African-American families in Los Angeles for her senior thesis — outside the classroom.“Every time I do something like that I think, ‘This is the Harvard experience I never thought was possible,’” said Lim, a Kushner Family Undergraduate Scholar, before the dinner.Scholarship donor Bruce Menin ’84, a real estate developer, said the small part he contributes toward helping deserving students is rewarding, which makes the Celebration of Scholarships an “extraordinary” night to attend.“Students are so impressive and their intentions so unique and imaginative and often directed at helping the world in significant ways. They are going back to states or countries of disrepair, hoping to solve big problems,” he said. “They are eminently qualified to make an impact and you realize the world will be a better place. They are dreaming big.”He might well have been talking about Garcia, a Cabot House resident who told the audience that, along with her school studies, she found time to mentor low-income students in South Boston and serve as a co-director of the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter.“I’ve learned — there’s no doubt,” she said. “I have a lot to pay back.”last_img read more

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